Program description

Content

It is the major objective of the Masters degree programme „International Management and Engineering“  to offer students the opportunity to acquire the competencies which they will need for their future career, e.g. in a technical or management department of companies in different branches of industry, or for a future career in research (i.e. a PhD) in the area of Management and Engineering. The students’ future sphere of activities hence may include research and development, leadership and management of international projects or tasks in operational or strategic management.

In particular, after having finished their studies, students are supposed to be able to carry out managerial functions in international companies and to act successfully at the interface of management and technology. They can successfully apply methods for solving managerial as well as technical problems, and they are also able to solve new problems in changing and volatile situations. Moreover, they will develop a critical attitude towards these methods and are also able to advance the methods, whenever necessary. Hence, they have a sound foundation for acting responsibly in their jobs and for taking ethical aspects and consequences of their decisions in account.


Career prospects

Graduates of the„International Management and Engineering“ programme find many job opportunities in industry, in particular in international companies, in service companies, in particular in consulting, and in research and development. They are particularly qualified for responsible and leading positions at the interface of management and technology. 


Learning target

The graduates have acquired the basic skills, specialized knowledge and additional competences required for a national and/or international career in the interdisciplinary field of industrial engineering. They have gained scientifically based specialized knowledge of business sciences, as well as an in-depth knowledge of engineering disciplines. Hence, they are qualified for performing interdisciplinary tasks, and they are able to pursue stand-alone tasks at the interface of business management and technology. Moreover, the graduates have the capability to work in strategic and operational management functions in different types of enterprises, including multinationals, or to pursue an academic career, i.e. a PhD.

In particular, the graduates are able to apply the methods and techniques required to solve both business-related and technological tasks, to  critically analyze these methods, and to improve their development by applying new insights.

Furthermore, the graduates have acquired competences that enable them:

- To transfer their theoretical knowledge into practice

- To take on complex planning tasks in global value-added networks and successfully apply their theoretical knowledge of the management and engineering sciences in practice.

- To participate, in a leading function, in international technology and management-oriented projects.

- To analyze and critically assess processes, systems, and innovative technologies in different business-related areas.

- To also systematically consider the non-technical consequences of engineering activities and incorporate these responsibly and ethically in a socio-economic context.

- To independently acquire relevant knowledge from the scientific literature, to judge relevant publications critically and to write scientific reports.

- To carry out their own research projects

- To successfully communicate with experts from their field and from other fields in German and English

Moreover, the key qualifications acquired in the Bachelor’s program were extended and enhanced by means of suitable teaching methods within the Master’s degree course. In addition, the students’ intercultural competence was developed and their ability to work in a team was improved.


Program structure

In this degree programme, students gain broad management competencies, especially for the application in an industrial  and international operational area. Students can enhance their knowledge in special fields as, e.g. Supply Chain Management, Technology Management, Human Resource Management, Strategic Management or Marketing, Controlling or Operations Research. They can concentrate on different core areas, namely on

- Marketing and Technology

- Supply Chain Management and Logistics

- Corporate Management

- Entrepreneurship

In addition, students can select an engineering specialization. There are different areas of engineering on offer:

- Civil Engineering

- Electrical Engineering

- Power and Environmental Engineering

- Information Technology

- Logistics

- Aviation Systems

- Mechatronics

- Product Development and Production

- Renewable Energy

- Process Engineering and Biotechnology

As the third semester does not contain any comp1ulsory courses, it is particularly well suited for a stay abroad at one of the many partner universities of TUHH. The TUHH strongly supports students when they are planning such a stay abroad. 

Core Qualification

Module M0560: Institutional Environment of International Management

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Research Methods in International Management (L1911) Lecture 1 2
Business Environment of Selected Countries (L0159) Seminar 3 4
Module Responsible Prof. Thomas Wrona
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge in international and intercultural management, familiarity with the content of the International Management lecture

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Knowledge: Students will be able to

  • evaluate the importance of the institutional framework for doing business in different countries
  • outline and critically reflect  the economic and legal framework in selected countries
  • understand historic, demographic and economic indicators in specific economic areas within an international context
  • understand and apply methods of analysis of the external environment (competitive analysis , industry structure analysis by Porter, PESTEL analysis, Porter‘s Diamond and Cluster analysis)
  • explain different objectives of empirical research in general and in international management research in particular

  • explain and critically reflect on different ways of organizing empirical research

  • describe and distinguish ideal-typical research designs

Skills

Skills: based on the acquired knowledge, Students will be able to


  • recognize and subsequently assess different risks and other influencing factors while conducting an environmental analysis in an international context
  • identify typical problems within international management to develop solution proposals
  • analyze, interpret and present external and internal information in different, international economic contexts 
  • to set up a suitable research design based on specific problems within international management

  • to assess the influence of different research goals on the selected research design
  • to conceptualize an ideal research process for a simple research problem

  • to adequately integrate theoretical knowledge in international management into a research design (qual./quan.)
  • to critically evaluate the quality and meaningfulness (rigor / relevance) of exemplary empirical studies

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Social competence: After completion of the module Students will be able to

  • conduct subject-specific and interdisciplinary discussions
  • present results of their work
  • respectful work in a team
Autonomy

Self-employment: After completion of the module Students will bee able to

  • work independently and to transfer the acquired knowledge to new problem areas
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes 33 % Midterm
Examination Subject theoretical and practical work
Examination duration and scale approx. 30 pages and presentation
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Course L1911: Research Methods in International Management
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Thomas Wrona
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Foundation of empirical research
  • Types of scientific statements
  • Objectives of empirical research (designs)
  • Special research questions of international management research
  • Content and process of quantitative international management research 
  • Content and process of qualitative international management research
  • General issues of empirical research (indication of research designs, quality criteria)
  • Literature reviews as examples of non-empirical research
Literature
  • Bortz, J./Döring, N. (2006): Forschungsmethoden und Evaluation für Human- und Sozialwissenschaftler, 4. überarb. Aufl., Nachdruck, Heidelberg 2009.
  • Brühl, R. (2014): Wie Wissenschaft Wissen schafft - Wissenschaftstheorie für Sozial- und Wirtschaftswissenschaften, Stuttgart 2014 (UTB Taschenbuch)
  • Bryman, A./Bell, E. (2015). Business research methods. Oxford University Press, USA.
  • Eisenhardt, K. M./Graebner, M. E. (2007): Theory building from cases: Opportunities and challenges, in: Academy of Management Journal, 50. Jg. 2007, Heft 1, S. 25-32.
  • Flick, U. (2009). An Introduction to Qualitative Research (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
  • Kirsch, W./Seidl, D./van Aaken, D. (2007): Betriebswirtschaftliche Forschung. Wissenschaftstheoretische Grundlagen und Anwendungsorientierung, Stuttgart 2007.
  • Oesterle, Michael-Jörg, and Stefan Schmid. "Internationales Management." Forschung, Lehre, Praxis. Schäffer-Poeschel, Stuttgart (2009).
  • Töpfer, A. (2009): Erfolgreich forschen, Berlin/Heidelberg 2009.
  • Wrona, T. (2005): Die Fallstudienanalyse als wissenschaftliche Forschungsmethode, ESCP-EAP Working Paper Nr. 10, Berlin 2005 (wird zum Download zur Verfügung gestellt).
  • Wrona, T./Bauer, A. (i.V.): Theory-based Qualitative Case Study Research (Lehrbuch in Vorbereitung)

Übungstexte, die während der Vorlesung herausgegeben werden.

Course L0159: Business Environment of Selected Countries
Typ Seminar
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Thomas Wrona
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Competitiveness of firms/industries/nations/regions
  • Competition Across Locations & Global Strategy for MNCs
  • Industry Competition, Strategy and Location 
  • The Diamond Model: developing/developed Economies 
  • Clusters and Cluster Development
  • Harvard case studies of selected firms/industries/nations/regions
  • Development and presentation of case studies in groups
  • Participant-centered learning
  • Composition of a cluster- and country-related seminar thesis
Literature
  • Audretsch, D. and Feldman, M. (1996), “Knowledge spillovers and the geography of innovation and production”, American Economic Review, Vol. 86 No. 3, pp. 630-640.
  • Bamberger, I. and Wrona, T. (2012), Strategische Unternehmensführung, 2., erweiterte Auflage, München 2012.
  • Bamberger, I./Wrona, T. (2012): Strategische Unternehmensführung, 2., erweiterte Auflage, München 2012.
  • Bell, G.G. (2005), “Clusters, networks, and firm innovativeness”, Strategic Management Journal, Vol. 26 No. 3, pp. 287-295.
  • Krugman, P. (1991), Geography and Trade, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA.
  • Porter, M.E. (1990), The Competitive Advantage of Nations, Free Press, New York, NY.
  • Porter, M.E. (1991): Nationale Wettbewerbsvorteile, München 1991
  • Porter, M.E. (2008): On Competition, Boston MA 2008
  • Tallman, S., Jenkins, M., Henry, N. and Pinch, S. (2004), “Knowledge, clusters and competitive advantage”, Academy of Management Review, Vol. 29 No. 2, pp. 258-271.

Module M0698: Accounting

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Management and Financial Accounting (L0143) Lecture 4 4
Corporate Finance (L0107) Lecture 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Matthias Meyer
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge of accounting and general business administration.

The previous knowledge required for successful completion of this module, in particular of bookkeeping, is imparted within the framework of an e-learning programme.

Through an online test, the student can earn points which are added to the final examination result of the module.

Students receive access and further information to the corresponding online learning module upon enrolment.

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students know …

  • the basic structure of the current cost recording and allocation and can be used in
  • Different cost classifications (variable/fixed, individual/joint) and can classify them theoretically;

  • Subdivide into cost element, cost center and cost object accounting
  • the concept and necessity of cost centers;
  • Different costing procedures
  • simulation-based methods for the design of cost accounting systems
  • Instruments for cost planning and control;
  • various partial cost accounting systems as an alternative to full cost accounting and can characterize these comprehensively;
  • modern developments in cost management;
  • the Accuracy Effort Tradeoff and variance-based criticisms of Activity-Based Costing
  • the structure of the balance sheet, and they can explain individual balance sheet items with regard to their approach and valuation
  • the components of the financial statements according to HGB and IFRS and can explain them;
  • the difference between the total cost method and the cost of sales method;
  • Function and methodology of the audit;
  • the procedure of balance sheet analysis and can explain the steps of method selection, data preparation and data evaluation
  • the most important financial and performance indicators and can derive them
  • The role of the finance function in internationally operating companies and the interdependencies between investment and financing
  • the main theories and models in the field of investment and financing;
  • Methods for evaluating companies and investment decisions;
  • Approaches to risk assessment in the field of investment and financing and portfolio theory;
  • alternative financing options and their specific design and valuation;
  • the contents and methods of short- and long-term financial planning;
Skills

The students are able…

  • to explain characteristics of the cost and activity accounting and to apply methods from this range to economical problem definitions

  • to describe the tasks of cost type, cost centre and cost unit accounting as well as to discuss the classification into the basic schema of cost recording and allocation;
    to differentiate between different possibilities of the case-by-case special allocation of cost center services and to implement them purposefully;
    to characterize and apply different calculation methods depending on the homogeneity or heterogeneity of the created activity units;
    to classify and apply marginal cost accounting as well as contribution margins related to bottlenecks as decision-oriented cost accounting systems and to interpret the results of their analyses;
    to distinguish cost planning from cost management;
    To apply process cost accounting and target costing and to interpret the results of their analyses;
    interpret current research results on the design of cost accounting systems
    to explain the connections between the different parts of the operational accountancy and to differentiate their addressees and arithmetic variables;
    to explain and interpret the legal provisions of the German Commercial Code on accounting and bookkeeping and to apply them to common facts of business operations;
    to identify and critically evaluate differences between HGB and IFRS with respect to material balance sheet items;
    to explain the technique of balance sheet analysis, to apply it to the annual financial statements of various international companies (including IFRS) and to draw conclusions about the prevailing economic conditions there;
    to explain theories and models for the investment management of international enterprises, to evaluate their application possibilities and to reflect critically on the results;
    to apply methods of financial mathematics to investment and financing problems and to use suitable software tools for the calculations;
    to adequately evaluate investment projects of internationally operating companies using suitable business management methods and indicators, to determine the optimal investment portfolio and to decide on it;
    to determine the capital requirements and capital costs of globally operating companies;
    to evaluate financing alternatives and select them based on the results;
    to determine, in the context of globalized financial markets, an appropriate level of dividends and the dividend policy of companies, as well as the type, volume, maturity and yield of corporate bonds;
    to financially assess the attractiveness of acquisitions by international competitors.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students can…

  • analyse business problems in a team and develop solutions together;

    present the results of their analyses in an understandable way, also in English;

    explain the implications of current research results to others and to reflect critically on them togethe

  • act as a competent contact within the framework of an audit;
  • determine the ethical dilemmas of investment and financing decisions and to take them into account within the framework of decision analyses;
  • assume leadership responsibility in questions of investment and financing in the company, but also in teamwork, and to present technically sound proposals for solutions.


Autonomy

The students are able…

  • to apply the presented methods of cost accounting in order to analyze business problems and to interpret and critically evaluate the results;
    to critically analyze the capital structure of globally operating companies
    to transfer the theoretical knowledge about accounting into operational practice;
    to decide independently which accounting methods can be used for which problems;
    to acquire knowledge about the subject area independently and to transfer the acquired knowledge to new questions;
    to use cost accounting systems independently and to design them purposefully;
    to carry out operational accounting tasks independently, also in internationally active companies;
    to use methods of the illustration and analysis of the seized business transactions, in order to analyze economical problem definitions and to evaluate the results critically;
    to interpret and critically evaluate the key figures determined within the framework of a balance sheet analysis;
    to strategically optimize the capital structure of a company and to use the different forms of corporate financing on the global financial markets in an appropriate manner;
    to carry out short-term and long-term financial planning;
    to analyse and optimise the profit and risk position of an internationally operating company;
    to evaluate companies and make international acquisition decisions.


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes 33 % Midterm
Yes 5 % Excercises
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Course L0143: Management and Financial Accounting
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 4
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 64, Study Time in Lecture 56
Lecturer Prof. Matthias Meyer
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

Management Accounting

  • Cost type accounting: Cost concepts, recognition and evaluation of resources
  • Cost center accounting: Expense distribution, stepladder method, equation method, indirect cost apportionment, special settlement of cost center service
  • Costing: Causer-pays and marginal principle, output costing, equivalence number costing, overhead calculation, charge rate calculation
  • Cost unit accounting: unit-of-output costing, cost unit period costing, total cost accounting, cost of sales accounting
  • Standard cost accounting: Cost resolution, fixed and flexible planned cost calculation, marginal costing
  • Breakeven analysis: Direct costing, multi-level fixed cost absorption, bottleneck-related contribution margin in operational production program planning
  • Modern cost management: Relevance Lost, activity based costing, target costing

Financial Accounting

  • Importance of financial accounting and initial overview
  • Accounting principles and regulations: General approach, valuation and disclosure regulations (HGB)
  • Total and sales cost format, annex
  • International financial reporting (IFRS, US-GAAP)
  • Accounting policy
  • Auditing
  • Balance sheet analysis: Choice of method(s), data processing, data evaluation
  • Annual report analysis (financial: investment analysis, financing analysis, liquidity analysis; performance: cost analysis, earnings analysis, profitability analysis)

Exercise:

Both parts of the lecture include an exercise. For the Managment Accounting part there are also Web-based exercises for self-testing.




Literature

Literatur internes Rechnungswesen:

  1. Skript und Unterlagen, die zur Vorlesung und Übung herausgegeben werden.
  2. Ausgewählte Bücher:
    • Horngren, C. T. /Bhimani, A./Datar, S. M./Foster, G. (2005): Management and Cost Accounting, 3rd ed., Harlow.
  • Friedl, G./ Hofmann, C./Pedell, Burkhard. (2010): Kostenrechnung: eine entscheidungsorientierte Einführung, München.
  • Joos-Sachse, T. (2006): Controlling, Kostenrechnung und Kostenmanagement, 4. Aufl., Stuttgart.
  • Schweitzer, M./Küpper, H.-U. (2008): Systeme der Kosten- und Erlösrechnung, 9. Aufl., München.
  • Weber, J./Weißenberger, B. (2010): Einführung in das Rechnungswesen, 8. Aufl., Stuttgart.

Literatur externes Rechnungswesen:

  1. Skript und Unterlagen, die zur Vorlesung und Übung herausgegeben werden.
  2. Ausgewählte Bücher:
    • Coenenberg, A./Haller, A./Mattner, G./Schultze, W. (2009): Einführung in das Rechnungswesen, 3. Aufl., Stuttgart.
  • Döring,U./Buchholz, R. (2009): Buchhaltung und Jahresabschluss, 11. Aufl., Berlin.
  • Heinhold, M. (2010): Buchführung in Fallbeispielen, 11. Aufl., Stuttgart.
  • Pellens, B./Fülbier, R. U./Gassen, J./Sellhorn, T. (2011): Internationale Rechnungslegung: IFRS 1 bis 9, IAS 1 bis 41, IFRIC-Interpretationen, Standardentwürfe Mit Beispielen, Aufgaben und Fallstudie 8. Aufl., Stuttgart.
  • Wöhe, G./Döring, U. (2010): Einführung in die allgemeine Betriebswirtschaftslehre, 24. Aufl., München.
  1. Gesetzestexte/Standards:
  • Handelsgesetzbuch (HGB) (Achtung: BilMoG!), teilw. Aktiengesetz (AktG)
http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/hgb/index.html


Course L0107: Corporate Finance
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Christian Ringle
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Introduction to corporate finance and financial management of the multinational firm;
  • Valuation and capital budgeting (e.g., time value of money, valuing stocks and corporate bonds, discounted cash flow, net present value and other criteria, making capital investment decisions);
  • Risk and return (e.g., measuring risk, risk and diversification, the cost of capital, dividend decisions, valuation principles such as WACC, APV, multiples and real options);
  • Capital structure (e.g., equity financing and stocks, debt financing and corporate bonds, leasing and off-balance-sheet financing);
  • Options and futures (e.g., call and put options, warrants and convertibles, financial risk management with derivates);
  • Financing and financial planning of the multinational firm (e.g., financial statement analysis, short and long-term financial planning, cash and credit management);
  • International corporate finance (e.g., foreign exchange exposure and management, international portfolio investments, international mergers and acquisitions);
  • Comparison of Germany to other countries, especial to the USA, using e.g. case studies and exercises on internationally important topics (financial markets, companies, pension and stock markets, company risk, investments, level of debt).


Literature

Mandatory literature:

Brealey, R.A./Myers, S.C./Marcus, A.J (2020): Fundamentals of Corporate Finance, 10e, New York: McGraw-Hill.

Additional literature:

Brealey, R.A./Myers, S.C./Allen, F. (2020): Principles of Corporate Finance, 13e, New York: McGraw-Hill.

Berk, J./DeMarzo, P. (2017): Corporate Finance, 5e, Boston: Pearson.

Eun, C.S./Resnick, B.G. (2018): International Financial Management, 8e, New York: McGraw-Hill.

Ross, S./Westerfield, R./Jaffe, J./Jordan, B. (2016): Corporate Finance, 11e, New York: McGraw-Hill.

Ross, S.A./Westerfield, R.W./Jaffe, J./Jordan, B. (2018): Corporate Finance: Core Principles and Applications, 5e, New York: McGraw-Hill.


Module M0820: International Business

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Business-to-Business Marketing (L0762) Lecture 2 2
Intercultural Management and Communication (L0846) Lecture 2 2
International Management (L0157) Lecture 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Christian Lüthje
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Bachelor-level knowledge in marketing and (international) strategic management; basic understanding of market segmentation, modes of market entry, strategic management, pricing theory and marketing instruments.

The previous knowledge which is required for this module is taught by e-learning modules. Students receive access data and information regarding the online learning module after enrolment at TUHH.


Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students will develop a thorough understanding of the following:

  • Selling to organizations and marketing strategies in B2B markets
  • Relevant theories, methods and tools for operational B2B marketing
  • Relevant theories for intercultural communication
  • Theoretical knowledge of
    • the importance of globalization for firms and the challenges facing companies in the context of their international operations;
    • methods of measuring the internationalization degree of companies and the resulting practical implications;
    • target market strategies, market entry strategies and foreign operation modes and allocation strategies;
    • different types of international organizational structures (e.g. global organization, network organization, transnational organization);
    • "culture" and its impact on human interaction;
    • important aspects of (intercultural) communication issues.
    • methods of analysis and assessment of market entry risks by applying modern theories such as the “Innovator’s Dilemma” framework;
    • modes of cooperation such as prime contractor and consortium models and their industrial cooperation related advantages and disadvantages;
    • special methods of assessment of specific country risks;


Skills

The students will be able to apply this knowledge to

  • identify and systematically address relevant partners when selling to business organizations;
  • place, price and communicate industrial products with the help state-of-the-art B2B marketing tools;
  • define the specifics of global industries and respond to them deriving appropriate practical recommendations (global competitors, regional consumers, local and global suppliers, etc.);
  • derive advantages and disadvantages of different target market, market entry, timing and allocation strategies;
  • apply the theoretical knowledge to business cases or real examples (e.g. internationalization processes of well-known hotel chains or franchise companies, etc.);
  • interpret symbols, rituals and gestures appropriately in an intercultural context.

Based on these skills, the students will be able to

  • analyze market-entry options and market positioning in B2B markets;
  • systematically analyze, work up and present information needed for making the decision for or against internationalization of company’s operations and regarding HOW, WHEN and WHAT;
  • analyze and evaluate risks in the context of international business operations;
  • decide which mode of market entry (e.g. franchising) yields most potential;
  • make methodically based internationalization decisions as well as master the specifics of strategic management in an international context and apply concrete planning processes;
  • develop strategies when approaching international client companies and manage relationships with complex client entities;
  • develop sophisticated market-entry strategies and to position innovative industrial goods in global business-to-business markets;
  • develop communication strategies in the domain of industrial goods, develop pricing plans by applying state-of-the-art tools like Vickrey-auctions to measure willingness-to-pay and methods such as tender-bidding models.
  • solve complex operating planning tasks independently or in a team applying  appropriate methods and comprehensibly present the results of their analysis;
  • identify problems and resolve cultural issues in multi-cultural teams and in intercultural collaborations
  • successfully manage cultural diversity.
Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students will be able to

  • have fruitful professional discussions;
  • present and defend the results of their work in a group of students;
  • work successfully in multi-cultural teams
  • communicate and collaborate successfully and respectfully with others, also on an intercultural basis.


Autonomy

The students will be able to

  • acquire knowledge in the specific context independently and to map this knowledge onto other new complex problem fields.


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes 5 % Excercises
Examination Subject theoretical and practical work
Examination duration and scale 3 written tests during the semester
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Course L0762: Business-to-Business Marketing
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Christian Lüthje
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content Contents

Business-to-business (B2B) markets play an important role in most economies. At the same time, B2B markets differ strongly from consumer goods markets. For example, companies’ buying decisions follow different rules than those of consuming individuals. Consequently, marketing mix decisions in B2B markets need to follow the specific circumstances in such markets.

The aim of this lecture is to enable students to understand the specifics of marketing in B2B markets. At the beginning, students learn which strategic marketing decisions may be most appropriate in industrial markets. Following that, the lecture will focus more on different options to design marketing mix elements - Pricing, Communication and Distribution - in B2B markets. We extend the student’s basic knowhow in marketing and focus on the specific requirements in B2B markets.

Topics
  • The importance, specific characteristics and developments of B2B markets today
  • Organizational buying behavior and the corporate buying process
  • B2B marketing strategies regarding modes and time of market entry with focus on innovative industrial products
  • Types of project-related cooperation in the B2B project business
  • Specific operational marketing methods in communication (success factors of fares and exhibitions, importance of public relations for B2B markets); pricing (measuring willingness-to-pay via auctions; value-based pricing in industrial markets, bidding models and auctioning); distribution and channel strategies for B2B markets
  • Marketing in complex value chains: Solving the problem of direct customers’ unwillingness to adopt innovative products by directly addressing indirect customers

Knowledge

The students will develop a thorough understanding of:

  • How organizations and firms buy
  • How marketing can be performed in complex value chains
  • Promising market and competitive strategies in B2B markets
  • Modes of cooperation in B2B markets
  • Marketing-Mix decisions in B2B marketing (communication, pricing, distribution)

Skills

  • analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of different target market, market entry, timing and allocation strategies;
  • identifying and systematically address relevant partners when selling to business organizations;
  • developing context-specific market-entry and timing strategies;
  • making appropriate decisions for the pricing and communication of industrial products;
  • applying the theoretical knowledge to business cases or real examples

Social Competence

The students will be able to

  • having fruitful professional discussions;
  • presenting and defending the results of their work in groupwork;

Self-reliance

  • acquiring knowledge in the specific context independently and to map this knowledge onto other new complex problem fields.

Assessment

Written examination & Class participation in interactive elements (presentations, homework)

Literature

Blythe, J., Zimmerman, A. (2005) Business-to-Business Marketing: A global perspective, London, Thomson 

Monroe, K. B. (2002). Pricing: Making Profitable Decisions, 3rd Edition

Morris, M., Pitt, L., Honeycutt, E. (2001), Business-to-Business Marketing, New York, Sage Publishing, 3rd Edition

Nagle, T., Hogan, J., Zale, J. (2009), Strategy and Tactics of Pricing, New York, Prentice Hall, 5th Edition

Course L0846: Intercultural Management and Communication
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Elke Christiane Fismer
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

Globalization of business processes and the revolution in information and communication technologies (ICT) have resulted in distributed workflows across geographic boundaries. These developments as well as increased immigration emanating, for example, as a consequence of a shortage of skilled labour in many industrialized nations, have led to the creation of (virtual) multi-cultural, multi-ethnic teams with diverse cultural backgrounds. Such diversity generally has a positive impact on creativity and innovativeness, as many empirical studies confirm. Nevertheless, varying cultural practices, communication styles, and contextual sensibilities have the potential to disturb or even disrupt collaborative work processes, if left unmanaged.

This course focuses on inter-cultural management
from both, theoretical as well as practical, points of view to provide a solid fundament to students enabling them to operate successfully in cross-cultural settings. Case studies and guest lecture(s) will be used to provide added practical relevance to the course. In addition, where practicable, student assignments will be used to foster autonomous learning.

Some of the main topics covered in this course include:

  • Understanding “culture” and its impact on human interaction
  • Verbal and non-verbal communication
  • High and low context communication
  • Role of formality and non-formality in communication
  • Varying interpretations of symbols, rituals & gestures
  • Managing diversity in domestic settings
Literature
  • Bartlett, C.A. / Ghoshal, S. (2002): Managing Across Borders: The Transnational Solution, 2nd edition, Boston
  • Deresky, H. (2006): International Management: Managing Across Borders and Cultures, 3rd edition, Upper Saddle  River
  • French, R. (2010): Cross-cultural Management in Work Organisations, 2nd edition, London
  • Hofstede, G. (2003): Culture's Consequences : Comparing Values, Behaviors, Institutions and Organizations across Nations, 2nd edition, Thousand Oaks
  • Hofstede, G. / Hofstede, G.J. (2006): Cultures and Organizations: Software of the mind, 2nd edition, New York


Course L0157: International Management
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Thomas Wrona
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

Growing internationalization of companies and increased globalization require dealing with operations and specifics of international management as well as creating an understanding of intercultural differences. In order to help the students to understand these specifics and challenges accompanying international companies, the course will be divided in the following parts:

  • Important Aspects in International Management
  • Theories of Internationalization
  • Specific characteristics of international companies and their strategies
  • Organizational Structure and Leadership in international companies

During the course, the content will be covered from a theoretical as well as a practical point of view by using examples of different companies. In order to provide practical relevance to the course, a guest speaker from a well-known international company will be invited or alternatively a company visit will be organized as well as an analysis of a case study will take place. 

Literature
  1. Course notes and materials provided before the lecture.
  2. Selected books:
    • Bartlett/Ghoshal (2002): Managing Across Borders, The Transnational Solution, 2nd edition, Boston
    • Buckley, P.J./Ghauri, P.N. (1998), The Internationalization of the Firm, 2nd edition
    • Czinkota, Ronkainen, Moffett, Marinova, Marinov (2009), International Business, Hoboken
    • Dunning, J.H. (1993), The Globalization of Business: The Challenge of the 1990s, London
    • Ghoshal, S. (1987), Global Strategy: An Organizing Framework, Strategic Management Journal, p. 425-440
    • Praveen Parboteeah, K.,Cullen, J.B. (2011) , Strategic International Management, International 5th Edition
    • Rugman, A.M./Collinson, S. (2012): International Business, 6th Edition, Essex 2012

Module M0524: Non-technical Courses for Master

Module Responsible Dagmar Richter
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge None
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The Nontechnical Academic Programms (NTA)

imparts skills that, in view of the TUHH’s training profile, professional engineering studies require but are not able to cover fully. Self-reliance, self-management, collaboration and professional and personnel management competences. The department implements these training objectives in its teaching architecture, in its teaching and learning arrangements, in teaching areas and by means of teaching offerings in which students can qualify by opting for specific competences and a competence level at the Bachelor’s or Master’s level. The teaching offerings are pooled in two different catalogues for nontechnical complementary courses.

The Learning Architecture

consists of a cross-disciplinarily study offering. The centrally designed teaching offering ensures that courses in the nontechnical academic programms follow the specific profiling of TUHH degree courses.

The learning architecture demands and trains independent educational planning as regards the individual development of competences. It also provides orientation knowledge in the form of “profiles”.

The subjects that can be studied in parallel throughout the student’s entire study program - if need be, it can be studied in one to two semesters. In view of the adaptation problems that individuals commonly face in their first semesters after making the transition from school to university and in order to encourage individually planned semesters abroad, there is no obligation to study these subjects in one or two specific semesters during the course of studies.

Teaching and Learning Arrangements

provide for students, separated into B.Sc. and M.Sc., to learn with and from each other across semesters. The challenge of dealing with interdisciplinarity and a variety of stages of learning in courses are part of the learning architecture and are deliberately encouraged in specific courses.

Fields of Teaching

are based on research findings from the academic disciplines cultural studies, social studies, arts, historical studies, communication studies, migration studies and sustainability research, and from engineering didactics. In addition, from the winter semester 2014/15 students on all Bachelor’s courses will have the opportunity to learn about business management and start-ups in a goal-oriented way.

The fields of teaching are augmented by soft skills offers and a foreign language offer. Here, the focus is on encouraging goal-oriented communication skills, e.g. the skills required by outgoing engineers in international and intercultural situations.

The Competence Level

of the courses offered in this area is different as regards the basic training objective in the Bachelor’s and Master’s fields. These differences are reflected in the practical examples used, in content topics that refer to different professional application contexts, and in the higher scientific and theoretical level of abstraction in the B.Sc.

This is also reflected in the different quality of soft skills, which relate to the different team positions and different group leadership functions of Bachelor’s and Master’s graduates in their future working life.

Specialized Competence (Knowledge)

Students can

  • explain specialized areas in context of the relevant non-technical disciplines,
  • outline basic theories, categories, terminology, models, concepts or artistic techniques in the disciplines represented in the learning area,
  • different specialist disciplines relate to their own discipline and differentiate it as well as make connections, 
  • sketch the basic outlines of how scientific disciplines, paradigms, models, instruments, methods and forms of representation in the specialized sciences are subject to individual and socio-cultural interpretation and historicity,
  • Can communicate in a foreign language in a manner appropriate to the subject.
Skills

Professional Competence (Skills)

In selected sub-areas students can

  • apply basic and specific methods of the said scientific disciplines,
  • aquestion a specific technical phenomena, models, theories from the viewpoint of another, aforementioned specialist discipline,
  • to handle simple and advanced questions in aforementioned scientific disciplines in a sucsessful manner,
  • justify their decisions on forms of organization and application in practical questions in contexts that go beyond the technical relationship to the subject.



Personal Competence
Social Competence

Personal Competences (Social Skills)

Students will be able

  • to learn to collaborate in different manner,
  • to present and analyze problems in the abovementioned fields in a partner or group situation in a manner appropriate to the addressees,
  • to express themselves competently, in a culturally appropriate and gender-sensitive manner in the language of the country (as far as this study-focus would be chosen), 
  • to explain nontechnical items to auditorium with technical background knowledge.





Autonomy

Personal Competences (Self-reliance)

Students are able in selected areas

  • to reflect on their own profession and professionalism in the context of real-life fields of application
  • to organize themselves and their own learning processes      
  • to reflect and decide questions in front of a broad education background
  • to communicate a nontechnical item in a competent way in writen form or verbaly
  • to organize themselves as an entrepreneurial subject country (as far as this study-focus would be chosen)     



Workload in Hours Depends on choice of courses
Credit points 6
Courses
Information regarding lectures and courses can be found in the corresponding module handbook published separately.

Module M0554: Quantitative Methods - Statistics and Operations Research

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Quantitative Methods - Statistics and Operations Research (L0127) Lecture 3 4
Quantitative Methods - Statistics and Operations Research (L0250) Recitation Section (small) 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Kathrin Fischer
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Knowledge of Mathematics on the Bachelor Level. Relevant previous knowledge is taught and tested by an online module.


Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students know

  • different methods from the field of descriptive statistics and can explain them and their importance for Business Analysis;
  • different discrete and continuous distribution functions and can explain their meaning and their areas of application
  • the laws of probability theory as, e.g. the Bayes rule, and can explain them;
  • different methods of oinferential statistics - e.g. confidence intervals, hypothesis testing and regression analysis - and can explain their theoretical background;
  • fields of research in which statistical methods are applied;
  • the history and relevance of Operations Research;
  • linear programming methods for solving planning problems and can explain them;
  • selected methods of transportation and network optimization amd can explain them;
  • integer programming models and methods, e.g. for location planning;
  • appropriate software for solving these problems;
  • relevant areas of OR research.
Skills

Students are able to

  • collect empirical data by appropriate methods, to aggregate, classify and analyze the data and to draw conclusions from them also in complex and realistic situations, e.g. for time series;
  • recognize different distribution functions and to apply them in the solution of Business problems;
  • apply laws of probability, as e.g. the Bayes rule, to construct solutions for Business and Engineering problems;
  • select appropriate methods of inferential statistics, apply them to Business problems and evaluate the results of their analysis;
  • construct appropriate quantitative - linear or integer - models for Business and Engineerig planning situations;
  • apply methods from linear and integer programming and interpret and evaluate the results;
  • apply methods from transport and network planning and interpret and evaluate the results;
  • solve the problems with appropriate software, carry out sensitivity analyses and evaluate the results;
  • develop a critical judgement of the different methods and their applicability;
  • use models and methods from Statistics and OR to analyse problems from the areas of business and engineering and to evaluate the results;
  • apply their theoretical knowledge of the different methods to practical problems, in particular in international value chains and also to apply their knowledge to specific research problems.
Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to

  • engage in scientific discussions on topics from the fields of Statistics and OR;
  • present the results of their work to specialists;
  • work successfully and respectfully in a team.
Autonomy

Students are able to

  • carry out complex data analyses independently, individually or in a team;
  • solve complex Business planning problems independently or in a team, selecting and using appropriate software;
  • gather knowledge in the area independently and research-based, and to apply their knowledge also in new and unknown situations;
  • critically evaluate the results of their work and the consequences.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes 2.5 % Excercises
Yes 47.5 % Midterm
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 3 hours
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Course L0127: Quantitative Methods - Statistics and Operations Research
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Kathrin Fischer
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

Statistics

  • Descriptive Statistics: Graphical representations, calculation of relevant measures of central tendency etc., also by using a computer; application of methods for large data sets, analysis and comparison of results, critical discussion and evaluation of methods and their use in scientific projects and business practice
  • Probability theory: important laws, dependent probabilities, Bayes Rule; application to practical problems
  • Use and application of probability distributions , as e.g. Binomial and Normal distribution to Management and Engineering problems
  • Methods of inferential statistics: confidence intervals: theoretical background and applications; hypothesis testing: theoretical background and application to business problems; regression analysis: theoretical background and application in research practice.

    Operations Research
  • Linear Programming: Modelling business decision situations, solving problems by Simplex method and by using software, theoretical background of Simplex procedure, Dual Simplex procedure and blocked variables, special cases (degeneracy etc.); sensitivity analysis and interpretation
  • Transportation planning: Modellung transportation and transshipment problems in global networks; Solving transportation problems using software
  • Network Optimization problems: modelling production and transportation networks, solving planning problems in networks, Network Planning as a research topic
  • Integer Programming: Models using integer variables, e.g. in location decisions, branch and bound procedure
Literature

Ausgewählte Bücher:

D.R. Anderson / D.J. Sweeney / T.A. Williams / Martin: Quantitative Methods for Business. 11th Edition, Thomson, South Western 2008.

Bluman, Alan G.: Elementary Statistics - A brief version. Third Edition, McGrawHill 2006.
Bowerman, Bruce L. and O’Connell, Richard T.: Business Statistics in Practice, 8th edition, McGraw-Hill 2016.

Domschke, W., Drexl, A.: Einführung in Operations Research, 9. Auflage, Springer, Berlin et al. 2015.

Domschke, W. / A. Drexl / R. Klein / A. Scholl / S. Voß: Übungen und Fallbeispiele zum Operations Research, 8. Auflage, Springer, Berlin et al. 2015

Hillier, F.S., Lieberman, G.J.: Introduction to Operations Research. 11th Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2014.

Schira, J.: Statistische Methoden der VWL und BWL - Theorie und Praxis. 5. Auflage, Pearson Verlag 2016.

Zudem: Skript und Unterlagen, die  zur Vorlesung herausgegeben werden.


Course L0250: Quantitative Methods - Statistics and Operations Research
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Kathrin Fischer
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

Statistics

  • Descriptive Statistics: Graphical representations, calculation of relevant measures of central tendency etc., also by using a computer; application of methods for large data sets, analysis and comparison of results, critical discussion and evaluation of methods and their use in scientific projects and business practice
  • Probability theory: important laws, dependent probabilities, Bayes Rule; application to practical problems
  • Use and application of probability distributions , as e.g. Binomial and Normal distribution to Management and Engineering problems
  • Methods of inferential statistics: confidence intervals: theoretical background and applications; hypothesis testing: theoretical background and application to business problems; regression analysis: theoretical background and application in research practice.

    Operations Research
  • Linear Programming: Modelling business decision situations, solving problems by Simplex method and by using software, theoretical background of Simplex procedure, Dual Simplex procedure and blocked variables, special cases (degeneracy etc.); sensitivity analysis and interpretation
  • Transportation planning: Modellung transportation and transshipment problems in global networks; Solving transportation problems using software
  • Network Optimization problems: modelling production and transportation networks, solving planning problems in networks, Network Planning as a research topic
  • Integer Programming: Models using integer variables, e.g. in location decisions, branch and bound procedure

Literature

Ausgewählte Bücher:

D.R. Anderson / D.J. Sweeney / T.A. Williams / Martin: Quantitative Methods for Business. 11th Edition, Thomson, South Western 2008.

Bluman, Alan G.: Elementary Statistics - A brief version. Third Edition, McGrawHill 2006.
Bowerman, Bruce L. and O’Connell, Richard T.: Business Statistics in Practice, 8th edition, McGraw-Hill 2016.

Domschke, W., Drexl, A.: Einführung in Operations Research, 9. Auflage, Springer, Berlin et al. 2015.

Domschke, W. / A. Drexl / R. Klein / A. Scholl / S. Voß: Übungen und Fallbeispiele zum Operations Research, 8. Auflage, Springer, Berlin et al. 2015

Hillier, F.S., Lieberman, G.J.: Introduction to Operations Research. 11th Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2014.

Schira, J.: Statistische Methoden der VWL und BWL - Theorie und Praxis. 5. Auflage, Pearson Verlag 2016.

Zudem: Skript und Unterlagen, die  zur Vorlesung herausgegeben werden.

Module M1002: Production and Logistics Management

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Operative Production and Logistics Management (L1198) Lecture 2 2
Strategic Production and Logistics Management (L1089) Project-/problem-based Learning 3 4
Module Responsible Prof. Wolfgang Kersten
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Introduction to Business and Management


The previous knowledge, that is necessary for the successful participation in this module is accessable via e-learning. Log-in and additional information will be distributed during the admission process.

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

 Students will be able
-    to differentiate between strategic and operational production and logistics management,
-    to describe the areas of production and logistics management,
-    understand the difference between traditional and new concepts of production planning and control,
-    to describe and explain the actual challenges and research areas of production and logistics management, esp. in an international context.


Skills
Based on the acquired knowledge students are capable of

-    Applying methods of production and logistics management in an international context,
-    Selecting sufficient methods of production and logistics management to solve practical problems,
-    Selecting appropriate methods of production and logistics management also for non-standardized problems,
-    Making a holistic assessment of areas of decision in production and logistics management and relevant influence factors,

-    Design a production and logistics strategy and a global manufacturing footprint systematically.

Personal Competence
Social Competence After completion of the module students can
-    lead discussions and team sessions,
-    arrive at work results in groups and document them,
-    develop joint solutions in mixed teams and present them to others,
-    present solutions to specialists and develop ideas further.
Autonomy

After completion of the module students can

- assess possible consequences of their professional activity,

- define tasks independently, acquire the requisite knowledge and use suitable means of implementation,

- define and carry out research tasks bearing in mind possible societal consequences.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes 2.5 % Excercises Online-Modul
No 15 % Subject theoretical and practical work PBL
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Bioprocess Engineering: Specialisation C - Bioeconomic Process Engineering, Focus Management and Controlling: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Core qualification: Compulsory
Course L1198: Operative Production and Logistics Management
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Thorsten Blecker
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Further knowledge of operational production management
  • Traditional production planning and control concepts
  • Recent production planning and control concepts
  • Understanding and application of quantitative methods
  • Further concepts regarding operational production management


Literature


Corsten, H.: Produktionswirtschaft: Einführung in das industrielle Produktionsmanagement, 12. Aufl., München 2009.

Dyckhoff, H./Spengler T.: Produktionswirtschaft: Eine Einführung, 3. Aufl., Berlin Heidelberg 2010.

Heizer, J./Render, B: Operations Management, 10. Auflage, Upper Saddle River 2011.

Kaluza, B./Blecker, Th. (Hrsg.): Produktions- und Logistikmanagement in Virtuellen Unternehmen und Unternehmensnetzwerken, Berlin et al. 2000.

Kaluza, B./Blecker, Th. (Hrsg.): Erfolgsfaktor Flexibilität. Strategien und Konzepte für wandlungsfähige Unternehmen, Berlin 2005.

Kurbel, K.: Produktionsplanung und ‑steuerung, 5., Aufl., München - Wien 2003.

Schweitzer, M.: Industriebetriebslehre, 2. Auflage, München 1994.

Thonemann, Ulrich (2005): Operations Management, 2. Aufl., München 2010.

Zahn, E./Schmid, U.: Produktionswirtschaft I: Grundlagen und operatives Produktionsmanagement, Stuttgart 1996

Zäpfel, G.: Grundzüge des Produktions- und Logistikmanagement, 2. Aufl., München - Wien 2001


Course L1089: Strategic Production and Logistics Management
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Wolfgang Kersten
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Identification of the scope of production, operations and logistics management
  • Understanding of actual challenges concerning production and logistics strategy
  • Understanding operations as a competitive weapon
  • Identification and design of the main elements of an operations strategy (level of vertical integration, technology strategy, location strategy, capacity strategy) of a company
  • Understanding of international conditions for the development of a production and logistics strategy
  • In depth discussion of different roles and design elements of a global manufacturing footprint
  • Evaluation of operation strategies of different companies and industrial sectors
  • In depth discussion of methods and concepts of production and logistics management
  • In depth discussion of lean management: Main goals and measures of lean management and lean production concepts, impact of lean management on production and logistics strategies
  • Analysis of the impact of digitalization on production and logistics strategies
  • Presentation and discussion of current research topics in the field of production and logistics management
  • Integration of Problem-Based-Learning sessions in order to enhance teamworking and problem solving skills as well as presentation skills


Literature

Arvis, J.-F. et al. (2018): Connecting to Compete - Trade Logistics in the Global Economy, Washington, DC, USA: The World Bank Group, Download: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/29971

Corsten, H. /Gössinger, R. (2016): Produktionswirtschaft - Einführung in das industrielle Produktionsmanagement, 14. Auflage, Berlin/ Boston: De Gruyter/ Oldenbourg.  

Heizer, J./ Render, B./ Munson, Ch. (2016): Operations Management (Global Edition), 12. Auflage, Pearson Education Ltd.: Harlow, England.

Kersten, W. et al. (2017): Chancen der digitalen Transformation. Trends und Strategien in Logistik und Supply Chain Management, Hamburg: DVV Media Group

Nyhuis, P./ Nickel, R./ Tullius, K. (2008): Globales Varianten Produktionssystem - Globalisierung mit System, Garbsen: Verlag PZH Produktionstechnisches Zentrum GmbH.

Porter, M. E. (2013): Wettbewerbsstrategie - Methoden zur Analyse von Branchen und Konkurrenten, 12. Auflage, Frankfurt/Main: CampusVerlag.

Schröder, M./ Wegner, K., Hrsg. (2019): Logistik im Wandel der Zeit - Von der Produktionssteuerung zu vernetzten Supply Chains, Wiesbaden: Springer Gabler

Slack, N./ Lewis, M. (2017): Operations Strategy, 5/e Pearson Education Ltd.: Harlow, England.

Swink, M./ Melnyk, S./ Cooper, M./ Hartley, J. (2011): Managing Operations across the Supply Chain, New York u.a.

Wortmann, J. C. (1992): Production management systems for one-of-a-kind products, Computers in Industry 19, S. 79-88

Womack, J./ Jones, D./ Roos, D. (1990): The Machine that changed the world; New York.

Zahn, E. /Schmid, U. (1996): Grundlagen und operatives Produktionsmanagement, Stuttgart:  Lucius & Lucius

Zäpfel, G.(2000): Produktionswirtschaft: Strategisches Produktions-Management, 2. Aufl., München u.a.


Module M0750: Economics

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
International Economics (L0700) Lecture 2 2
Main Theoretical and Political Concepts (L0641) Lecture 2 2
Economics (L2714) Project-/problem-based Learning 1 2
Module Responsible Prof. Timo Heinrich
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge of economics is expected.

The prior knowledge in the field of economics required for successful completion of this module is imparted as an e-learning offering. Students will receive access and further information on the associated online learning module when they enroll.

By taking an associated online test, the student can acquire points that are added to the result of the final examination of the Economics module.

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students know

  • the most important principles of individual decision making in a national and international context,
  • different market structures,
  • types of market failure,
  • the functioning of a single economy (including money market, financial and goods markets, labor market),
  • the difference between and the interdependence of short and long run equilibria,
  • the significance of expectations on the effects of economic policy,
  • the various links between economies and
  • different economic policies (trade, monetary, fiscal and exchange rate policy) and their effects on the home and foreign economies.
Skills

The students are able to model analytically or graphically

  • the most important principles of individual decision making in a national and international context,
  • the market results of different market structures and market failure,
  • the welfare effects of the market results,
  • the functioning of an economy (including money market, financial and goods markets, labor market),
  • links between economies and
  • the effects of economic policies (trade, monetary, fiscal and exchange rate policies).
Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able

  • to anticipate expectations and decisions of individuals or groups of individuals. These may be inside or outside of the own firm,
  • to take these decisions into account while deciding themselves and
  • to understand the behavior of markets and to assess the opportunities and risks with respect to the own business activities.
Autonomy

With the methods taught the students will be able

  • to analyze empirical phenomena in single economies and the world economy and to reconcile them with the studied theoretical concepts and
  • to design, analyze and evaluate micro- and macroeconomic policies against the background of different models.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes 33 % Presentation
Yes 5 % Excercises
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Management: Elective Compulsory
Course L0700: International Economics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Timo Heinrich
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • International Trade Theory and Policy: 
    • Comparative Advantage - the Ricardian Model
    • The Heckscher-Ohlin Model
    • The Standard Trade Model
    • Intrasectoral Trade
    • International Trade Policy
  • Open Economy Macroeconomics:
    • The Foreign Exchange Market
    • Determinants of Prices, Interest Rates, Exchange Rates, Output in the Short Run
    • Determinants of Prices, Interest Rates, Exchange Rates, Output in the Long Run
    • Monetary and Fiscal and Exchange Rate Policies in Open Economies in the Long and the Short Run
Literature
  • Mankiw/Taylor: Economics, Cengage, 5th ed., 2020
  • Krugman/Obstfeld/Mehlitz: International Economics, Pearson, 11th ed. 2018
  • The CORE Team: The Economy: Economics for a Changing World, Oxford University Press, 2017
Course L0641: Main Theoretical and Political Concepts
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Timo Heinrich
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Introduction: Ten Principles of Economics
  • Microeconomics:
    • Theory of the Household
    • Theory of the Firm
    • Competitive Markets in Equilibrium
    • Market Failure: Monopoly and External Effects
    • Government Policies
  • Macroeconomics:
    • A Nation’s Real Income and Production
    • The Real Economy in the Long Run: Capital and Labour Market
    • Money and Prices in the Long Run
    • Aggregate Demand and Supply: Short-Run Economic Fluctuations
    • Monetary and Fiscal Policy in the Short and the Long Run


Literature
  • Mankiw/Taylor: Economics, Cengage, 5th ed., 2020
  • Pindyck/Rubinfeld, Microceconomics, Pearson, 9th ed., 2018
  • The CORE Team: The Economy: Economics for a Changing World, Oxford University Press, 2017




Course L2714: Economics
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Timo Heinrich
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

Students work in teams on in-depth questions related to the contents of the lectures and present the results.

Literature
  • Mankiw/Taylor: Economics, Cengage, 5th ed., 2020
  • Krugman/Obstfeld/Mehlitz: International Economics, Pearson, 11th ed. 2018
  • Pindyck/Rubinfeld, Microceconomics, Pearson, 9th ed., 2018
  • The CORE Team: The Economy: Economics for a Changing World, Oxford University Press, 2017

Module M1734: Organization and IT of international companies and supply chains

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Logistics and Information Technology (L0065) Lecture 2 3
Organization and Process Management (L1217) Project-/problem-based Learning 3 3
Module Responsible Prof. Wolfgang Kersten
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Foundations of business administration and foundations of logistics 

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students acquire knowledge of:

  • Information systems in logistics and supply chain management as well as critical appraisal of potentials against the background of solid theoretical knowledge
  • Case studies and new technical developments in IT from practice
  • Relevance of information in international companies and supply chains
  • Theoretical knowledge and application of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)
  • Basics and examples of a process-oriented company organization
  • Design possibilities of the process-oriented structure of organizations for the efficient design of company processes; transfer to nationally and internationally operating practical companies
  • Possibilities of structuring internal and cross-company forms of organization as well as transfer of the theoretically acquired knowledge to examples of international corporate practice; discussion of their applicability in the company as well as considerations of success
  • Possibilities of co-determination on the part of employees and employers in the company; critical discussion and reflection on the legal basis using current examples in corporate practice to promote responsible action
  • Basics on the topics of corporate culture and knowledge management as well as possibilities for shaping them in company practice
  • Digitalization and associated opportunities and challenges for the organization and process management of international companies and supply chains
Skills

Students acquire the following skills:

  • Apply theoretical content, approaches and models of organizational theory and process management
  • Analyze potentials and challenges of digitalization on the organization of international companies and supply chains
  • Evaluate national and international empirical studies in relation to organization and IT in companies and their supply chains
  • Evaluation of the relevance of the availability of information in international companies and supply chains
  • Design and analysis of the process-oriented structure of organizations for the efficient design of corporate processes; transfer to nationally and internationally operating practical companies
  • Weighing up the advantages and disadvantages of process management; developing approaches for its optimization 
  • Discussion of practical issues on the basis of theoretical findings or creation of a practical reference through examples and case studies
  • Identification and tracking of technical developments from practice as well as assessment with reference to international companies and supply chains 
  • Independent analysis of case studies relevant to the lecture; joint elaboration and development of problem-solving proposals within the framework of intercultural teamwork; preparation of results with the aid of modern presentation media
Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to

  • work out and develop joint problem-solving proposals within the framework of intercultural teamwork and prepare the results with the help of modern presentation media;
  • to lead subject-specific and interdisciplinary discussions;
  • to represent work results, also in English.
Autonomy

Students are able to

  • independently acquire subject-specific knowledge from the literature, discuss its applicability in the company and weigh up the prospects of success.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Course L0065: Logistics and Information Technology
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Thorsten Blecker
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  •   Basics of Logistics and Supply Chain Management
  •   Basis of Information Management
  •   Basics of Information Systems
  •   Empirical Studies Related to IT in Supply Chains
  •   Relevance of Information in the Supply Chain
  •   Logistics Information Systems
  •   Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)
  •   E-Logistics
  •   Electronic Sourcing
  •   E-Supply Chains
  •   Case Studies and New Technical Developments


Literature
  • Kummer, S./Einbock, M., Westerheide, C.: RFID in der Logistik - Handbuch für die Praxis, Wien 2005.

Pepels, W. (Hsg.): E-Business-Anwendungen in der Betriebswirtschaft, Herne/Berlin 2002.

Reindl, M./Oberniedermaier, G.: eLogistics: Logistiksysteme und -prozesse im Internetzeitalter, München et al. 2002.

Schulte, C.: Logistik, 5. Auflage, München 2009

Wildemann, H.: Logistik Prozessmanagement, 4. Aufl., München 2009.

Wildemann H. (Hsg.): Supply Chain Management, München 2000.


Course L1217: Organization and Process Management
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Wolfgang Kersten
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Fundamentals of a process-oriented company organization
  • Analysis of process-oriented business structures for efficient configuration of operational workflows; application to national and international examples from the industry
  • Description and comparative analysis of possible organizational forms and transfer into the international practice; opportunities to organize a company in practice; pros and cons of different organizational forms 
  • Analysis of possible cooperation forms between companies and applications in the industry
  • Development of different participation types for employers and employees within the company; discussion and reflection of legal principles based on practical examples
  • Description of the basics concerning corporate culture and knowledge management, as well as options for the practical implementation 
  • Weighing up the pros and cons of process management; development of optimization options
  • Digitalization and process management, related requirements for change management
  • Digitalization and corporate culture including an analysis of different international preconditions
  • Integration of problem based learning sessions to work on relevant case studies; joint development of possible problem solving solutions within intercultural teams; preparation of the results with modern presentation methods
Literature
  • Becker, J. / Kugeler, M. / Rosemann, M. (2012): Prozessmanagement: Ein Leitfaden zur prozessorientierten Organisationsgestaltung, 7. Aufl., Berlin.
  • Bullinger, H.-J. / Warnecke, H. J. (2003): Neue Organisationsformen im Unternehmen, 2. Auflage, Berlin.
  • Corsten, H., Gössinger, R., Spengler, Th. (Hrsg., 2018): Handbuch Produktions- und Logistikmanagement in Wertschöpfungsnetzwerken, Berlin/Boston
  • Eversheim, W. (2005): Integrierte Produkt- und Prozessgestaltung, Heidelberg.
  • Gaitanides, M. (2007): Prozessorganisation: Entwicklung, Ansätze und Programme des Managements von Geschäftsprozessen, 2. Auflage, München. 
  • Hopfenbeck, W. (2002): Allgemeine Betriebswirtschafts- und Managementlehre - das Unternehmen im Spannungsfeld zwischen ökonomischen, sozialen und ökologischen Interessen, 14. Auflage, München.
  • Kersten, W.; Koller, H.; Lödding, H. (Hrsg.): Industrie 4.0. Wie intelligente Vernetzung und kognitive Systeme unsere Arbeit verändern. Berlin 2014
  • Kersten, W. et al. (2017): Chancen der digitalen Transformation. Trends und Strategien in Logistik und Supply Chain Management, Bremen
  • Obermaier, Robert (Hrsg., 2019): Handbuch Industrie 4.0 und Digitale Transformation: Betriebswirtschaftliche, technische und rechtliche Herausforderungen, Wiesbaden
  • Porter, M. (1999): Wettbewerbsstrategie (competitive strategy): Methoden zur Analyse von Branchen und Konkurrenten, 10. Auflage, Frankfurt.
  • Schreyögg, G. (2008): Organisation. Grundlagen moderner Organisationsgestaltung. 5. Auflage. GWV Fachverlag. Wiesbaden
  • Wöhe, G. (2020): Einführung in die Allgemeine Betriebswirtschaftslehre, 27. Aufl., München.

Module M1733: Foundations in Organizational Design and Human Resource Management

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Foundations in Organizational Design and Human Resource Management (Seminar) (L2800) Seminar 2 3
Foundations in Organizational Design and Human Resource Management (Lecture) (L2799) Lecture 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Christian Ringle
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge on academic writing as well as principles and concepts in business administration.

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students will be able to…

  • Explain the core elements and practices of an effective organizational design;
  • Describe key components of human resource management (e.g., personnel planning, employee testing, training & development) throughout national and international organizations;
  • Comprehend the meaning and importance of managing human resources in multinational companies and its relation to organizational designs and strategies;
  • Use adequate data and quantitative methods for decision making in organizational design and human resource management;
  • Identify critical success in organizations and conduct human resource analytics.
Skills

Students will be able to...

  • Apply theoretical knowledge to practical examples;
  • Write a scientific seminar thesis;
  • Appropriately present results of their work to others, both in terms of a thesis and oral presentations.
Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students will be able to...

  • Respectfully work in teams;
  • Have fruitful group discussions;
  • Present their results in written form and oral presentations.
Autonomy

The students will be able to…

  • Independently gather knowledge on specific topics;
  • Critically evaluate and discuss this information;
  • Transfer the acquired knowledge to practical applications.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Course L2800: Foundations in Organizational Design and Human Resource Management (Seminar)
Typ Seminar
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Christian Ringle
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

This course is structured as a lecture and a seminar. The lecture focuses on gaining an understanding of the fundamentals of human resource management and organizational design. The lecture also introduces quantitative and business analytics methods for decision making in the field. In the lecture, the basic theoretical concepts are explained and discussed, whereas they are applied through the preparation of a seminar thesis in the seminar.

Organizational Design & Human Resource Management

  • The processes of developing organizational structures for small and mid-sized corporations as well as for large multinational enterprises;
  • The adaptation of organizations and their structures to the competitive environment, with special focus on international operating organizations and global markets;
  • Introduction to human resource management from a strategic and international perspective (incl. the typical challenges of international organizations);
  • Key elements of human resource management (incl. design of work, employee recruitment, development, separation & retention);
  • Introduction of methods and models for decision making in organizational design and human resource management.

Possible Applications of the Theoretical Concepts

  • Big data in organizations and human resource analytics;
  • Business analytics and machine learning methods (e.g., factor analysis, regression analysis, and structural equation modeling);
  • Models for the management of organizations and human resource management (e.g., job satisfaction and turnover intention, motivation and organizational commitment).
Literature

This course is structured as a lecture and a seminar. The lecture focuses on gaining an understanding of the fundamentals of human resource management and organizational design. The lecture also introduces quantitative and business analytics methods for decision making in the field. In the lecture, the basic theoretical concepts are explained and discussed, whereas they are applied through the preparation of a seminar thesis in the seminar.

Organizational Design & Human Resource Management

  • The processes of developing organizational structures for small and mid-sized corporations as well as for large multinational enterprises;
  • The adaptation of organizations and their structures to the competitive environment, with special focus on international operating organizations and global markets;
  • Introduction to human resource management from a strategic and international perspective (incl. the typical challenges of international organizations);
  • Key elements of human resource management (incl. design of work, employee recruitment, development, separation & retention);
  • Introduction of methods and models for decision making in organizational design and human resource management.

Possible Applications of the Theoretical Concepts

  • Big data in organizations and human resource analytics;
  • Business analytics and machine learning methods (e.g., factor analysis, regression analysis, and structural equation modeling);
  • Models for the management of organizations and human resource management (e.g., job satisfaction and turnover intention, motivation and organizational commitment).
Course L2799: Foundations in Organizational Design and Human Resource Management (Lecture)
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Christian Ringle
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

This course is structured as a lecture and a seminar. The lecture focuses on gaining an understanding of the fundamentals of human resource management and organizational design. The lecture also introduces quantitative and business analytics methods for decision making in the field. In the lecture, the basic theoretical concepts are explained and discussed, whereas they are applied through the preparation of a seminar thesis in the seminar.

Organizational Design & Human Resource Management

  • The processes of developing organizational structures for small and mid-sized corporations as well as for large multinational enterprises;
  • The adaptation of organizations and their structures to the competitive environment, with special focus on international operating organizations and global markets;
  • Introduction to human resource management from a strategic and international perspective (incl. the typical challenges of international organizations);
  • Key elements of human resource management (incl. design of work, employee recruitment, development, separation & retention);
  • Introduction of methods and models for decision making in organizational design and human resource management.

Possible Applications of the Theoretical Concepts

  • Big data in organizations and human resource analytics;
  • Business analytics and machine learning methods (e.g., factor analysis, regression analysis, and structural equation modeling);
  • Models for the management of organizations and human resource management (e.g., job satisfaction and turnover intention, motivation and organizational commitment).
Literature

Textbooks

  • Bernardin, H. J. (2006): Human Resource Management: An Experiential Approach, 4e, New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.
  • Cascio, W. (2015): Managing Human Resources: Productivity, Quality of Work Life, Profits, revised edition, New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.
  • Dessler, G. (2012): A Framework for Human Resource Management, 7 ed., Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
  • French, W., Bell, C. H., Zawacki, R. A. (2004): Organization Development and Transformation: Managing Effective Change, 6e, Chicago, IL: McGraw-Hill.
  • Gibson, J. L., Ivancevich, J. M., Donnelly, J. H., & Konopaske, R. (2011): Organizations: Behavior, Structure, Processes, 14 ed., New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.
  • Jones, G. R. (2012): Organizational Theory, Design, and Change, 7 ed., Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
  • Noe, R. A., Hollenbeck, J. R., Gerhart, B., Wright, P. M. (2021): Human Resource Management: Gaining a Competitive Advantage, 12 ed., New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Methods

  • Hair, J. F., Black, W. C., Babin, B. J. and Anderson, R. E. (2018): Multivariate Data Analysis, Mason, OH: Cengage.
  • Hair, J. F., Hult, G. T. M., Ringle, C. M. and Sarstedt, M. (2021); A Primer on Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM), 3 ed., Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Academic writing

  • Davis, M., Davis K. J., & Dunagan, M. M. (2013): Scientific Papers and Presentations. Academic Press.
  • Katz, M. J. (2009): From Research to Manuscript: A Guide to Scientific Writing. Dordrecht: Springer.

Module M0916: Project Seminar IWI

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Project Seminar IWI (L1064) Project Seminar 3 6
Module Responsible Prof. Kathrin Fischer
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Prior knowledge in the relevant area from the relevant Management modules.
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge The knowledge and the skills which are gained in this module differ depending on the topic of the seminar. In all cases, in-depth knowledge of a certain scientific area and the respective skills are developed by the students, e.g. in-depth knowledge of complexity management in production, in-depth knowledge of the application of simulations in Controlling or in-depth knowledge of specific problems in Strategic Management or Marketing, and the respective skills, e.g. the ability to judge and select different approaches to certain strategic planning problems and to apply them successfully. Hence, the seminar is strongly research oriented.
Skills

Students are able to

  • independently acquire the relevant knowledge to handle their project
  • independently carry out a (pre-defined) complex research task and/or solve a complex problem
  • select and use the relevant literature and critically evaluate it
  • aggregate their knowledge and results and present it to others
  • write a scientific report on the project / problem at hand, individually or in a team.
Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to

  • work respectfully and successfully in a team, organize the team, and solve complex tasks in a team in a given timeframe
  • analyse a problem in a team and develop a solution for the problem 
  • present the results of their work to specialists.


Autonomy

Students are able to

  • define the scope of their project
  • independently acquire relevant scientific knowledge 
  • independently carry out a (pre-defined) complex research task
  • independently prepare a presentation of the relevant aspects of the project.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 138, Study Time in Lecture 42
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written elaboration
Examination duration and scale To be announced in seminar.
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Course L1064: Project Seminar IWI
Typ Project Seminar
Hrs/wk 3
CP 6
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 138, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Kathrin Fischer
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe/SoSe
Content Contents differ, depending on the institute which organizes the respective seminar. Topics are always announced at the start of the term.
Literature

Wird je nach Thema angegeben; in der Regel handelt es sich um wissenschaftliche Fachartikel und Publikationen, vorwiegend in englischer Sprache.


Specialization I. Electives Management

Module M0855: Marketing (Sales and Services / Innovation Marketing)

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Marketing of Innovations (L2009) Lecture 4 4
PBL Marketing of Innovations (L0862) Project-/problem-based Learning 1 2
Module Responsible Prof. Christian Lüthje
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Module International Business
  • Basic understanding of business administration principles (strategic planning, decision theory, project management, international business)
  • Bachelor-level Marketing Knowledge (Marketing Instruments, Market and Competitor Strategies, Basics of Buying Behavior)
  • Unerstanding the differences beweetn B2B and B2C marketing
  • Understanding of the importance of managing innovation in global industrial markets
  • Good English proficiency; presentation skills
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

 Students will have gained a deep understanding of

  • Specific characteristics in the marketing of innovative poroducts and services
  • Approaches for analyzing the current market situation and the future market development
  • The gathering of information about future customer needs and requirements
  • Concepts and approaches to integrate lead users and their needs into product and service development processes
  • Approaches and tools for ensuring customer-orientation in the development of new products and innovative services
  • Marketing mix elements that take into consideration the specific requirements and challenges of innovative products and services
  • Pricing methods for new products and services
  • The organization of complex sales forces and personal selling
  • Communication concepts and instruments for new products and services
Skills

Based on the acquired knowledge students will be able to:

  • Design and to evaluate decisions regarding marketing and innovation strategies
  • Analyze markets by applying market and technology portfolios
  • Conduct forecasts and develop compelling scenarios as a basis for strategic planning
  • Translate customer needs into concepts, prototypes and marketable offers and successfully apply advanced methods for customer-oriented product and service development
  • Use adequate methods to foster efficient diffusion of innovative products and services
  • Choose suitable pricing strategies and communication activities for innovations
  • Make strategic sales decisions for products and services (i.e. selection of sales channels)
  • Apply methods of sales force management (i.e. customer value analysis) 
Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students will be able to

  • have fruitful discussions and exchange arguments
  • develop original results in a group
  • present results in a clear and concise way
  • carry out respectful team work
Autonomy

The students will be able to

  • Acquire knowledge independently in the specific context and to map this knowledge on other new complex problem fields.
  • Consider proposed business actions in the field of marketing and reflect on them.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Subject theoretical and practical work
Examination duration and scale Written elaboration, excercises, presentation, oral participation
Assignment for the Following Curricula Global Technology and Innovation Management & Entrepreneurship: Core qualification: Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation I. Electives Management: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Management: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Compulsory
Course L2009: Marketing of Innovations
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 4
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 64, Study Time in Lecture 56
Lecturer Prof. Christian Lüthje
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

I. Introduction

  • Innovation and service marketing (importance of innovative products and services, model, objectives and examples of innovation marketing, characteristics of services, challenges of service marketing)
II. Methods and approaches of strategic marketing planning
  • patterns of industrial development, patent and technology portfolios
III. Strategic foresight and scenario analysis
  • objectives and challenges of strategic foresight, scenario analysis, Delphi method
 IV. User innovations
  • Role of users in the innovation process, user communities, user innovation toolkits, lead users analysis
V. Customer-oriented Product and Service Engineering
  • Conjoint Analysis, Kano, QFD, Morphological Analysis, Blueprinting
VII. Pricing
  • Basics of Pricing, Value-based pricing, Pricing models
VIII. Sales Management
  • Basics of Sales Management, Assessing Customer Value, Planning Customer Visits
IX. Communications
  • Diffusion of Innovations, Communication Objectives, Communication Instruments
Literature

Mohr, J., Sengupta, S., Slater, S. (2014). Marketing of high-technology products and innovations, third edition, Pearson education. ISBN-10: 1292040335 . Chapter 6 (188-210), Chapter 7 (227-256), Chapter 10 (352-365), Chapter 12 (419-426).

Crawford, M., Di Benedetto, A. (2008). New  products management, 9th edition, McGrw Hill, Boston et al., 2008

Christensen, C. M. (1997). Innovator's Dilemma: When New Technologies Cause Great Firms to Fail, Harvard Business Press, Chapter 1: How can great firms fail?,pp. 3-24.

Hair, J. F., Bush, R. P., Ortinau, D. J. (2009). Marketing research. 4th edition, Boston et al., McGraw Hill

Tidd; J. & Hull, Frank M. (Editors) (2007) Service Innovation, London

Von Hippel, E.(2005). Democratizing Innovation, Cambridge: MIT Press

Course L0862: PBL Marketing of Innovations
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Christian Lüthje
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content This PBL course is seggregated into two afternoon sessions. This cours aims at enhancing the students’ practical skills in (1) forecasting the future development of markets and (2) making appropriate market-related decisions (particularly segmentation, managing the marketing mix). The students will be prompted to use the knowledge gathered in the lecture of this module and will be invited to (1) Conduct a scenario analysis for an innovative product category and (2) Engage in decision making wtihin a market simulation game.
Literature

Module M0996: Supply Chain Management

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Supply Chain Management (L1218) Project-/problem-based Learning 3 4
Value-Adding Networks (L1190) Lecture 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Thorsten Blecker
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge no
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

 Current developments in international business activities such as outsourcing, offshoring, internationalization and globalization and emerging markets illustrated by examples from practice.
• Theoretical Approaches and methods in logistics and supply chain management and use in practice.
• to identify fields of decision in SCM .
• reasons for the formation of networks based on various theories from institutional economics (transaction cost theory, principal-agent theory, property-right theory) and the resource-based view.
• Selected approaches to explain the development of networks.
• to illustrate phases of network formation.
• to understand the functional mechanisms of inter-organizational and international network relationships.
• to explain and categorize relationships within networks.
• to categorize sourcing concepts and explain motives/ barriers or advantages and disadvantages.
• advantages and disadvantages of offshoring and outsourcing and to illustrate the distinction between the two terms .
• to state criteria/ factors/ parameters that influence production location decisions at the global level (total network costs).
• to explain methods for location finding/evaluation.
• to interpret phenotypes of production networks.
• recognize relationships between R & D and production and their locations and to describe coherent models.
• to solve sub-problems with the configuration of logistics networks (distribution and spare parts networks ) by the use of appropriate approaches.
• to categorise special waste logistics including their duties & objectives and to state and describe practical examples of good networking.

Skills

• to asses trends and challenges in national and international supply chains and logistics networks and their consequences for companies.
• to evaluate, anaylse and systematise networks and network relations based on the lecture.
• to anaylse partners and their suitability for co-operation in collaborations and cooperative relations.
• to select sourcing concepts for specific products / product components based on the lecture as well as advantages and disadvantages of each approach.
• to evaluate location decisions for production and R & D based on concepts.
• to recognize relationships between R & D and production as well as their locations and to evaluate the suitability of specific models for different situations.
• to transfer the analyzed concepts to international practices.
• to analyse and evaluate the product development processes.
• to anaylse concepts of Information and communication management  in logistics.
• to design subcontracting, procurement, production and disposal as well as R & D networks to shape,
• to plan reorganise efficient and flow-oriented enterprise networks.
• to adopt methods of complexity management and risk management in logistics.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

• to evaluate intercultural and international relationships based on discussed case studies.
• advance planning  and design of network formation and their objectives based on content discussed in the lecture.
• definition of procurement strategies for individual parts using the gained knowledge of procurement networks.
• design of the procurement network (external/internal/modules etc.) based on the sourcing concepts and core competencies, as well as on the findings of the case studies.
• to make decision of location for production taking into account global contexts, evaluation methods and buying/selling markets, which were also discussed in the case studies and their dependence on R & D.
• Decision on R & D locations based on the insights gained from case studies / practical examples and the selection of an appropriate model.

Autonomy

After completing the module students are capable to work independently on the subject of Supply Chain Management and transfer the acquired knowledge to new problems.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
No 15 % Subject theoretical and practical work im Rahmen der Lehrveranstaltung "Supply Chain Management"
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Bioprocess Engineering: Specialisation C - Bioeconomic Process Engineering, Focus Management and Controlling: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation I. Electives Management: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Production and Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Course L1218: Supply Chain Management
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Wolfgang Kersten
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Vermittlung eines tiefgreifenden Verständnisses von Logistik und Supply Chain Management 
  • Vermittlung umfassender theoretischer Ansätze und Methoden in der Logistik und im Supply Chain Management; Übertragung der analysierten Konzepte auf Praxisbeispiele
  • Ausarbeitung und kritische Diskussion unterschiedlicher Supply Chain Konfigurationen sowie strategischer Supply Chain Ansätze (z.B. Effizienz vs. Reaktionsfähigkeit)
  • Einführung in die Managementprozesse des SCOR-Modells; Vermittlung von Konzepten der Bereiche Planung, Beschaffung/Einkauf und Distribution
  • Vermittlung von Grundlagen des Supply Chain Risikomanagements; Übertragung der Konzepte auf Praxisbeispiele 
  • Einführung in die digitale Transformation; Identifikation von Trends und Strategien in der Logistik und Supply Chain Management; Ableitung von Chancen der digitalen Transformation in der Logistik und Supply Chain Management
  • Einführung in die Datenanalyse und -visualisierung mithilfe eines Tools; Anwenden der Kenntnisse auf Themengebiete in der Logistik und Supply Chain Management; Aufbereitung der Ergebnisse mit Hilfe moderner Präsentationsmedien


Literature

Bowersox, D. J., Closs, D. J. und Cooper, M. B. (2010): Supply chain logistics management, 3rd edition, Boston [u.a.]: McGraw-Hill/Irwin. 

Chopra, S. und Meindl, P. (2016): Supply chain management: strategy, planning, and operation, 6th edition, Boston [u.a.]: Pearson. 

Corsten, H., Gössinger, R. (2007): Einführung in das Supply Chain Management, 2. Aufl., München/Wien: Oldenbourg.

Corsten, H., Gössinger, R., Spengler, Th. (Hrsg., 2018): Handbuch Produktions- und Logistikmanagement in Wertschöpfungsnetzwerken, Berlin/Boston.

Heiserich O., Helbig, K. und Ullmann, W. (2011): Logistik, 4. vollständig überarbeitete und erweiterte Auflage, Wiesbaden: Gabler Verlag/ Springer Fachmedien.

Heizer, J., Render, B., Munson, Ch. (2020): Principles of Operations Management, 11th edition, Boston: Pearson.

Hugos, M. (2018): Essentials of Supply Chain Management, Wiley.

Fisher, M. (1997): What is the right supply chain for your product?, Harvard Business Review, Vol. 75, No. pp., S. 105-117. 

Kersten, W. Seiter, M., von See, B, and Hackius, N. und Maurer, T. (2017): Trends und Strategien in Logistik und Supply Chain Management: Chancen der digitalen Transformation, DVV Media Group GmbH: Hamburg.

Kuhn, A. und Hellingrath, B. (2002): Supply Chain Management: optimierte Zusammenarbeit in der Wertschöpfungskette, Berlin [u.a.]: Springer.

Larson, P., Poist, R. and Halldórsson, Á. (2007): Perspectives on logistics vs. SCM: a survey of SCM professionals, in: Journal of Business Logistics, Vol. 28, No. 1, S. 1-24.

Kummer, S., Grün, O. und Jammernegg, W. (2018): Grundzüge der Beschaffung, Produktion und Logistik, 4. aktualisierte Auflage, München: Pearson Studium.

Obermaier, Robert (Hrsg., 2019): Handbuch Industrie 4.0 und Digitale Transformation: Betriebswirtschaftliche, technische und rechtliche Herausforderungen, Wiesbaden.

Porter, M. (1986): Changing Patterns of International Competition, California Management Review, Vol. 28, No. 2, S. 9-40. 

Schröder, M./ Wegner, K., Hrsg. (2019): Logistik im Wandel der Zeit - Von der Produktionssteuerung zu vernetzten Supply Chains, Wiesbaden: Springer Gabler

Simchi-Levi, D., Kaminsky, P. und Simchi-Levi, E. (2008): Designing and managing the supply chain: concepts, strategies and case studies, 3rd edition, Boston [u.a.]: McGraw-Hill/Irwin. 

Supply Chain Council (2014): Supply Chain Operations Reference (SCOR) model: Overview - Version 11.0.

Swink, M., Melnyk, S. A., Cooper, M. B. und Hartley, J. L. (2011): Managing Operations - Across the Supply Chain. 2nd edition, New York, NY: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.

Weele , A. J. v. (2005): Purchasing & supply chain management, 4th edition, London [u.a.]: Thomson Learning.


Course L1190: Value-Adding Networks
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Thorsten Blecker
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Introduction: Overview of current trade flows and development of global business cooperation
  • Networks explanations using neo institutional approaches as a theoretical basis
  • Networks organization and functioning
  • Development stages of networks
  • Presentation of different network types such as supplier, production, disposal and logistics network as well as their respective requirements, peculiarities and characteristics


Literature
  • Ballou, R. Business Logistics/Supply Chain Management, Upper Saddle River 2004.
  • Bellmann, K. (Hrsg.): Kooperations- und Netzwerkmanagement, Berlin 2001.
  • Bretzke, W.R.: Logistische Netzwerke, Berlin Heidelberg 2008.
  • Blecker, Th. / Gemünden, H. G. (Hrsg.): Wertschöpfungsnetzwerke, Berlin 2006.
  • Kaluza, B. / Blecker, Th. (Hrsg.): Produktions- und Logistikmanagement in virtuellen Unternehmen und Unternehmensnetzwerken, Berlin et al. 2000.
  • Sydow, J. / Möllering: Produktion in Netzwerken, Berlin 2009.
  • Willibald A. G. (Hrsg.): Neue Wege in der Automobillogistik, Berlin Heidelberg 2007.


Module M1034: Technology Entrepreneuship

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Creation of Business Opportunities (L1280) Project-/problem-based Learning 3 4
Entrepreneurship (L1279) Lecture 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Christoph Ihl
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge in business economics obtained in the compulsory modules as well as an interest in new technologies and the pursuit of new business opportunities either in corporate or startup contexts.


Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Wissen (subject-related knowledge and understanding):

  • develop a working knowledge and understanding of the entrepreneurial perspective
  • understand the difference between a good idea and scalable business opportunity
  • understand the process of taking a technology idea and finding a high-potential commercial opportunity
  • understand the components of business models
  • understand the components of business opportunity assessment and business plans


Skills
  • Fertigkeiten (subject-related skills):

    • identify and define business opportunities
    • assess and validate entrepreneurial opportunities
    • create and verify a business model of how to sell and market an entrepreneurial opportunity
    • formulate and test business model assumptions and hypotheses
    • conduct customer and expert interviews regarding business opportunities
    • prepare business opportunity assessment
    • create and verify a plan for gathering resources such as talent and capital
    • pitch a business opportunity to your classmates and the teaching team

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Sozialkompetenz (Social Competence):

  • team work
  • communication and presentation
  • give and take critical comments
  • engaging in fruitful discussions
Autonomy

Selbständigkeit (Autonomy):

  • autonomous work and time management
  • project management
  • analytical skills

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Subject theoretical and practical work
Examination duration and scale Three presentations on the respective project status
Assignment for the Following Curricula Global Technology and Innovation Management & Entrepreneurship: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation I. Electives Management: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Management: Elective Compulsory
Course L1280: Creation of Business Opportunities
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Christoph Ihl, Dr. Hannes Lampe
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

Important note: This course is part of an 6 ECTS module consisting of two courses "Entrepreneurship” & “Creation of Business Opportunities”, which have to be taken together in one semester.

Startups are temporary, team-based organizations, which can form both within and outside of established companies, to pursue one central objective: taking a new venture idea to market by designing a business model that can be scaled to a full-grown company. In this course, students will form startup teams around self-selected ideas and run through the process just like real startups would do in the first three months of intensive work. Startup Engineering takes an incremental and iterative approach, in that it favors variety and alternatives over one detailed, linear five-year business plan to reach steady state operations. From a problem solving and systems thinking perspective, student teams create different possible versions of a new venture and alternative hypotheses about value creation for customers and value capture vis-à-vis competitors. We will draw on recent scientific findings about international success factors of new venture design. To test critical hypotheses early on, student teams engage in scientific, evidence-based, experimental trial-and-error learning process that measures real progress.
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
· Apply a modern innovation toolkit relevant in both the corporate & startup world
· Analyze given business opportunities in terms of its constituent elements
· Design new business models by gathering and combining relevant ideas, facts and information 
· Evaluate business opportunities and derive judgment about next steps & decisions
Course language is English, but participants can decide to give their graded presentations in German. Students are invited to apply to this course module already with a startup idea and/ or team, but this is not a requirement! We will form teams and ideas in the beginning of the course. Class meetings have alternate intervals of lecture inputs, teamwork, mentoring, and peer feedback. Attendance is mandatory for at least 80% of class time due to large proportion of teamwork sessions.
Student teams give three presentations and submit them with backup analyses. Grading scheme:
· Startup discovery presentation after 5 weeks: 30%
· Startup validation presentation after 10 weeks: 30%
· Final startup pitches after 13 weeks: 40%


Literature

• Blank, S. & Dorf, B. (2012). The startup owner's manual.
• Gans, J. & Stern, S. (2016). Entrepreneurial Strategy.
• Osterwalder, A. & Yves, P. (2010). Business model generation.
• Maurya, A. (2012). Running lean: Iterate from plan A to a plan that works.
• Maurya, A. (2016). Scaling lean: Mastering the Key Metrics for Startup Growth.
• Wilcox, J. (2016). FOCUS Framework: How to Find Product-Market Fit.

Course L1279: Entrepreneurship
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Christoph Ihl
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

Important note: This course is part of an 6 ECTS module consisting of two courses "Entrepreneurship” & “Creation of Business Opportunities”, which have to be taken together in one semester.

Startups are temporary, team-based organizations, which can form both within and outside of established companies, to pursue one central objective: taking a new venture idea to market by designing a business model that can be scaled to a full-grown company. In this course, students will form startup teams around self-selected ideas and run through the process just like real startups would do in the first three months of intensive work. Startup Engineering takes an incremental and iterative approach, in that it favors variety and alternatives over one detailed, linear five-year business plan to reach steady state operations. From a problem solving and systems thinking perspective, student teams create different possible versions of a new venture and alternative hypotheses about value creation for customers and value capture vis-à-vis competitors. We will draw on recent scientific findings about international success factors of new venture design. To test critical hypotheses early on, student teams engage in scientific, evidence-based, experimental trial-and-error learning process that measures real progress.
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
· Apply a modern innovation toolkit relevant in both the corporate & startup world
· Analyze given business opportunities in terms of its constituent elements
· Design new business models by gathering and combining relevant ideas, facts and information 
· Evaluate business opportunities and derive judgment about next steps & decisions
Course language is English, but participants can decide to give their graded presentations in German. Students are invited to apply to this course module already with a startup idea and/ or team, but this is not a requirement! We will form teams and ideas in the beginning of the course. Class meetings have alternate intervals of lecture inputs, teamwork, mentoring, and peer feedback. Attendance is mandatory for at least 80% of class time due to large proportion of teamwork sessions.
Student teams give three presentations and submit them with backup analyses. Grading scheme:
· Startup discovery presentation after 5 weeks: 30%
· Startup validation presentation after 10 weeks: 30%
· Final startup pitches after 13 weeks: 40%


Literature

• Blank, S. & Dorf, B. (2012). The startup owner's manual.
• Gans, J. & Stern, S. (2016). Entrepreneurial Strategy.
• Osterwalder, A. & Yves, P. (2010). Business model generation.
• Maurya, A. (2012). Running lean: Iterate from plan A to a plan that works.
• Maurya, A. (2016). Scaling lean: Mastering the Key Metrics for Startup Growth.
• Wilcox, J. (2016). FOCUS Framework: How to Find Product-Market Fit.



Module M0558: Business Optimization - Advanced Operations Research

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Business Optimization and Operations Research (L0155) Lecture 2 2
Project Modelling in Operations Research (L1793) Project-/problem-based Learning 1 1
Seminar Operations Research (L0156) Seminar 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Kathrin Fischer
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Knowledge from the module "Quantitative Methods": Linear Programming, Network Optimization and basics of Integer Programming.
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

After taking this module, students have an in-depth knowledge of the following areas: They are able to

  • explain complex quantitative models for applications, e.g. production models with integrated inventory holding over time, portfolio models, revenue management models
  • Discuss advanced topics in linear programming, e.g, duality theory and its application, special structures as upper/lower bounds for variables; revised simplex method etc.
  • Analyze problems with multiple objectives and under uncertainty, i.e. the adaption of linear programming models to realistic applications as e.g. international humanitarian logistics problems (distribution of relief goods);
  • Discuss advanced topics in integer programming: complex problems, e.g. from vehicle routing, and logical constraints; advanced  solutions procedures as branch and bound, cutting-plane procedures etc.
  • Examine dynamic and non-linear programming problems and applications in Management;
  • Solve OR problems using appropriate software;
  • Understand and explain OR reserach projects they learn about in the course.
Skills

Students have in-depth abilities in the following areas: They are able to

  • formulate complex quantitative models for applications, e.g. production models with integrated inventory holding over time, portfolio models, revenue management models
  • Apply duality theory in linear programming and analyze special structures as upper/lower bounds for variables; use the revised simplex method etc.
  • Analyze problems with multiple objectives and under uncertainty, i.e. the adaption of linear programming models to realistic applications
  • Set up advanced models in integer programming and solve them, e.g. problems from vehicle routing, or logical constraints
  • Analyze dynamic and non-linear programming problems and applications in Management
  • to understand a specified planning problem of OR research, to implement a solution and to document and explain their approach in a concise way.
Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to

  • work successfully in a team, organize the team, and solve complex tasks in a team in a given time frame
  • give structured feedback, following feedback rules, and also accept deeback from their fellow students
  • lead discussions on problems from the field of OR
  • present the results of their work to specialists.

Autonomy

Students are able to

  • independently acquire relevant scientific knowledge from the literature 
  • independently carry out a (pre-defined) complex research task
  • aggregate their knowledge and results and present it to others
  • apply their knowledge and experience also to new problems and unknown situations.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes 5 % Group discussion
Examination Subject theoretical and practical work
Examination duration and scale To be announced in Lecture
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Specialisation I. Electives Management: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Course L0155: Business Optimization and Operations Research
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Kathrin Fischer
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Complex quantitative models for applications, e.g. production models with integrated inventory holding over time, portfolio models, revenue management models
  • Advanced topics in linear programming, e.g, duality theory and its application, special structures as upper/lower bounds for variables; revised simplex method etc.
  • Problems with multiple objectives and under uncertainty: adaption of linear programming models to realistic applications
  • Topics from current OR research, e.g. from the field of humanitarian logistics and revenue management
  • Advanced topics in integer programming: Modelling complex problems, e.g. from vehicle routing, and logical constraints; advanced  solutions procedures as branch and bound, cutting-plane procedures etc.
  • Dynamic and non-linear programming and its applications in Management
  • Applications of models and methods in the area of supply chain management and logistics, e.g. in location planning etc.
Literature

Bücher:

Albright, C., Winston, W.: Management Science Modeling. Revised Third Edition, South-Western 2009.

Eiselt, H.A., Sandblom, C.-L.: Linear Programming and its Applications, Springer 2007.

Eiselt, H.A., Sandblom, C.-L.: Integer Programming and Network Models, Springer 2000.

Eiselt, H.A., Sandblom, C.-L.: Decision Analysis, Location Models, and Scheduling Problems, Springer 2004.

Suhl, L., Mellouli, T.: Optimierungssysteme. Springer, Berlin et al., 2. Auflage, 2009.

Williams, H.P.: Model Building in Mathematical Programming. 5th edition, Wiley & Sons, 2013.

Winston, W., Venkataramanan, M.: Mathematical Programming. Operations Research, Volume 1, 4th Edition, Thomson, London et al. 2003.

Sowie ein Skript, das zur Vorlesung herausgegeben wird.


Course L1793: Project Modelling in Operations Research
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Kathrin Fischer
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

In this course, students develop a computer-based realization for a business application problem in a team of students.

In particular, they are required to carry out the following steps:

  • Modeling the planning situation
  • Implementation and documentation
  • Generation of appropriate test data
  • Testing the implementation, sensitivity analyses etc.
  • Documentation of results and critical evaluation
Literature

Siehe Vorlesung Operations Research

Course L0156: Seminar Operations Research
Typ Seminar
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Kathrin Fischer
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

Special topics from different areas of the lecture are discussed in the seminar.

Students are required to use current publications from highly esteemed journals in their assignment and to write an essay on a relevant OR topic. Moreover, they have to prepare and give  a talk on that topic.

The seminar is research-oriented and focuses on relevant research topics from the field. Students get a first-hand experience in carrying out a research project in a well-defined, limited area of OR.

There is a limitation of  the number of seminar participants (36 students). If necessary, selection of participants will be based on the results in the Quantitative Methods module which is a prerequisite for this course.

Literature

Fachartikel (Journal Papers), die zu Beginn des Seminars bekanntgegeben werden.


Module M0866: EIP and Productivity Management

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Elements of Integrated Production Systems (L0927) Project-/problem-based Learning 2 3
Productivity Management (L0928) Project-/problem-based Learning 2 2
Productivity Management (L0931) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Hermann Lödding
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Basic lecture in Production Organization or Production Management
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge not available
Skills not available
Personal Competence
Social Competence not available
Autonomy Students are able to define research-related tasks, to acquire the requisite knowledge and to apply it to a problem.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes None Excercises
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 180 Minuten
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Specialisation I. Electives Management: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Production and Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Course L0927: Elements of Integrated Production Systems
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Hermann Lödding
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content not available
Literature

Harris, R.; Harris, C.; Wilson, E.: Making Materials Flow, Lean Enterprise Institute, Cambridge, 2003.

Ohno, T.: Das Toyota-Produktionssystem, Campus-Verlag, Frankfurt et al, 1993.

Rother, M.: Die Kata des Weltmarktführers. Toyotas Erfolgsmethoden, Campus-Verlag, Frankfurt et al, 2009.

Rother, M.; Shook, J.: Sehen lernen: Mit Wertstromdesign die Wertschöpfung erhöhen und Verschwendung beseitigen, Lean Management Institut, Aachen, 2006.

Rother, M.; Harris, R.: Creating Continuous Flow, Lean Enterprise Institute, Brookline, 2001.

Shingo, S.: A Revolution in Manufacturing. The SMED System, Productivity Press, 2006.

Womack, J. P. et al: Die zweite Revolution in der Autoindustrie, Frankfurt/New York, Campus Verlag, 1992.

Course L0928: Productivity Management
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Hermann Lödding
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Principles of productivity management
  • Shop floor management and standardisation
  • Takt analysis and design of manual operations
  • Maintenance Principles
  • Total Productive Maintenance (TPM)
  • Optimisation of set-up operations
  • Analysis of interlinked production systems
Literature

Bokranz, R.; Landau, K.:Produktivitätsmanagement von Arbeitssystemen. Schäffer-Poeschel, Stuttgart, 2006.

Takeda, H.: Das synchrone Produktionssystem: Just-in-Time für das ganze Unternehmen. 5. Aufl., mi-Wirtschaftsbuch, FinanzBuch Verlag, München, 2006.

Nakajima, S.: Management der Produktionseinrichtungen (Total Productive Maintenance). Campus Verlag, New York, 1995.

Shingo, S.: A Revolution in Manufacturing: The SMED System. Productivity, Inc., 1985

Course L0931: Productivity Management
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Hermann Lödding
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0697: Management Control

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Management Control (L0496) Lecture 3 3
Management Control (L0495) Seminar 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Matthias Meyer
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Basic knowledge of financial and cost accounting
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

On successful completion of this module, the students will know about:

  • Important concepts of German-language controlling research;
  • International differences and traditions in corporate management
  • Central controlling tasks such as the provision of information, planning and control as well as coordination
  • Differences between data, information and knowledge and they can explain them;
  • Digitization and impact on controlling
  • Instruments of operational, tactical and strategic planning;
  • Selected concepts of game theory, information economics and principal-agent theory;
  • Performance measures and coordination;
  • The concept of value-based management and key value-oriented key performance indicators;
  • Functions and methods for determining transfer prices;
  • Risk and project controlling instruments and concepts;
  • Monte Carlo simulation method, also as a research method;
Skills

On successful completion of this module, the students will be able to:

  • Explain the origin and nature of controlling in practice and to locate it internationally;
  • Explain important concepts of German-language controlling research;
  • Assess essential areas of responsibility of and requirements for controllers;
  • Explain various key figures and systems and classify their advantages and disadvantages;
  • Explain and apply the levers of reporting design;
  • Derive design recommendations for the supply of information;
  • Apply and evaluate essential (planning) instruments of controlling;
  • Comprehend tactical and strategic issues within companies;
  • Carry out game theoretical modelling and evaluation of decision-making problems;
  • Carry out a Monte Carlo simulation and interpret its results
  • Design and assess transfer prices according to different procedures;
  • Help shape the process of risk management and to be able to calculate and interpret aggregated risk measures;
  • Assign psychological theories to individual controlling problems and to derive design recommendations from them.
Personal Competence
Social Competence

On successful completion of this module, the students can:

  • Take over controlling tasks and to successfully transfer the theoretical knowledge into operational practice and apply it there;
  • Decide independently which controlling instruments can and must be used for which problem;
  • Work together with other team members, to discuss and come to a result together;
  • Apply concepts from psychology, game theory, information economics and principal-agent theory to new questions;
  • Present the results of their analyses in an understandable manner, also in English;
  • Solve business management problems within Controlling and its sub-areas independently and in a team;
  • Take on complex planning tasks in international companies, also in a managerial capacity.
Autonomy

The students are able…

  • To acquire knowledge by themselves and to transfer the knowledge acquired to new problems.
  • To argue the case for their findings (including in English).
  • develop their own critical understanding of research results


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
No 8.3 % Excercises
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Specialisation I. Electives Management: Elective Compulsory
Course L0496: Management Control
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Matthias Meyer
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

Information provision: Ratios and ratio systems, balanced scorecard, reporting, information supply design

•       Operative planning: Budgeting, operative production planning

•       Operative controlling: Deviation analysis and forecasting

•       Tactical planning: Quantitative and qualitative business planning

•       Strategic planning: Portfolio analysis, SWOT analysis, resource-based view, experience curve concept

•       Coordination: Economies of scope, value-oriented business ratios, transfer pricing, incentive systems, principal-agent theory

•       Risk controlling: Value at risk, risk analysis, risk aggregation, risk management, risk control

•       Project controlling


Literature
  1. Skript und Unterlagen, die zur Vorlesung und Übung herausgegeben werden.
  2. Ausgewählte Bücher:
  3. Balakrishnan, R./Sivaramakrishnan, K./Sprinkle, G. (2009): Managerial Accounting, Hoboken.
  4. Ewert, R./Wagenhofer, A. (2008): Interne Unternehmensrechnung, 7. Aufl., Berlin.
  5. Merchant, K./Van der Stede, W. (2012): Management Control Systems: Performance Measurement, Evaluation, and Incentives, London.
  6. Weber, J./Schäffer, U. (2011): Einführung in das Controlling, 13. Aufl., Stuttgart.


Course L0495: Management Control
Typ Seminar
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Matthias Meyer
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
Literature
  1. Skript und Aufgaben, die zur Vertiefung herausgegeben werden.
  2. Weiterführende Literatur, die jeweils mit Blick auf die gesetzten Themenschwerpunkte spezifiziert wird


Module M0543: Advanced Topics in Management, Organization, and Human Resource Management

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Advanced Topics in Management, Organization, and Human Resource Management (L0110) Lecture 2 3
Advanced Topics in Management, Organization, and Human Resource Management (L0111) Seminar 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Christian Ringle
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Foundations in Organizational Design and Human Resource Management

Basic knowledge on academic writing as well as principles and concepts in business administration and foundations in organizational design and human resource management.

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students are able to...

  • Explain the different organizational designs and strategies in an international environment with a focus on selected forms of cooperation (e.g., virtual organizations or strategic alliances) to compete in global business;
  • Map the need of organizational changes in light of new business lines, strategies, altering employees’ attitudes, and international competition;
  • Explain the models and approaches for appropriately measuring employee relations (e.g., job satisfaction models), incl. the development and estimation of causal models.
Skills

The students are able to...

  • Work with empirical data, apply business process management and multivariate techniques to the data collected using standard software, and critically evaluate and interpret the results;
  • Critically rethink theoretical concepts and gain analytical abilities in organization management and human resource management;
  • Use their practical knowledge of the analytical toolset to successfully tackle the management challenges in organization and human resource management in internationally acting companies;
  • Present their results in written and oral form.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to...

  • Respectfully work in teams;
  • Have fruitful group discussions;
  • Present their results in written form and oral presentations.


Autonomy

The students are able to...

  • Acquire further relevant information independently;
  • Critically reflect and evaluate this information;
  • Transfer the acquired knowledge to practical applications.



Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes 20 % Presentation
Examination Written elaboration
Examination duration and scale 6 pages per student in a team
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Specialisation I. Electives Management: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Management: Elective Compulsory
Course L0110: Advanced Topics in Management, Organization, and Human Resource Management
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Christian Ringle
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

This lecture focuses on multinational firms and advanced issues of management, organizations, and human resource management. This course is structured as a lecture and a seminar. In the lecture, the advanced theoretical concepts are explained and discussed, whereas they are applied in the seminar through the preparation of a seminar thesis. The students learn about the process and structure of a scientific article, and further deepen their knowledge, while working in groups.

Example topics:

  • Management: change management and corporate social responsibility;
  • Organization: exploration & exploitation, networks, and organizational identity;
  • Human Resource Management: human resource metrics & analytics and recruitment & selection.
Literature

The students will be provided with selected journal articles.

Bernardin, H.J. (2006): Human Resource Management: An Experiential Approach, 4e, New York: McGraw-Hill.

Cascio, W. (2015): Managing Human Resources: Productivity, Quality of Work Life, Profits, revised edition, New York: McGraw-Hill.

French, W./Bell, C.H./Zawacki, R.A. (2004): Organization Development and Transformation: Managing Effective Change, 6e, Chicago: McGraw-Hill.

Hitt, M.A./Ireland, R.D./Hoskisson, R.E. (2014): Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, 11e, Ohio: Cengage Learning.

Lynch, R. (2015): Strategic Management, 7e, Harlow: Prentice Hall.


Course L0111: Advanced Topics in Management, Organization, and Human Resource Management
Typ Seminar
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Christian Ringle
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

This course focuses on multinational firms and advanced issues of management, organizations, and human resource management. The students learn about the process and structure of a scientific article and deepen their knowledge while working in groupds. Selected topics focus, for example, on:

  • Human Resource Management: aging workforce, e-human resource management, generation X, Y, Z, human resource metrics/ analytics, recruitment/ selection/ hiring
  • Organisation: employee voice, exploration/ exploitation, networks, organisational identity, trust measurement
  • Management: change management, corporate social responsibility, firm performance measurement, gender, innovation management
Literature

The students will be provided with selected journal articles.

Bernardin, H.J. (2006): Human Resource Management: An Experiential Approach, 4e, New York: McGraw-Hill.

Cascio, W. (2015): Managing Human Resources: Productivity, Quality of Work Life, Profits, revised edition, New York: McGraw-Hill.

French, W./Bell, C.H./Zawacki, R.A. (2004): Organization Development and Transformation: Managing Effective Change, 6e, Chicago: McGraw-Hill.

Hitt, M.A./Ireland, R.D./Hoskisson, R.E. (2014): Strategic Management: Competitiveness and Globalization, 11e, Ohio: Cengage Learning.

Lynch, R. (2015): Strategic Management, 7e, Harlow: Prentice Hall.

Module M0559: Strategic Management

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Strategic Management (L0158) Lecture 4 6
Module Responsible Prof. Thomas Wrona
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Basic principles in International and Intercultural Management
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students will accumulate extensive knowledge about different aspects of strategic management after having participated in this module. Apart from strategic planning, students will be able to discern different contingency factors in strategic decision making and apply various strategies accordingly.

Students will gain competences in the following areas:

  • The historical and theoretical development of strategic management
  • Different forms of strategy formation
  • Content and process view of strategic management
  • Formulation and implementation of strategic options
  • Management systems and their influence on strategies
  • The origins of competitive advantage
Skills
  • Students are able to analyze and interpret external and internal information in the context of strategic choice
  • Students are able to differentiate environmental contingencies and assess risk potentials
  • Students are able to evaluate the attractiveness of different industries
  • Students are able to evaluate the pros and cons of strategic options and adequately select strategies during implementation
  • In essence, students are able to conceptually and theoretically “design” strategic decision processes and considers industry and corporate peculiarities during strategic planning

Those skills refer to competences in information seeking and analysis, the consolidation of data and their presentation in teams. These skills will be continuously shaped…

  • During case studies and strategic role plays, where students identify, develop and implement solutions for strategic problems
  • During complex data analyses, which are performed in groups and discussed in class
  • By making educated guesses about (yet unknown) corporate phenomena and decision makers attitudes, which are based on prior theoretical knowledge
Personal Competence
Social Competence

After attending the module students will be able…

  • To interact  and share own thoughts with group members during case study sessions or strategic role plays
  • To lead and take part in strategy-related discussions
  • To present results, both in written and verbal form
Autonomy

After attending the module students will be able…

  • To accumulate knowledge about specified strategic problems and transfer it to other related areas of interest
  • To identify related literature and integrate relevant findings during problem solution
  • To present existing and new knowledge about strategic phenomena in own conceptual ways
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
No 20 % Subject theoretical and practical work
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Specialisation I. Electives Management: Elective Compulsory
Course L0158: Strategic Management
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 4
CP 6
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Lecturer Prof. Thomas Wrona
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Introduction - Basic concepts and objects within the area of strategic management 
  • Objectives, corporate strategies, mission statements and management systems as an object of strategic management 
  • Theoretical perspectives of strategic management 
  • Analysis and design of selected strategies 
  • Strategic (planning) processes 
  • Integrative application of knowledge based on a number of selected case studies 

Theoretical, conceptual parts are devoted to the processing and discussion of theoretical contributions from  current management research, which are practically applied in case studies and simulations.

Literature

Bamberger, I./Wrona, T. (2012): Strategische Unternehmensführung. Strategien - Systeme - Prozesse,  
2. überarbeitete und erweiterte Auflage, München 2012

Bamberger, I./Wrona, T. (2012): Strategische Unternehmensberatung, 6. erweiterte Auflage, Wiesbaden 2012

Bamberger, I./Wrona, T. (1996): Der Ressourcenansatz und seine Bedeutung für die Strategische Unternehmensführung, in: Schmalenbachs Zeitschrift für betriebswirtschaftliche Forschung (zfbf), 2/1996, S. 130-153

Bowman, E.H./Singh, H./Thomas, H. (2006): The domain of strategic management: History and evolution, in: Pettigrew, A./Thomas, H./Whittington, R. (Hrsg.): Handbook of strategy and management, London u.a. 2006, S. 31-54

Johnson, G./Whittington, R./Scholes, K./Angwin, D./Regnér, D. (2017): Exploring strategy. Text and Cases, 11. Aufl., Harlow 2017

Kreikebaum, H./Gilbert, D. U./Behnam, M. (2018): Strategisches Management, Stuttgart.

Mintzberg, H./Ahlstrand, B./Lampel, J. (2002): Strategy Safari, New York 2002 (in deutscherSprache: Dies. (2012): Strategy Safari: Der Wegweiser durch den Dschungel des strategischen Managements, 2. Aufl., München 2012)

Porter, M. E. (2013): Wettbewerbsstrategie. Methoden zur Analyse von Branchen und Konkurrenten, 12. Aufl., Frankfurt 2013

zu Knyphausen-Aufseß, D. (2012): Theoretische Perspektiven des strategischen Managements, in: Welge, M.K./Al-Laham, A./Kajüter, P. (Hrsg.): Praxis des strategischen Managements, Wiesbaden 2012, S. 39-70


Skripte und Textdokumente, die während der Vorlesung herausgegeben werden:

Module M0815: Product Planning

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Product Planning (L0851) Lecture 3 3
Product Planning Seminar (L0853) Project-/problem-based Learning 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Cornelius Herstatt
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Good basic-knowledge of Business Administration

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students will gain  insights into:

  • Product Planning
    • Process
    • Methods
  • Design thinking
    • Process
    • Methods
    • User integration
Skills

Students will gain deep insights into:

  • Product Planning
    • Process-related aspects
    • Organisational-related aspects
    • Human-Ressource related aspects
    • Working-tools, methods and instruments

Personal Competence
Social Competence
  • Interact within a team
  • Raise awareness for globabl issues
Autonomy
  • Gain access to knowledge sources
  • Interpret complex cases
  • Develop presentation skills
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes 20 % Subject theoretical and practical work
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula Global Innovation Management: Core qualification: Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation I. Electives Management: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Management: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L0851: Product Planning
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Cornelius Herstatt
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

Product Planning Process

This integrated lecture is designed to understand major issues, activities and tools in the context of systematic product planning, a key activity for managing the front-end of innovation, i.e.:
•    Systematic scanning of markets for innovation opportunities
•    Understanding strengths/weakness and specific core competences of a firm as platforms for innovation
•    Exploring relevant sources for innovation (customers, suppliers, Lead Users, etc.)
•    Developing ideas for radical innovation, relying on the creativeness of employees, using techniques to stimulate creativity and creating a stimulating environment
•    Transferring ideas for innovation into feasible concepts which have a high market attractively

Voluntary presentations in the third hour (articles / case studies)

- Guest lectures by researchers 

- Lecture on Sustainability with frequent reference to current research

- Permanent reference to current research

Examination:

In addition to the written exam at the end of the module, students have to attend the PBL-exercises and prepare presentations in groups in order to pass the module. Additionally, students have the opportunity to present research papers on a voluntary base.  With these presentations it is possible to gain a bonus of max. 20% for the exam. However, the bonus is only valid if the exam is passed without the bonus.

Literature Ulrich, K./Eppinger, S.: Product Design and Development, 2nd. Edition, McGraw-Hill 2010
Course L0853: Product Planning Seminar
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Cornelius Herstatt
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content Seminar is integrative part of the Module Product Planning (for content see lecture) and can not be choosen independantly.
Literature See lecture information "Product Planning".

Module M0994: Information Technology in Logistics

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Informationtechnology in Logsitics (L1197) Practical Course 6 6
Module Responsible Prof. Thorsten Blecker
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Knowledge from the module "Production and Logistics Management";
Interest in new technologies and their application in logistics

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

• on the relationship between logistics and IT, and representation and describtion in depth;
• information systems and information management, and the application of information systems and information management to logistical issues;
• using information technologies that are currently used in logistics, such as RFID, e-logistics and electronic sourcing.

Skills

• to assess the use of information technology in logistics issues and to implement appropriate technologies;
• to be able to deal critically with the current developments in IT and logistics and to assess them critically;
• analyse in depth relevant issues arising from the thematic field of "IT in Logistics" at a scientific level;
• to independently work on current topics from the field of "IT in Logistics";
• analyse the relationship between logistics and IT;
• implementing information technology in logistics successfully
• to transfer the theoretical knowledge of information technologies to real situations and to give recommendations of action for solving new tasks;
• to solve logistical problems using information technology 

Personal Competence
Social Competence

• to conduct subject-specific and interdisciplinary discussions;
• oral and written presentation of results
• respectful team work

Autonomy

• work independently on a subject and transfer the acquired knowledge to new problems.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written elaboration
Examination duration and scale -
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Specialisation I. Electives Management: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Production and Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Course L1197: Informationtechnology in Logsitics
Typ Practical Course
Hrs/wk 6
CP 6
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Lecturer Prof. Thorsten Blecker
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • In the beginning the students get insight of the functionality of a service-oriented architecture.
  • Then the students will get a logistic problem to solve in small groups.
  • The elaborations result shall be one or more programmed services/module that together with the other groups result completes a total application.


Literature

Skripte und Textdokumente, die während der Vorlesung herausgegeben werden

Module M1003: Management Control Systems for Operations

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Management Control Systems for Operations (L1219) Project-/problem-based Learning 4 5
Management Control Systems for Operations (L1224) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Wolfgang Kersten
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Introduction to Business and Management


Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students have acquired in depth knowledge in the following areas and can

  • explain the function and the requirements of management control systems,
  • explain the targets and the tasks of production and supply chain comtrolling,
  • understand management control systems for production in an international context,
  • explain the major aspects of investment planning and control,
  • explain the major aspects of cost management,
  • explain and understand the procedures of budgeting,
  • present and give a detailed explanation of methods and tools of management control systems for production and supply chains,
  • describe opportunities and risks of digitalization for the design of management control systems for production and supply chains,
  • give an overview of relevant research topics for management control systems for production and supply chains.


Skills

Based on the acquired knowledge students are capable of

-    Applying methods of managerial accounting in production and logistics in an international context,
-    Selecting sufficient methods of managerial accounting in production and logistics to solve practical problems,
-    Selecting appropriate methods of managerial accounting in production and logistics also for non-standardized problems,
-    Making a holistic assessment of areas of decision in management control systems for production and logistics and relevant influence factors.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

After completion of the module students can
-    lead discussions and team sessions,
-    arrive at work results in groups and document them,
-    develop joint solutions in mixed teams and present them to others,
-    present solutions to specialists and develop ideas further.


Autonomy

After completion of the module students can

- assess possible consequences of their professional activity,

- define tasks independently, acquire the requisite knowledge and use suitable means of implementation,

- define and carry out research tasks bearing in mind possible societal consequences.


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes 20 % Subject theoretical and practical work
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Bioprocess Engineering: Specialisation C - Bioeconomic Process Engineering, Focus Management and Controlling: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation I. Electives Management: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Production and Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Course L1219: Management Control Systems for Operations
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 4
CP 5
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 94, Study Time in Lecture 56
Lecturer Prof. Wolfgang Kersten
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Identification of missions and changing requirements on controlling
  • Differentiating managerial accounting, production management, logistics and supply chain controlling
  • Considering global dispersed supply chain networks in production management and supply chain controlling
  • Analyzing investment projects and resulting effects (investment control, risk management in investment)
  • In depth knowledge in planning, realizing and controlling investments
  • Developing characteristics of differentiation for cost and activity accounting (aim, purpose, opportunities in structuring etc.)
  • In depth knowledge in cost management (cost types and units)
  • Budgeting in practice; Analysis of existing methods
  • Development of an approach in activity based costing
  • Application of target costing
  • Knowing the importance and method of life cycle costing
  • Applying performance figures in production and logistics
  • Discussion of opportunities and risks of digitalization for the design of management control systems for production and supply chains
  • Developing recommendations for problem solving by using research oriented problem based learning sessions for relevant actual topics and cases; thereby preparing and presenting results in intercultural teams


Literature

Altrogge, G. (1996): Investition, 4. Aufl., Oldenbourg, München

Arvis, J.-F. et al. (2018): Connecting to Compete - Trade Logistics in the Global Economy, The World Bank Group, Washington, DC, USA; Download: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/29971

Betge, P. (2000): Investitionsplanung: Methoden, Modelle, Anwendungen, 4. Aufl., Vahlen, München.

Christopher, M. (2005): Logistics and Supply Chain Management, 3. Aufl., Pearson Education, Edinburgh.

Corsten, H., Gössinger, R., Spengler, Th. (Hrsg., 2018): Handbuch Produktions- und Logistikmanagement in Wertschöpfungsnetzwerken, Berlin/Boston

Eversheim, W., Schuh, G. (2000): Produktion und Management. Betriebshütte: 2 Bde., 7. Aufl., Springer Verlag, Berlin.

Günther, H.-O., Tempelmeier, H. (2005): Produktion und Logistik, 6. Aufl., Springer Verlag, Berlin.

Hahn, D. Horváth, P., Frese, E. (2000): Operatives und strategisches Controlling, in: Eversheim, W., Schuh, G. (Hrsg.): Produktion und Management. Betriebshütte: 2 Bde. Springer Verlag, Berlin.

Hansmann, K.-W. (1987): Industriebetriebslehre, 2. Aufl., Oldenbourg, München.

Hoitsch, H.-J. (1993): Produktionswirtschaft: Grundlagen einer industriellen Betriebswirtschaftslehre, 2. Aufl., Vahlen, München.

Horváth, P./ Gleich, R./ Seiter, M. (2019): Controlling, 14. Aufl., Vahlen, München.

Kersten, W. et al. (2017): Chancen der digitalen Transformation. Trends und Strategien in Logistik und Supply Chain Management, DVV Media Group, Hamburg.

Kruschwitz, L. (2009): Investitionsrechnung, 12. Aufl., Oldenbourg, München.

Obermaier, Robert (Hrsg., 2019): Handbuch Industrie 4.0 und Digitale Transformation: Betriebswirtschaftliche, technische und rechtliche Herausforderungen, Wiesbaden

Preißler, P. R. (2000): Controlling. 12. Aufl., Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag, München.

Weber, J./ Wallenburg, C. M. (2010): Logistik- und Supply Chain Controlling, 6. Auflage, Schaeffer Poeschel Verlag, Stuttgart.

Wildemann, H. (1987): Strategische Investitionsplanung, Methoden zur Bewertung neuer Produktionstechnologien, Gabler, Wiesbaden.

Wildemann, H. (2001): Produktionscontrolling: Systemorientiertes Controlling schlanker Produktionsstrukturen, 4. Aufl. TCW, München.


Course L1224: Management Control Systems for Operations
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Wolfgang Kersten
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Identification of missions and changing requirements on controlling
  • Differentiating managerial accounting, production management, logistics and supply chain controlling
  • Considering global dispersed supply chain networks in production management and supply chain controlling
  • Analyzing investment projects and resulting effects (investment control, risk management in investment)
  • In depth knowledge in planning, realizing and controlling investments
  • Developing characteristics of differentiation for cost and activity accounting (aim, purpose, opportunities in structuring etc.)
  • In depth knowledge in cost management (cost types and units)
  • Budgeting in practice; Analysis of existing methods
  • Development of an approach in activity based costing
  • Application of target costing
  • Knowing the importance and method of life cycle costing
  • Applying performance figures in production and logistics
  • Developing recommendations for problem solving  by using problem based learning sessions for case studies; thereby preparing and presenting results in intercultural teams


Literature

Altrogge, G. (1996): Investition, 4. Aufl., Oldenbourg, München

Betge, P. (2000): Investitionsplanung: Methoden, Modelle, Anwendungen, 4. Aufl., Vahlen, München.

Christopher, M. (2005): Logistics and Supply Chain Management, 3. Aufl., Pearson Education, Edinburgh.

Eversheim, W., Schuh, G. (2000): Produktion und Management. Betriebshütte: 2 Bde., 7. Aufl., Springer Verlag, Berlin.

Günther, H.-O., Tempelmeier, H. (2005): Produktion und Logistik, 6. Aufl., Springer Verlag, Berlin.

Hahn, D. Horváth, P., Frese, E. (2000): Operatives und strategisches Controlling, in: Eversheim, W., Schuh, G. (Hrsg.): Produktion und Management. Betriebshütte: 2 Bde. Springer Verlag, Berlin.

Hansmann, K.-W. (1987): Industriebetriebslehre, 2. Aufl., Oldenbourg, München.

Hoitsch, H.-J. (1993): Produktionswirtschaft: Grundlagen einer industriellen Betriebswirtschaftslehre, 2. Aufl., Vahlen, München.

Horváth, P. (2011): Controlling, 12. Aufl., Vahlen, München.

Kruschwitz, L. (2009): Investitionsrechnung, 12. Aufl., Oldenbourg, München.

Martinich, J. S. (1997): Production and operations management: an applied modern approach. Wiley.

Preißler, P. R. (2000): Controlling. 12. Aufl., Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag, München.

Weber, J. (2002): Logistik- und Supply Chain Controlling, 5. Auflage, Schaeffer-Poeschel Verlag, Stuttgart.

Wildemann, H. (1987): Strategische Investitionsplanung, Methoden zur Bewertung neuer Produktionstechnologien, Gabler, Wiesbaden.

Wildemann, H. (2001): Produktionscontrolling: Systemorientiertes Controlling schlanker Produktionsstrukturen, 4. Aufl. TCW, München.


Module M1035: Entrepreneurial Finance

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Entrepreneurial Finance: Case Studies (L1282) Seminar 3 4
Entrepreneurial Finance: Lecture (L1281) Lecture 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Christoph Ihl
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge in business economics and finance obtained in the compulsory modules and participation in the module “Technology Entrepreneurship” is highly recommended.


Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Wissen (subject-related knowledge and understanding):

  • understand the structure of a financial plan for a new venture
  • understand the procedures, pros and cons of different valuation methods
  • understand the design of financial contracts and term sheets
  • understand the interests of venture capital funds
  • understand the pros and cons of different growth and exit options
Skills

Fertigkeiten (subject-related skills):

  • prepare a financial plan for a new venture
  • value a new venture in financial terms
  • apply different valuation methods
  • evaluate the attractiveness of financial contracts
  • design VC term sheets
  • design employee contracts in terms of financial compensation
  • design financial contracts and conduct financial negotiations
  • assess and justify possible growth and exit options
Personal Competence
Social Competence

Sozialkompetenz (Social Competence):

  • team work
  • communication and presentation
  • give and take critical comments
  • engaging in fruitful discussions
Autonomy

Selbständigkeit (Autonomy):

  • autonomous work and time management
  • project management
  • analytical skills
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes 20 % Group discussion
Examination Subject theoretical and practical work
Examination duration and scale Presentations and case study work
Assignment for the Following Curricula Global Innovation Management: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Global Technology and Innovation Management & Entrepreneurship: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation I. Electives Management: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Management: Elective Compulsory
Course L1282: Entrepreneurial Finance: Case Studies
Typ Seminar
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Christoph Ihl
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

Entrepreneurial finance is at the center of a clash of two very distant worlds: that of entrepreneurship and that of finance. Finance is disciplined, based on numbers and logical thinking and looking for proven track records. Entrepreneurship is messy, based on intuition and experimentation and treading off the beaten track. Entrepreneurial finance is the provision of funding to young, innovative, growth-oriented companies. Entrepreneurial companies are young, typically less than ten years old, and introduce innovative products or business models. The younger are called “startups,” and are typically less than five years old.

There is a variety of investors who can finance entrepreneurial companies: family and friends, business angels, accelerators and incubators, crowdfunding platforms, venture capital firms, corporate investors, etc. The course provides a thorough understanding of what motivates them, of the way they invest, and of what support they can provide to a company at what stage in the fundraising cycle. The course addresses the following key questions: How much money can and should be raised? When should it be raised and from whom? What is a reasonable valuation of the company? How should funding, employment contracts and exit decisions be structured?

Thus, the course provides an understanding of the whole fundraising cycle, from the moment the entrepreneur conceived her idea to the moment investors exit the company and move on. We examine the entrepreneur's signalling to investors of the qualities of the venture, the investors' evaluation of the venture, the various dimensions of contracting (cash flow rights, control rights, compensation, and other clauses), the negotiation of a deal and the provision of corporate governance, the process of staged financing, the financing through debt, and the exit process though liquidity events such as initial public offering, sale or merger.

The following topics will be covered with specific case studies:

1. Introduction: Evaluating Venture Opportunities

2. Financial Planning

3. Ownership and Returns

4. Valuation Methods

5. Term Sheets

6. Structuring Deals

7. Corporate Governance

8. Staged Financing

9. Debt Financing

10. Exits

11. Early Stage & Venture Capital Investors

12. Ecosystems

Literature

Da Rin, Marco, and Thomas Hellmann. Fundamentals of Entrepreneurial Finance. Oxford University Press, 2020.


Course L1281: Entrepreneurial Finance: Lecture
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Christoph Ihl
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

Entrepreneurial finance is at the center of a clash of two very distant worlds: that of entrepreneurship and that of finance. Finance is disciplined, based on numbers and logical thinking and looking for proven track records. Entrepreneurship is messy, based on intuition and experimentation and treading off the beaten track. Entrepreneurial finance is the provision of funding to young, innovative, growth-oriented companies. Entrepreneurial companies are young, typically less than ten years old, and introduce innovative products or business models. The younger are called “startups,” and are typically less than five years old.

There is a variety of investors who can finance entrepreneurial companies: family and friends, business angels, accelerators and incubators, crowdfunding platforms, venture capital firms, corporate investors, etc. The course provides a thorough understanding of what motivates them, of the way they invest, and of what support they can provide to a company at what stage in the fundraising cycle. The course addresses the following key questions: How much money can and should be raised? When should it be raised and from whom? What is a reasonable valuation of the company? How should funding, employment contracts and exit decisions be structured?

Thus, the course provides an understanding of the whole fundraising cycle, from the moment the entrepreneur conceived her idea to the moment investors exit the company and move on. We examine the entrepreneur's signalling to investors of the qualities of the venture, the investors' evaluation of the venture, the various dimensions of contracting (cash flow rights, control rights, compensation, and other clauses), the negotiation of a deal and the provision of corporate governance, the process of staged financing, the financing through debt, and the exit process though liquidity events such as initial public offering, sale or merger.

The following topics will be covered in lectures:

1. Introduction: Evaluating Venture Opportunities

2. Financial Planning

3. Ownership and Returns

4. Valuation Methods

5. Term Sheets

6. Structuring Deals

7. Corporate Governance

8. Staged Financing

9. Debt Financing

10. Exits

11. Early Stage & Venture Capital Investors

12. Ecosystems



Literature

Da Rin, Marco, and Thomas Hellmann. Fundamentals of Entrepreneurial Finance. Oxford University Press, 2020.

Module M1683: Project and Negotiation Management

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Open Project Exercise (L2798) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Project Management (L0709) Lecture 2 2
Negotiation Management (L2669) Project-/problem-based Learning 3 3
Module Responsible Prof. Christian Lüthje
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge


Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students will be familiar with...

Project management

  • characteristics and critical success factors of projects,
  • typical phases in projects, corresponding tasks and challenges,
  • advanced methods and tools, which can be applied in special phases of a project (such as cost-benefit analyses, scheduling techniques, business process modeling techniques, change management approaches),
  • important soft factors influencing a project’s success (such as cultural aspects, team dynamics, and leadership approaches),
  • different project management approaches (classic vs. agile vs. hybrid),
  • practical cases of international project management,
  • theories, strategies, and advanced methods of negotiation (such as game theory, decision theory, and negotiation analysis).

Negotiation management

  • the theory basics of negotiations (e.g. game theory, behavioral theories)
  • the types and the pros and cons of different negotiation strategies
  • the process of negotiation including goal formulation, preparation/planning, execution and evaluation 
  • about some key issues impacting negotiations (e.g. team building and roles, barriers to reaching a deal, cognitive biases, multi-phase negotiations)
Skills

Students will be able to...

Project Management

  • conduct stakeholder and industry analyses,
  • critically analyze industries and multinational firms (e.g., in terms of their competitive situation and their strengths and weaknesses),
  • systematically implement project management techniques to international projects (e.g., plan international projects, deal with uncertainty, and establish, harmonize and track quality, time, and cost objectives),
  • apply project management techniques to complex business cases (e.g., optimize the target setting process, develop work breakdown structures, schedules and action plans, monitor project progress, manage risk throughout the project, and do the project controlling),
  • apply strategies and methods of negotiation to complex business cases,
  • internalize the components of an effective negotiation and practice their use,
  • successfully apply strategies and methods of negotiation in business practice in an international context (e.g., expose and overcome typical barriers to an agreement, deal with typical hardball tactics, and avoid cognitive traps),
  • work target-oriented on exercises to solve case studies,
  • apply scientific standards to academic writing,
  • appropriately present results of their work to others.

Negotiation Management

  • simultaneously considering multiple factors in negotiation situations and taking reasoned actions when preparing and conducting negotiations.
  • Analyzing and handling the key challenges of uncertainty, risk, intercultural differences, and time pressure in realistic negotiation situations.
  • assessing the typical barriers to an agreement (e.g. lack of trust), dealing with hardball tactics (e.g. good cop, bad cop; lowball, highball; intimidation), and avoiding cognitive traps (e.g. unchecked emotions, overconfidence).
  • reflecting on their decision-making in uncertain negotiation situations and derive actions for future decisions.
Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students will be able to...

  • lead fruitful group discussions,
  • provide appropriate feedback,
  • present their results in written form and by oral presentations,
  • collaborate respectfully in multicultural teams,
  • be reflective on their own behavior in negotiations.
Autonomy

The students will be able to...

  • independently acquire further relevant information and critically evaluate this information,
  • independently gather knowledge,
  • improve management techniques and adapt these to new situations in international business practice.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Subject theoretical and practical work
Examination duration and scale Negotiation Strategies: Preparation and reviewing problem-based learning sessions; Projektmanagement: tbd
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Specialisation I. Electives Management: Elective Compulsory
Course L2798: Open Project Exercise
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Carlos Jahn
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

In the lecture Project Management, the most important phases of a project and the use of the project management software Open Project are taught. In the group exercise, example projects are worked on in small groups and these project phases are run through. The project is planned and documented with Open Project.

Literature
Course L0709: Project Management
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Carlos Jahn
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

The lecture “project management” aims at characterizing typical phases of projects. Important contents are: possible tasks, organization, techniques and tools for initiation, definition, planning, management and finalization of projects. This will also be deepened by exercises within the framework of the event.

The following topics will be covered in the lecture:

  • SMART, Work Breakdown Structure, Operationalization, Goals relation matrix
  • Metra-Potential Method (MPM), Critical-Path Method (CPM), Program evaluation and review technique (PERT)
  • Milestone Analysis, Earned Value Analyis (EVA)
  • Progress reporting, Tracing of project goals, deadlines and costs, Project Management Control Loop, Maturity Level Assurance (MLA)
  • Risk Management, Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA), Risk Matrix

Literature

Project Management Institute (2017): A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) 6. Aufl. Newtown Square, PA, USA: Project Management Institute.

DeMarco, Tom (1997). The Deadline: A Novel About Project Management.

DIN Deutsches Institut für Normung e.V. (2009). Projektmanagement - Projektmanagementsysteme - Teil 5: Begriffe. (DIN 69901-5)

Frigenti, Enzo and Comninos, Dennis (2002). The Practice of Project Management.

Haberfellner, Reinhard (2015). Systems Engineering: Grundlagen und Anwendung

Harrison, Frederick and Lock, Dennis (2004). Advanced Project Management: A Structured Approach.

Heyworth, Frank (2002). A Guide to Project Management.

ISO - International Organization for Standardization (2012). Guidance on Project Management. (21500:2012(E))

Kerzner, Harold (2013). Project Management: A Systems Approach to Planning, Scheduling, and Controlling.

Lock, Dennis (2018). Project Management.

Martinelli, Russ J. and Miloševic, Dragan (2016). Project Management Toolbox: Tools and Techniques for the Practicing Project Manager.

Murch, Richard (2011). Project Management: Best Practices for IT Professionals.

Patzak, Gerold and Rattay, Günter (2009). Projektmanagement: Leitfaden zum Management von Projekten, Projektportfolios, Programmen und projektorientierten Unternehmen.

Course L2669: Negotiation Management
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Christian Lüthje
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

General description of course content and course goals

We negotiaate everday in privat and professional contexts. Leading negotiations successfully has a significant impact on future careers. Yet, we tend to have limited knowledge about the theory and empirical evidence regarding successful negotiating. Many people approach negotiations in a rather intuitive and unplanned way which often results in sub-optimal negotiation outcomes.

The purpose of this interactive and problem-based course is to theortically understand the strategies and process of negotiation as practiced in a variety of business-related settings (e.g. negotiations about working conditions, negotiations with customers and suppliers). The course will highlight the components of an effective negotiation (strategy, perparation, execution, evaluation) and offer the students the opportunity to analyze their own behavior in negotiations in order to improve.

The course structure is experiential and problem-based, combining lectures, class discussion, mini-cases and small erxercises, and more comprehensive negotiation practices in longer sessions. Through participation in negotiation exercises, students will have the opportunity to practice their communication and persuasion skills and to experiment with a variety of negotiating strategies and tactics. Students will apply the lessons learned to ongoing, real-world negotiations.


Content:

The students will find answers to the following fundamental questions of negotiation strategies in theory and practice:

  • How do negotiations influence everyday life and business processes?
  • What are key features of negotiations?
  • What are different forms of negotiations? What kinds of negotiation can be distinguished?
  • Which theoretical approaches to a theory of negotiation can be distinguished?
  • How can game theory be applied to negotiation?
  • What makes an effective negotiator?
  • Which factors should be considered when planning negotiations?
  • What steps must be followed to reach a deal?
  • Are there specific negotiation tactics?
  • What are the typical barriers to an agreement and how to deal with them?
  • What are possible cognitive (mental) errors and how to correct them?

Knowledge

Students know...

  • the theory basics of negotiations (e.g. game theory, behavioral theories)
  • the types and the pros and cons of diffrent negotiation strategies
  • the process of negotiation, inlcuding goal formulation, preparation/planning, execution and evaluation 
  • about some key issues impacting negotiations (e.g. team building and roles, barriers to reaching a deal, cognitive biases, multi-phase negotiations)

Skills

Students are capable of...

  • simultaneously considering multiple factors in negotiation situations and taking reasoned actions when preparing and conducting negotiations.
  • Analyzing and handling the key challenges of uncertainty, risk, intercultural differences, and time pressure in realistic negotiation situations.
  • assessing the typical barriers to an agreement (e.g. lack of trust), dealing with hardball tactics (e.g. good cop, bad cop; lowball, highball; intimidation), and avoiding cognitive traps (e.g. unchecked emotions, overconfidence).
  • reflecting on their decision-making in uncertain negotiation situations and derive actions for future decisions.

Social Competence

Students can...

  • provide appropriate feedback and handle feedback on their own performance constructively.
  • constructively interact with their team members in role playing in negotiations sessions
  • develop joint solutions in mixed teams and present them to others in real-world negotiation situatio

    Self-Reliance

    Students are able to...

    • assess possible consequences of their own negotiation behavior
    • define own positions and tasks in the negotiation preparation process.
    • justify and make elaborated decisions in authentic negotiation situations.




Literature

R.J. Lewicki / B. Barry / D.M. Saunders: Negotiation. Sixth Edition, McGraw-Hill, Boston, 2010.

H. Raiffa: Negotiation analysis. Belknap Press of Harvard Univ. Press, Cambridge, Mass, 2007.

R. Fisher / W. Ury: Getting to yes. Third edition. Penguin, New York, 2011.

M. Voeth / U. Herbst: Verhandlungsmanagement: Planung, Steuerung und Analyse. Schäffer-Poeschel, Stuttgart, 2009.

Module M1701: Digital Economics

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Digital Economics (L2715) Lecture 2 3
Digital Economics (L2716) Project-/problem-based Learning 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Timo Heinrich
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Knowledge of economics as taught in the Economics module is expected.

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students know

  • basic concepts of game theory, auction theory and mechanism design,
  • the properties of online advertising markets and matching markets,
  • basic concepts of social choice,
  • models of belief formation,
  • how trust is established in online interactions,
  • current models of behavioral economics as well as
  • empirical results concerning these topics.
Skills

On the basis of the knowledge acquired, students will be able to

  • analyze and model behavior in digital networks and markets,
  • understand and discuss current empirical research on the topic and
  • develop their own empirical research questions.
Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students will be able to

  • participate in subject-specific and interdisciplinary discussions on the topics of the course,
  • present and discuss their work results from empirical studies and
  • cooperate successfully and respectfully in a team.
Autonomy

Students will be able to

  • identify empirical research questions from the areas of the courses and analyze and answer them independently and in a team,
  • acquire knowledge about the subject area independently and transfer the acquired knowledge to new questions as well as
  • critically evaluate the results of their work.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Subject theoretical and practical work
Examination duration and scale 10- to 15-page elaboration
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Specialisation I. Electives Management: Elective Compulsory
Course L2715: Digital Economics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Timo Heinrich
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Game theory
  • Auction theory
  • Mechanism design
  • Online advertising markets
  • Matching markets
  • Social choice
  • Beliefs formation
  • Reputation systems
  • Behavioral economics
Literature
  • Parkes/Seuken: Algorithmic Economics: A Design Approach, Unpublished, 2020
  • Easley/Kleinberg: Networks, Crowds and Markets, Cambridge University Press, 2010
  • Weimann/Brosig-Koch: Methods in Experimental Economics, Springer, 2019
  • Pass: A Course in Networks and Markets: Game-theoretic Models and Reasoning, MIT Press, 2019
Course L2716: Digital Economics
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Timo Heinrich
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

Students examine existing empirical studies on topics covered in the lecture and develop their own research questions and study designs.

Literature
  • Parkes/Seuken: Algorithmic Economics: A Design Approach, Unpublished, 2020
  • Easley/Kleinberg: Networks, Crowds and Markets, Cambridge University Press, 2010
  • Weimann/Brosig-Koch: Methods in Experimental Economics, Springer, 2019
  • Pass: A Course in Networks and Markets: Game-theoretic Models and Reasoning, MIT Press, 2019

Module M0814: Technology Management

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Technology Management (L0849) Lecture 3 3
Technology Management Seminar (L0850) Project-/problem-based Learning 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Cornelius Herstatt
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Bachelor knowledge in business management

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students will gain deep insights into:

  • International R&D-Management
  • Technology Timing Strategies
    • Technology Strategies and Lifecycle Management (I/II)
    • Technology Intelligence and Planning
  • Technology Portfolio Management
    • Technology Portfolio Methodology
    • Technology Acquisition and Exploitation
    • IP Management
  • Organizing Technology Development
    • Technology Organization & Management
    • Technology Funding & Controlling
Skills

The course aims to:

  • Develop an understanding of the importance of Technology Management - on a national as well as international level
  • Equip students with an understanding of important elements of Technology Management  (strategic, operational, organizational and process-related aspects)
  • Foster a strategic orientation to problem-solving within the innovation process as well as Technology Management and its importance for corporate strategy
  • Clarify activities of Technology Management (e.g. technology sourcing, maintenance and exploitation)
  • Strengthen essential communication skills and a basic understanding of managerial, organizational and financial issues concerning Technology-, Innovation- and R&D-management. Further topics to be discussed include:
  • Basic concepts, models and tools, relevant to the management of technology, R&D and innovation
  • Innovation as a process (steps, activities and results)
Personal Competence
Social Competence
  • Interact within a team
  • Raise awareness for globabl issues
Autonomy
  • Gain access to knowledge sources
  • Discuss recent research debates in the context of Technology and Innovation Management
  • Develop presentation skills
  • Discussion of international cases in R&D-Management
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula Global Innovation Management: Core qualification: Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation I. Electives Management: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Management: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Compulsory
Course L0849: Technology Management
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Cornelius Herstatt
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

The role of technology for the competitive advantage of the firm and industries; Basic concepts, models and tools for the management of technology; managerial decision making regarding the identification, selection and protection of technology (make or buy, keep or sell, current and future technologies). Theories, practical examples (cases), lectures, interactive sessions and group study.

This lecture is part of the Module Technology Management and can not separately choosen.

Literature Leiblein, M./Ziedonis, A.: Technology Strategy and Inoovation Management, Elgar Research Collection, Northhampton (MA) 2011
Course L0850: Technology Management Seminar
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Cornelius Herstatt
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

Beside the written exam at the end of the module, students have to give one presentation (RE) on a research paper and two presentations as part of a group discussion (GD) in the seminar in order to pass. With these presentations it is possible to gain a bonus of max. 20% for the exam. However, the bonus is only valid if the exam is passed without the bonus.


Literature see lecture Technology Management.

Specialization II. Civil Engineering

Module M0998: Statics and Dynamics of Structures

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Structural Dynamics (L1202) Lecture 2 2
Structural Dynamics (L1203) Recitation Section (large) 2 2
Fracture mechanics and fatigue in steel structures (L0564) Lecture 1 1
Fracture mechanics and fatigue in steel structures (L0565) Recitation Section (large) 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Uwe Starossek
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Knowledge of linear structural analysis of statically determinate and indeterminate structures; Mechanics I/II, Mathematics I/II, Differential equations I

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

After successful completion of this module, the student can explain the basic aspects of dynamic effects on structures and the respective methods.




Skills

After successful completion of this module, the students will be able to predict the response of material and structures to dynamics loading using the appropriate computational approaches and methods.



Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students can

  • participate in subject-specific and interdisciplinary discussions,
  • defend their own work results in front of others
  • promote the scientific development of colleagues
  • Furthermore, they can give and accept professional constructive criticism
Autonomy

Students are able to gain knowledge of the subject area from given and other sources and apply it to new problems. Furthermore, they are able to structure the solution process for problems in the area of Structural Analysis.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 150 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Structural Engineering: Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Geotechnical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Water and Traffic: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Civil Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L1202: Structural Dynamics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Uwe Starossek
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Single-degree-of-freedom systems: undamped and damped vibration, free vibration, forced vibrations due to harmonic, periodical or arbitrary loading, natural frequency, damping
  • vibration isolation
  • solution in the frequency-domain (Fourier transformation), solution in the time-domain
  • multi-degree-of-freedom systems: continuous or discrete systems, modelling with finite elements, generalisation
  • modal analysis
  • power iteration according to v.Mises
  • earthquake loading: seismological basics, response spectrum method
  • wind-induced vibrations: engineering meteorology, aerodynamic, classification of excitation mechanisms
progressive collapse


Literature

Clough, R.W., Penzien, J.: Dynamics of Structures. 2. Aufl., McGraw-Hill, New York, 1993.


Course L1203: Structural Dynamics
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Uwe Starossek
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L0564: Fracture mechanics and fatigue in steel structures
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Dr. Jürgen Priebe
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

    basics of fatigue stress and fatigue resistance and determination of fatigue strength,

    determination anduse of S-N-curves and classification of notch effects,

    set up of determination of fatigue strength under dynamic load using the accumulation formula by Palmgren-Miner,

    set up of determination of fatigue strength in different examples,

    basics of construction and design regarding the problem of material fatigue,

    basics of linear elastic fracture mechanics under static and dynamic load,

    determination of lifetime of steel construction based on linear elastic fracture mechanics in different examples.

Literature

    Seeßelberg, C.; Kranbahnen - Bemessung und konstruktive Gestaltung; 3. Auflage;      Bauwerk-Verlag; Berlin 2009

    Kuhlmann, Dürr, Günther; Kranbahnen und Betriebsfestigkeit; in Stahlbau Kalender 2003; Verlag Ernst & Sohn; Berlin 2003

    Deutscher Stahlbau-Verband (Hrsg.); Stahlbau Handbuch Band 1 Teil B; 3. Auflage; Stahlbau-Verlagsgesellschaft; Köln 1996

    Petersen, C.; Stahlbau; 3. überarb. und erw. Auflage; Vieweg-Verlag; Braunschweig 1993

    DIN V ENV 1993-1-1: Eurocode 3; Bemessung und Konstruktion von Stahlbauwerken; Teil 1-1: Allgemeine Bemessungsregeln, Bemessungsregeln für den Hochbau; 1993

    DIN V ENV 1993-6: Eurocode 3; Bemessung und Konstruktion von Stahlbauwerken; Teil 6: Kranbahnen; 2001

    DIN-Fachbericht 126. Richtlinie zur Anwendung von DIN V ENV 1993-6; Nationales Anwendungsdokument (NAD); Berlin 2002











Course L0565: Fracture mechanics and fatigue in steel structures
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Dr. Jürgen Priebe
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0723: Design of Prestressed Structures and Concrete Bridges

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Design of Prestressed Structures and Concreet Bridges (L0603) Lecture 3 4
Design of Prestressed Structures and Concreet Bridges (L0604) Recitation Section (large) 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Günter Rombach
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Detailed knowledge on the design of concrete structures.

Modules: Reinforced Concrete Structures I+II, Structural Analysis I+II, Mechanics I+II, Concrete Structures

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students know the main bridge types, their applications and the various loads. They can explain the basic design methods. They can explain the design of a prestressed bridge.

Skills

The students are able to design reinforced or prestressed concrete bridges.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students can design in teamwork a real concrete bridge.

Autonomy

The students are able to design a prestressed concrete bridge and discuss the problems and results with other students.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 180 minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Structural Engineering: Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Geotechnical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Civil Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L0603: Design of Prestressed Structures and Concreet Bridges
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Günter Rombach
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

prestressed structures

  • basis of prestressed structures, field of application
  • differences between reinforced and prestressed concrete structures
  • history of prestressing
  • construction materials: concrete, tendons, ducts, anchorage systems
  • construction: prestressing methods
  • prestressing forces and member forces (friction, elongation)
  • tendon layout
  • time dependant prestressing losses
  • design of prestressed structures
  • design of anchorage region
  • non-bonded prestressing
  • prestressed flat slabs


Concrete bridges

  • history of bridges
  • design of bridges
  • loads on bridges
  • member forces for slab, T-beam, hollow box, frame and arch bridges
  • precast bridges - precast segmental bridges
  • bearings
  • abutments, columns
  • construction methods
  • damages - checking of bridges
Literature
  • Vorlesungsumdruckim STUDiP
  • Rombach, G. (2003): Spannbetonbau. Ernst & Sohn, Berlin
  • Wicke, M. (2002): Anwendung des Spannbetons. Betonkalender 2002, Teil II, S. 113-180, Verlag Ernst & Sohn, Berlin
  • Leonhardt, F. (1980): Vorlesungen über Massivbau. Teil 5: Spannbeton. Berlin
  • Mehlhorn, G. (2007): Handbuch Brücken, Springer Verlag
  • Schäfer, H.; Kaufeld, K. (1997): Massivbrücken. Betonkalender Teil II, S. 443ff, Ernst & Sohn, Berlin
  • Menn, Ch. (1986): Stahlbetonbrücken. Springer Verlag, Wien
Course L0604: Design of Prestressed Structures and Concreet Bridges
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Günter Rombach
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0977: Construction Logistics and Project Management

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Construction Logistics (L1163) Lecture 1 2
Construction Logistics (L1164) Recitation Section (small) 1 2
Project Development and Management (L1161) Lecture 1 1
Project Development and Management (L1162) Project-/problem-based Learning 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Heike Flämig
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge none
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students can...

  • give definitions of the main terms of construction logistics and project development and management
  • name advantages and disadvantages of internal or external construction logistics
  • explain characteristics of products, demand and production of construction objects and their consequences for construction specific supply chains
  • differentiate constructions logistics from other logistics systems
Skills

Students can...

  • carry out project life cycle assessments
  • apply methods and instruments of construction logistics
  • apply methods and instruments of project development and management
  • apply methods and instruments of conflict management
  • design supply and waste removal concepts for a construction project
Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students can...

  • hold presentations in and for groups
  • apply methods of conflict solving skills in group work and case studies
Autonomy

Students can...

  • solve problems by holistic, systemic and flow oriented thinking
  • improve their creativity, negotiation skills, conflict and crises solution skills by applying methods of moderation in case studies
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written elaboration
Examination duration and scale Two written papers with presentations
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Structural Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Geotechnical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Water and Traffic: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Civil Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Production and Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Infrastructure and Mobility: Elective Compulsory
Course L1163: Construction Logistics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Heike Flämig
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

The lecture gives deeper insight how important logistics are as a competetive factor for construction projects and which issues are to be adressed.

The following toppics are covered:

  • competetive factor logistics
  • the concept of systems, planning and coordination of logistics
  • material, equipment and reverse logistics
  • IT in construction logistics
  • elements of the planning model of construction logistics and their connections
  • flow oriented logistics systems for construction projects
  • logistics concepts for ready to use construction projects (especially procurement and waste removel logistics)
  • best practice examples (construction logistics Potsdamer Platz, recent case study of the region)

Contents of the lecture are deepened in special exercises.

Literature

Flämig, Heike: Produktionslogistik in Stadtregionen. In: Forschungsverbund Ökologische Mobilität (Hrsg.) Forschungsbericht Bd. 15.2. Wuppertal 2000.

Krauss, Siri: Die Baulogistik in der schlüsselfertigen Ausführung,  Bauwerk Verlag GmbH Berlin 2005.

Lipsmeier, Klaus: Abfallkennzahlen für Neubauleistungen im Hochbau : Verlag Forum für Abfallwirtschaft und Altlasten, 2004.

Schmidt, Norbert: Wettbewerbsfaktor Baulogistik. Neue Wertschöpfungspotenziale in der Baustoffversorgung. In: Klaus, Peter: Edition Logistik. Band 6. Deutscher Verkehrs-Verlag. Hamburg 2003.

Seemann, Y.F. (2007): Logistikkoordination als Organisationseinheit bei der Bauausführung Wissenschaftsverlag Mainz in Aachen, Aachen. (Mitteilungen aus dem Fachgebiet Baubetrieb und Bauwirtschaft (Hrsg. Kuhne, V.): Heft 20)


Course L1164: Construction Logistics
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Heike Flämig
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L1161: Project Development and Management
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Heike Flämig, Dr. Anton Worobei
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

Within the lecture, the main aspects of project development and management are tought:

  • Terms and definitions of project management
  • Advantages and disadvantages of different ways of project handling
  • organization, information, coordination and documentation
  • cost and fincance management in projects
  • time- and capacity management in projects
  • specific methods and instruments for successful team work

Contents of the lecture are deepened in special exercises.

Literature Projektmanagement-Fachmann. Band 1 und Band 2. RKW-Verlag, Eschborn, 2004.
Course L1162: Project Development and Management
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Heike Flämig, Dr. Anton Worobei
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0860: Harbour Engineering and Harbour Planning

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Harbour Engineering (L0809) Lecture 2 2
Harbour Engineering (L1414) Project-/problem-based Learning 1 2
Port Planning and Port Construction (L0378) Lecture 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Peter Fröhle
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Basics of coastal engineering
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students are able to define in details and to choose design approaches for the functional design of a port and apply them to design tasks. They can design the fundamental elements of a port.

Skills

The students are able to select and apply appropriate approaches for the functional design of ports.

Personal Competence
Social Competence The students are able to deploy their gained knowledge in applied problems such as the functional design of ports. Additionaly, they will be able to work in team with engineers of other disciplines.
Autonomy The students will be able to independently extend their knowledge and apply it to new problems.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale The duration of the examination is 150 min. The examination includes tasks with respect to the general understanding of the lecture contents and calculations tasks.
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Structural Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Geotechnical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Water and Traffic: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Civil Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L0809: Harbour Engineering
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Peter Fröhle
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Fundamentals of harbor engineering
    • Maritime transportation and waterways engineering
    • Ships
  • Elements of harbors
    • Harbor approaches and water-side harbor areas
    • Terminal design and handling of cargo
    • Quay-walls and piers
    • Equipment of harbors
    • Sluices and other special constructions
  • Connection to inland transportation / inland waterway transportation
  • Protection of harbors
    • Breakwaters and Jetties
    • Wave protection of harbors
  • Fishery and other small harbors


Literature Brinkmann, B.: Seehäfen, Springer 2005
Course L1414: Harbour Engineering
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Peter Fröhle
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L0378: Port Planning and Port Construction
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Frank Feindt
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Planning and implementation of major projects
  • Market analysis and traffic relations
  • Planning process and plan 
  • Port planning in urban neighborhood
  • Development of the logistics center "Port of Hamburg" in the metropolis
  • Quays and waterfront structure
  • Special planning Law Harbor - securing of a flexible use of the port
  • Dimensioning of quays
  • Flood protection structures
  • Port of Hamburg - Infrastructure and development
  • Preparation of areas
  • Scour formation in front of shore structures
Literature Vorlesungsumdruck, s. www.tu-harburg.de/gbt

Module M0581: Water Protection

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Water Protection and Wastewater Management (L0226) Lecture 3 3
Water Protection and Wastewater Management (L2008) Project Seminar 3 3
Module Responsible Prof. Ralf Otterpohl
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Basic knowledge in water management;
  • Good knowledge in urban drainage;
  • Good knowledge of wastewater treatment techniques;
  • Good knowledge of pollutants (e.g. COD, BOD, TS, N, P) and their properties;
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students can describe the basic principles of the regulatory framework related to the international and European water sector. They can explain limnological processes, substance cycles and water morphology in detail. They are able to assess complex problems related to water protection, such as ecosystem service and wastewater treatment with a special focus on innovative solutions, remediation measures as well as conceptual approaches.

Skills

Students can accurately assess current problems and situations in a country-specific or local context. They can suggest concrete actions to contribute to the planning of tomorrow's urban water cycle. Furthermore, they can suggest appropriate technical, administrative and legislative solutions to solve these problems.



Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students can work together in international groups.



Autonomy

Students are able to organize their work flow to prepare presentations and discussions. They can acquire appropriate knowledge by making enquiries independently.




Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Presentation
Examination duration and scale Term paper plus presentation
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Structural Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Geotechnical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Water and Traffic: Elective Compulsory
Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Water: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Civil Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Joint European Master in Environmental Studies - Cities and Sustainability: Specialisation Water: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Cities: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Water: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Environment: Compulsory
Course L0226: Water Protection and Wastewater Management
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Ralf Otterpohl
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

The lecture focusses on:

  • Regulatory Framework (e.g. WFD)
  • Main instruments for the water management and protection
  • In depth knowledge of relevant measures of water pollution control
  • Urban drainage, treatment options in different regions on the world
  • Rainwater management, improved management of heavy rainfalls, downpours, rainwater harvesting, rainwater infiltration
  • Case Studies and Field Trips
Literature

The literature listed below is available in the library of the TUHH.

  • Water and wastewater technology Hammer, M. J. 1., & . (2012). (7. ed., internat. ed.). Boston [u.a.]: Pearson Education International.
  • Water and wastewater engineering : design principles and practice: Davis, M. L. 1. (2011). . New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.
  • Biological wastewater treatment: (2011). C. P. Leslie Grady, Jr.  (3. ed.). London, Boca Raton,  Fla. [u.a.]: IWA Publ. 
Course L2008: Water Protection and Wastewater Management
Typ Project Seminar
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Ralf Otterpohl
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
Literature

Module M0595: Examination of Materials, Structural Condition and Damages

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Examination of Materials, Structural Condition and Damages (L0260) Lecture 3 4
Examination of Materials, Structural Condition and Damages (L0261) Recitation Section (small) 1 2
Module Responsible Prof. Frank Schmidt-Döhl
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Basic knowledge about building materials or material science, for example by the module Building Materials and Building Chemistry.
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students are able to describe the rules for trading, use and marking of construction products in Germany. They know which methods for the testing of building material properties are usable and know the limitations and characterics of the most important testing methods.

Skills

The students are able to responsibly discover the rules for trading and using of building products in Germany. 
They are able to chose suitable methods for the testing and inspection of construction products, the examination of damages and the examination of the structural conditions of buildings. They are able to conclude from symptons to the cause of damages. They are able to  describe an examination in form of a test report or expert opinion.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students can describe the different roles of manufacturers as well as testing, supervisory and certification bodies within the framework of material testing. They can describe the different roles of the participants in legal proceedings.


Autonomy The students are able to make the timing and the operation steps to learn the specialist knowledge of a very extensive field.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Structural Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Geotechnical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Water and Traffic: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Civil Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Materials Science: Specialisation Engineering Materials: Elective Compulsory
Course L0260: Examination of Materials, Structural Condition and Damages
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Frank Schmidt-Döhl
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content Materials testing and marking process of construction products, testing methods for building materials and structures, testing reports and expert opinions, describing the condition of a structure, from symptons to the cause of damages
Literature Frank Schmidt-Döhl: Materialprüfung im Bauwesen. Fraunhofer irb-Verlag, Stuttgart, 2013.
Course L0261: Examination of Materials, Structural Condition and Damages
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Frank Schmidt-Döhl
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0603: Nonlinear Structural Analysis

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Nonlinear Structural Analysis (L0277) Lecture 3 4
Nonlinear Structural Analysis (L0279) Recitation Section (small) 1 2
Module Responsible Prof. Alexander Düster
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Knowledge of partial differential equations is recommended.

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students are able to
+ give an overview of the different nonlinear phenomena in structural mechanics.
+ explain the mechanical background of nonlinear phenomena in structural mechanics.
+ to specify problems of nonlinear structural analysis, to identify them in a given situation and to explain their mathematical and mechanical background.

Skills

Students are able to
+ model nonlinear structural problems.
+ select for a given nonlinear structural problem a suitable computational procedure.
+ apply finite element procedures for nonlinear structural analysis.
+ critically verify and judge results of nonlinear finite elements.
+ to transfer their knowledge of nonlinear solution procedures to new problems.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to
+ solve problems in heterogeneous groups and to document the corresponding results.
+ share new knowledge with group members.

Autonomy

Students are able to
+
acquire independently knowledge to solve complex problems.


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Structural Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Civil Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Materials Science: Specialisation Modeling: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation System Design: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Ship and Offshore Technology: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Simulation Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L0277: Nonlinear Structural Analysis
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Alexander Düster
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

1. Introduction
2. Nonlinear phenomena
3. Mathematical preliminaries
4. Basic equations of continuum mechanics
5. Spatial discretization with finite elements
6. Solution of nonlinear systems of equations
7. Solution of elastoplastic problems
8. Stability problems
9. Contact problems

Literature

[1] Alexander Düster, Nonlinear Structrual Analysis, Lecture Notes, Technische Universität Hamburg-Harburg, 2014.
[2] Peter Wriggers, Nonlinear Finite Element Methods, Springer 2008.
[3] Peter Wriggers, Nichtlineare Finite-Elemente-Methoden, Springer 2001.
[4] Javier Bonet and Richard D. Wood, Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics for Finite Element Analysis, Cambridge University Press, 2008.

Course L0279: Nonlinear Structural Analysis
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Alexander Düster
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0699: Geotechnics III

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Numerical Methods in Geotechnics (L0375) Lecture 3 3
Advanced Foundation Engineering (L0497) Lecture 2 2
Advanced Foundation Engineering (L0498) Recitation Section (large) 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Jürgen Grabe
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
Skills
Personal Competence
Social Competence
Autonomy
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Structural Engineering: Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Geotechnical Engineering: Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Water and Traffic: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Civil Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L0375: Numerical Methods in Geotechnics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Dr. Hans Mathäus Stanford
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

Topics:

  • numerical simulations
  • numerical algorithms
  • finite element method
  • application of finite element method in geomechanics
  • constitutive models for soils
  • contact models for soil structure interaction
  • selected applications
Literature
  • Wriggers P. (2001): Nichtlineare Finite-Elemente-Methoden, Springer Verlag, Berlin
  • Bathe Klaus-Jürgen (2002): Finite-Elemente-Methoden. Springer Verlag, Berlin
Course L0497: Advanced Foundation Engineering
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Jürgen Grabe
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Vertical drains
  • Piles
  • Ground improvement (Deep Compaction, Soil mixing)
  • Vibration driving
  • Jet grouting
  • Slurry wall
  • Deep excavation
Literature
  • EAK (2002): Empfehlungen für Küstenschutzbauwerke
  • EAU (2004): Empfehlungen des Arbeitsausschusses Uferbauwerke
  • EAB (1988): Empfehlungen des Arbeitskreises Baugruben
  • Grundbau-Taschenbuch, Teil 1-3, (1997), Ernst & Sohn Verlag
Course L0498: Advanced Foundation Engineering
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Jürgen Grabe
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0858: Coastal Hydraulic Engineering I

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Basics of Coastal Engineering (L0807) Lecture 3 4
Basics of Coastal Engineering (L1413) Project-/problem-based Learning 1 2
Module Responsible Prof. Peter Fröhle
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Basics of hydraulic engineering, hydrology and hydromechanics
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students are able to define and explain the basic concepts of coastal engineering and port engineering. They are able to apply the concepts to selected practical problems of coastal engineering. Students can define and determine the basics for design and dimensioning of coastal engineering constructions.

Skills

The students are capable to apply basic design approaches to selected and pre-defined design tasks in coastal engineering.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to deploy their gained knowledge in applied problems such as the design of coastal protection structures. Additionaly, they will be able to work in team with engineers of other disciplines, for instance designing of coastal breakwaters.

Autonomy

The students will be able to independently extend their knowledge and applyit to new problems.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale The duration of the examination is 2 hours. The examination includes tasks with respect to the general understanding of the lecture contents and calculations tasks.
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Structural Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Geotechnical Engineering: Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Civil Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L0807: Basics of Coastal Engineering
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Peter Fröhle
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Basics of planning and design
    • Water levels
    • Currents
    • Waves
    • Ice
  • Planning and Design in Coastal Engineering
    • Functional and constructional design
    • Determination of design parameters
    • Design-approaches
      • Filter
      • Rubble mound constructions
      • Piles
      • Vertical constructions


Literature

Coastal Engineering Manual, CEM

Vorlesungsumdruck


Course L1413: Basics of Coastal Engineering
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Peter Fröhle
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0962: Sustainability and Risk Management

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Safety, Reliability and Risk Assessment (L1145) Seminar 2 3
Environment and Sustainability (L0319) Lecture 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Kerstin Kuchta
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge none
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students are able to describe single techniques and to give an overview for the field of safety and risk assessment as well as environmental and sustainable engineering, in detail:

  • basics in safety and reliability of technical facilities
  • safety and reliability analysis methods
  • risk assessment
  • Production and usage of bio-char
  • energy production and supply
  • sustainable product design


Skills

Students are able apply interdisciplinary system-oriented methods for risk assessment and sustainability reporting. They can evaluate the effort and costs for processes and select economically feasible treatment concepts.

Personal Competence
Social Competence
Autonomy

Students can gain knowledge of the subject area from given sources and transform it to new questions. Furthermore, they can define targets for new application or research-oriented duties in for risk management and sustainability concepts accordance with the potential social, economic and cultural impact.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written elaboration
Examination duration and scale Elaboration and presentation (45 minutes in groups)
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Bioprocess Engineering: Specialisation C - Bioeconomic Process Engineering, Focus Management and Controlling: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Civil Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Course L1145: Safety, Reliability and Risk Assessment
Typ Seminar
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Marco Ritzkowski
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

An introduction in safety and risk assessment is given and some typical problems of structural and environmental engineering are treated:

  • basics in safety and reliability of technical facilities
  • safety and reliability analysis methods
  • risk assessment
  • practical examples and excursions
  • discussions and presentations 
Literature

- Vorlesungsunterlagen

- Schneider, J., Schlatter, H.P.: Sicherheit und Zuverlässigkeit im Bauwesen. www.risksafety.ch/files/sicherheit_und_zuverlaessigkeit.pdf‎


Course L0319: Environment and Sustainability
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Kerstin Kuchta
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content This course presents actual methodologies and examples of environmental relevant, sustainable technologies, concepts and strategies in the field of energy supply, product design, water supply, waste water treatment or mobility. The following list show examples.
Production and Usage of Bio-char
Engergy production with algae
Environmental product design
Clean Development mechanism (CDM)
Democracy and Energy

New Concepts for a sustainable Energy Supply


Recycling of Wind Turbines
Alternative Mobility

Disposal of Nuclear Wastes
Waste2Energy
Offshore Wind energy

Literature Wird in der Veranstaltung bekannt gegeben.

Module M0963: Steel and Composite Structures

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Steel and Composite Structures (L1204) Lecture 2 2
Steel and Composite Structures (L1205) Recitation Section (large) 2 2
Steel Bridges (L1097) Lecture 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Marcus Rutner
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basics of steel construction (i.e. Steel Structures I and II, BUBC)

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

After successful completition, students can

  • describe the phenomenon of local buckling
  • explain warping torsion
  • illustrate the behaviour of composite structures
  • specify the principles in design of composite sttructures
  • sketch the contructions of steel and composite bridges
Skills

After successful participation students are able to

  • check stiffened and unstiffened plated structures
  • recognize and verify warping tosion in strucures
  • design composite structures
  • design bridges and o perform the detailing
Personal Competence
Social Competence --
Autonomy --
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 180 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Structural Engineering: Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Geotechnical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Water and Traffic: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Civil Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L1204: Steel and Composite Structures
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Marcus Rutner
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Local-buckling of plated structures
  • Warping torsion
  • Composite-girders, -columns, -slabs, -bridges
  • Principles in composite constructions
  • Bridge-design and -construction
Literature

Petersen, C.: Stahlbau, 4.Auflage 2013, Springer-Vieweg Verlag

Minnert, J. Wagenknecht, G.: Verbundbau-Praxis - Berechnung und Konstruktion nach Eurocode 4, 2.Auflage 2013, Bauwerk Beuth Verlag

Course L1205: Steel and Composite Structures
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Marcus Rutner
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L1097: Steel Bridges
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Yves Freundt
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

Lecture Contents ,Steel Bridge Construction'
Dr.-Ing. Jörg Ahlgrimm

- From tendering and contracting to completion - the development of a steel bridge

- Contents of a bridge static - structural details, examples of analysis in detail:

   -> effective width in regard to the longitudinal stiffeners

   -> Bearing point, bearing stiffener

   -> Crossbeam breakthrough, crossbeam reinforcement

   -> Analysis of the Rib-to-Floorbeam (RF) connection (web-tooth of the floorbeam  between trapezoidal shaped Ribs)

- Steel grades, -designation, testing methods and approval certificates

- Nondestructive weld inspecting

- Corrosion protection

- Bridge bearing - types, format, function, dimensioning, installation

- Expansion Joints

- Oscillation of bridge hangers and cables - oscillation damper

- Opening bridges- Detailed reviews to different assembling procedures and - implements

- Selective damage events

Requirements: Basic knowledge in the calculation, dimensioning, and construction of structural elements and joints of constructional steelwork

Literature


  • Herbert Schmidt, Ulrich Schulte, Rainer Zwätz, Lothar Bär:
    Ausführung von Stahlbauten

  • Petersen, Christian: Stahlbau, Abschnitt Brückenbau


  • Ahlgrimm, J., Lohrer, I.: Erneuerung der Eisenbahnüberführung in Fulda-Horas über die Fulda, Stahlbau 74 (2005), Heft 2, S. 114

Module M0964: Underground Constructions

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Applied Tunnel Constructions (L2407) Lecture 2 3
Introduction to tunnel construction (L0707) Lecture 1 2
Introduction to tunnel construction (L1811) Recitation Section (large) 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Jürgen Grabe
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Modules from Bachelor studies Civil and environmental engineering:

  • Geotechnics I-II
  • Steel Structures I-II
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge Knowledge of different tunnel construction types as well as special methods and techniques of subsoil construction. The students get deeper knowledge of steel and ground engineering as well as constructions knowledge concerning quay walls. Futhermore, the students get all the neccessary knowledge to design singular construction elements for sheet pile walls and they know how to choose the right construction elements depending on the influencing conditions.
Skills Basic knowledge of tunnel design as well as practical skills in structural tunnel analysis. Furthermore, the students are able to dimension sheet pile wall construction regarding all constrution elements, to choose the suitable construction elements with respect to the influencing conditions, to design all kinds of sheet pile walls (wave sheet pile walls and combined sheet pile walls) and to dimension all construction elements and connections.
Personal Competence
Social Competence Capacity for teamwork concerning project management and design of tunnels.
Autonomy Promotion of independent and creative work flow in the framework of a design exercise.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Structural Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Geotechnical Engineering: Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Water and Traffic: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Civil Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L2407: Applied Tunnel Constructions
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Jürgen Grabe, Tim Babendererde
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
Literature
Course L0707: Introduction to tunnel construction
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Marius Milatz
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Definitions
  • Historical development in tunneling
  • Geology for tunneling
  • Hard rock tunneling (construction composite and machines)
  • Tunnelung in temporarly stable soil with conventional construction methods
  • Tunneling in soft soils (form of supports, shield types, compressed air application)
  • Pipe jacking
  • Tunnel Lining, tunnel supporting structures
  • Calculation approaches for supporting structures in shield-driven tunnels
  • Surveying for tunneling
  • Safety requirements
  • Construction Contract
  • Literature and sources
Literature
  • Vorlesung/Übung s. www.tu-harburg.de/gbt
Course L1811: Introduction to tunnel construction
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Marius Milatz
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0713: Concrete Structures

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Concrete Structures (L0579) Seminar 1 1
Structural Concrete Members (L0577) Lecture 2 3
Structural Concrete Members (L0578) Recitation Section (large) 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Günter Rombach
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basics of structural analysis, conception and dimensioning of structural concrete

Modules: Reinforced Concrete Structures I+II, Structural Analysis I+II, Mechanics I+II



Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students broaden their skills in structural engineering, especially in the field of buildings (houses, roofs, halls). They dispose of the knowledge for the conception and design of concrete buildings and structural members that are often used. 

Skills

The students are able to apply procedures of the conception and dimensioning to to practical problems of structural engineering. They are capable to draft concrete buildings and to design them for general action effects and to plan their detailing and execution. Moreover, they can make design and construction sketches and draw up technical descriptions. 

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to obtain results of high quality in teamwork. 

Autonomy

The students are able to carry out complex conception and dimensioning tasks of structures under the guidance of tutors.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes None Presentation Es werden 2 Referate ausgegeben
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Structural Engineering: Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Geotechnical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Water and Traffic: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Civil Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L0579: Concrete Structures
Typ Seminar
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Günter Rombach
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

With help of a project teamwork the subjects of the course "Concrete Structures" is practiced, discussed and presented.


Literature - Projektbezogene Unterlagen werden abgegeben.
Course L0577: Structural Concrete Members
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Günter Rombach
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • skyscrapers: structural elements
  • actions on structrues
  • bracing systems
  • design orf slabs (line and point supported plates and floor slabs)
  • membranes and deep beams
  • folded plates and shells 
  • truss models
  • reinforced and prestressed members
Literature

Vorlesungsunterlagen können im STUDiP heruntergeladen werden

  • Zilch K., Zehetmaier G.: Bemessung im konstruktiven Ingenieurbau. Springer, Heidelberg 2010
  • König, G., Liphardt S.: Hochhäuser aus Stahlbeton, Betonkalender 2003, Teil II, Seite 1-69, Verlag Ernst & Sohn, Berlin 2003
  • Phocas, Marios C.: Hochhäuser : Tragwerk und Konstruktion, Stuttgart, Teubner, 2005
  • Deutscher Ausschuss für Stahlbeton: Heft 600: Erläuterungen zu DIN EN 1992-1-1, Beuth Verlag, Berlin 2012
  • Deutscher Ausschuss für Stahlbeton: Heft 240: Hilfsmittel zur Berechnung der Schnittgrößen und Formänderungen von Stahlbetontragwerken, Verlag Ernst & Sohn, Berlin 1978
  • Stiglat, K., Wippel, H.: Massive Platten - Ausgewählte Kapitel der Schnittkraftermittlung und Bemessung, Betonkalender 1992, Teil I, 287-366, Verlag Ernst & Sohn, Berlin 1992
  • Stiglat/Wippel: Platten. Verlag Ernst & Sohn, Berlin,1973
  • Schlaich J.; Schäfer K.: Konstruieren im Stahlbetonbau. Betonkalender 1998, Teil II, S. 721ff, Verlag Ernst & Sohn, Berlin, 1998
  • Dames K.-H.: Rohbauzeichnungen Bewehrungszeichnungen. Bauverlag, Wiesbaden 1997



Course L0578: Structural Concrete Members
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Günter Rombach
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Specialization II. Electrical Engineering

Module M0630: Robotics and Navigation in Medicine

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Robotics and Navigation in Medicine (L0335) Lecture 2 3
Robotics and Navigation in Medicine (L0338) Project Seminar 2 2
Robotics and Navigation in Medicine (L0336) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Alexander Schlaefer
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • principles of math (algebra, analysis/calculus)
  • principles of programming, e.g., in Java or C++
  • solid R or Matlab skills
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students can explain kinematics and tracking systems in clinical contexts and illustrate systems and their components in detail. Systems can be evaluated with respect to collision detection and  safety and regulations. Students can assess typical systems regarding design and  limitations.

Skills

The students are able to design and evaluate navigation systems and robotic systems for medical applications.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students discuss the results of other groups, provide helpful feedback and can incoorporate feedback into their work.

Autonomy

The students can reflect their knowledge and document the results of their work. They can present the results in an appropriate manner.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes 10 % Written elaboration
Yes 10 % Presentation
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula Computer Science: Specialisation II: Intelligence Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Electrical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Process Engineering and Biotechnology: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation Intelligent Systems and Robotics: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Bio- and Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L0335: Robotics and Navigation in Medicine
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Alexander Schlaefer
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

- kinematics
- calibration
- tracking systems
- navigation and image guidance
- motion compensation
The seminar extends and complements the contents of the lecture with respect to recent research results.


Literature

Spong et al.: Robot Modeling and Control, 2005
Troccaz: Medical Robotics, 2012
Further literature will be given in the lecture.

Course L0338: Robotics and Navigation in Medicine
Typ Project Seminar
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Alexander Schlaefer
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L0336: Robotics and Navigation in Medicine
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Alexander Schlaefer
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0673: Information Theory and Coding

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Information Theory and Coding (L0436) Lecture 3 4
Information Theory and Coding (L0438) Recitation Section (large) 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Gerhard Bauch
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Mathematics 1-3
  • Probability theory and random processes
  • Basic knowledge of communications engineering (e.g. from lecture "Fundamentals of Communications and Random Processes")
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge The students know the basic definitions for quantification of information in the sense of information theory. They know Shannon's source coding theorem and channel coding theorem and are able to determine theoretical limits of data compression and error-free data transmission over noisy channels. They understand the principles of source coding as well as error-detecting and error-correcting channel coding. They are familiar with the principles of decoding, in particular with modern methods of iterative decoding. They know fundamental coding schemes, their properties and decoding algorithms. 
Skills The students are able to determine the limits of data compression as well as of data transmission through noisy channels and based on those limits to design basic parameters of a transmission scheme. They can estimate the parameters of an error-detecting or error-correcting channel coding scheme for achieving certain performance targets. They are able to compare the properties of basic channel coding and decoding schemes regarding error correction capabilities, decoding delay, decoding complexity and to decide for a suitable method. They are capable of implementing basic coding and decoding schemes in software.
Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students can jointly solve specific problems.

Autonomy

The students are able to acquire relevant information from appropriate literature sources. They can control their level of knowledge during the lecture period by solving tutorial problems, software tools, clicker system.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Information and Communication Systems: Elective Compulsory
Computational Science and Engineering: Specialisation II. Engineering Science: Elective Compulsory
Information and Communication Systems: Core qualification: Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Electrical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L0436: Information Theory and Coding
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Gerhard Bauch
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Fundamentals of information theory

    • Self information, entropy, mutual information

    • Source coding theorem, channel coding theorem

    • Channel capacity of various channels

  • Fundamental source coding algorithms:

    • Huffman Code, Lempel Ziv Algorithm

  • Fundamentals of channel coding

    • Basic parameters of channel coding and respective bounds

    • Decoding principles: Maximum-A-Posteriori Decoding, Maximum-Likelihood Decoding, Hard-Decision-Decoding and Soft-Decision-Decoding

    • Error probability

  • Block codes

  • Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) Codes and iterative Ddecoding

  • Convolutional codes and Viterbi-Decoding

  • Turbo Codes and iterative decoding

  • Coded Modulation

Literature

Bossert, M.: Kanalcodierung. Oldenbourg.

Friedrichs, B.: Kanalcodierung. Springer.

Lin, S., Costello, D.: Error Control Coding. Prentice Hall.

Roth, R.: Introduction to Coding Theory.

Johnson, S.: Iterative Error Correction. Cambridge.

Richardson, T., Urbanke, R.: Modern Coding Theory. Cambridge University Press.

Gallager, R. G.: Information theory and reliable communication. Whiley-VCH

Cover, T., Thomas, J.: Elements of information theory. Wiley.

Course L0438: Information Theory and Coding
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Gerhard Bauch
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0712: Microwave Semiconductor Devices and Circuits I

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Microwave Semiconductor Devices and Circuits I (L0580) Lecture 3 4
Microwave Semiconductor Devices and Circuits I (L0581) Recitation Section (large) 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Alexander Kölpin
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Electrical Engineering IV, Microwave Engineering, Fundamentals of Semiconductor Technology


Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students are capable of explaining the functionality of amplifier, mixer, and oscillator in detail. They can present theories, concepts, and reasonable assumptions for description and synthesis of these devices. They are able to apply thorough knowledge of semiconductor physics of selected microwave devices to amplifier, mixer, and oscillator. They can compare different devices with respect to various parameters (such as frequency range, power und efficiency).


Skills

The students can assess occurring linear and nonlinear effects in active microwave circuits and are capable of analyzing and evaluating them. They are able to develop passive and active linear microwave circuits with the help of modern software-tools, taking application requirements into account.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to carry out subject-specific tasks in small groups, and to adequately present solutions (e.g. in CAD-Exercises).


Autonomy

The students are able to obtain additional information from given literature sources and set the content in context with the lecture. They can link and deepen their knowledge of other courses, e.g., Electrical Engineering IV, Theoretical Engineering, Microwave Engineering, Semiconductor Devices. The students acquire the ability to communicate problems and solutions in the field of microwave semiconductor devices and circuits in English.


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Oral exam
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Microwave Engineering, Optics, and Electromagnetic Compatibility: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Electrical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L0580: Microwave Semiconductor Devices and Circuits I
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Alexander Kölpin
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

- Amplifier: S-Parameters, stability, gain definitions; Bipolar Junction Transistor and HBT, MESFET and HEMT; Circuit applications, nonlinear distortions, low noise and power amplifier

- Mixer: Conversion matrix analysis; pn- and Schottky-diode, FET; Circuit applications, conversion gain and noise figure

- Oszillator: Oscillation start-up, steady state operation, stability; IMPATT-diode, Gunn-element, FET; oscillator stabilization

- Linear passive circuits: Planar microwave circuits, quarterwave matching circuits and discontinuities, lowpass-filter and bandpass-filter synthesis

- Design of active circuits


Literature

- E. Voges, „Hochfrequenztechnik“, Hüthig (2004)

- H.-G. Unger, W. Harth, „Hochfrequenz-Halbleiterelektronik“, S. Hirzel Verlag (1972)

- S.M. Sze, „Physics of Semiconductor Devices”, John Wiley & Sons (1981)
- A. Jacob, „Lecture Notes Microwave Semiconductor Devices and Circuits Part I“


Course L0581: Microwave Semiconductor Devices and Circuits I
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Alexander Kölpin
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0746: Microsystem Engineering

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Microsystem Engineering (L0680) Lecture 2 4
Microsystem Engineering (L0682) Project-/problem-based Learning 2 2
Module Responsible Dr. rer. nat. Thomas Kusserow
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Basic courses in physics, mathematics and electric engineering
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students know about the most important technologies and materials of MEMS as well as their applications in sensors and actuators.

Skills

Students are able to analyze and describe the functional behaviour of MEMS components and to evaluate the potential of microsystems.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to solve specific problems alone or in a group and to present the results accordingly.

Autonomy

Students are able to acquire particular knowledge using specialized literature and to integrate and associate this knowledge with other fields.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
No 10 % Presentation
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 2h
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Electrical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Mechatronics: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Mechatronics: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation System Design: Elective Compulsory
Microelectronics and Microsystems: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Bio- and Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L0680: Microsystem Engineering
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 92, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. rer. nat. Thomas Kusserow
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

Object and goal of MEMS

Scaling Rules

Lithography

Film deposition

Structuring and etching

Energy conversion and force generation

Electromagnetic Actuators

Reluctance motors

Piezoelectric actuators, bi-metal-actuator

Transducer principles

Signal detection and signal processing

Mechanical and physical sensors

Acceleration sensor, pressure sensor

Sensor arrays

System integration

Yield, test and reliability

Literature

M. Kasper: Mikrosystementwurf, Springer (2000)

M. Madou: Fundamentals of Microfabrication, CRC Press (1997)

Course L0682: Microsystem Engineering
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. rer. nat. Thomas Kusserow
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

Examples of MEMS components

Layout consideration

Electric, thermal and mechanical behaviour

Design aspects

Literature

Wird in der Veranstaltung bekannt gegeben

Module M0846: Control Systems Theory and Design

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Control Systems Theory and Design (L0656) Lecture 2 4
Control Systems Theory and Design (L0657) Recitation Section (small) 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Herbert Werner
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Introduction to Control Systems
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
  • Students can explain how linear dynamic systems are represented as state space models; they can interpret the system response to initial states or external excitation as trajectories in state space
  • They can explain the system properties controllability and observability, and their relationship to state feedback and state estimation, respectively
  • They can explain the significance of a minimal realisation
  • They can explain observer-based state feedback and how it can be used to achieve tracking and disturbance rejection
  • They can extend all of the above to multi-input multi-output systems
  • They can explain the z-transform and its relationship with the Laplace Transform
  • They can explain state space models and transfer function models of discrete-time systems
  • They can explain the experimental identification of ARX models of dynamic systems, and how the identification problem can be solved by solving a normal equation
  • They can explain how a state space model can be constructed from a discrete-time impulse response

Skills
  • Students can transform transfer function models into state space models and vice versa
  • They can assess controllability and observability and construct minimal realisations
  • They can design LQG controllers for multivariable plants
  •  They can carry out a controller design both in continuous-time and discrete-time domain, and decide which is  appropriate for a given sampling rate
  • They can identify transfer function models and state space models of dynamic systems from experimental data
  • They can carry out all these tasks using standard software tools (Matlab Control Toolbox, System Identification Toolbox, Simulink)

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students can work in small groups on specific problems to arrive at joint solutions. 

Autonomy

Students can obtain information from provided sources (lecture notes, software documentation, experiment guides) and use it when solving given problems.

They can assess their knowledge in weekly on-line tests and thereby control their learning progress.


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Energy Systems: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Computational Science and Engineering: Specialisation II. Engineering Science: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Electrical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Mechatronics: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Mechatronics: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Core qualification: Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Course L0656: Control Systems Theory and Design
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 92, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Herbert Werner
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

State space methods (single-input single-output)

• State space models and transfer functions, state feedback 
• Coordinate basis, similarity transformations 
• Solutions of state equations, matrix exponentials, Caley-Hamilton Theorem
• Controllability and pole placement 
• State estimation, observability, Kalman decomposition 
• Observer-based state feedback control, reference tracking 
• Transmission zeros
• Optimal pole placement, symmetric root locus 
Multi-input multi-output systems
• Transfer function matrices, state space models of multivariable systems, Gilbert realization 
• Poles and zeros of multivariable systems, minimal realization 
• Closed-loop stability
• Pole placement for multivariable systems, LQR design, Kalman filter 

Digital Control
• Discrete-time systems: difference equations and z-transform 
• Discrete-time state space models, sampled data systems, poles and zeros 
• Frequency response of sampled data systems, choice of sampling rate 

System identification and model order reduction 
• Least squares estimation, ARX models, persistent excitation 
• Identification of state space models, subspace identification 
• Balanced realization and model order reduction 

Case study
• Modelling and multivariable control of a process evaporator using Matlab and Simulink 
Software tools
• Matlab/Simulink

Literature
  • Werner, H., Lecture Notes „Control Systems Theory and Design“
  • T. Kailath "Linear Systems", Prentice Hall, 1980
  • K.J. Astrom, B. Wittenmark "Computer Controlled Systems" Prentice Hall, 1997
  • L. Ljung "System Identification - Theory for the User", Prentice Hall, 1999
Course L0657: Control Systems Theory and Design
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Herbert Werner
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0925: Digital Circuit Design

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Digital Circuit Design (L0698) Lecture 2 3
Advanced Digital Circuit Design (L0699) Lecture 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Matthias Kuhl
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
Skills
Personal Competence
Social Competence
Autonomy
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Oral exam
Examination duration and scale 40 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Nanoelectronics and Microsystems Technology: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Electrical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Mechatronics: Elective Compulsory
Microelectronics and Microsystems: Specialisation Microelectronics Complements: Elective Compulsory
Microelectronics and Microsystems: Specialisation Embedded Systems: Elective Compulsory
Course L0698: Digital Circuit Design
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Volkhard Klinger
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
Literature
Course L0699: Advanced Digital Circuit Design
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Volkhard Klinger
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content
Literature

Module M0676: Digital Communications

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Digital Communications (L0444) Lecture 2 3
Digital Communications (L0445) Recitation Section (large) 2 2
Laboratory Digital Communications (L0646) Practical Course 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Gerhard Bauch
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Mathematics 1-3
  • Signals and Systems
  • Fundamentals of Communications and Random Processes
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge The students are able to understand, compare and design modern digital information transmission schemes. They are familiar with the properties of linear and non-linear digital modulation methods. They can describe distortions caused by transmission channels and design and evaluate detectors including channel estimation and equalization. They know the principles of single carrier transmission and multi-carrier transmission as well as the fundamentals of basic multiple access schemes.
Skills The students are able to design and analyse a digital information transmission scheme including multiple access. They are able to choose a digital modulation scheme taking into account transmission rate, required bandwidth, error probability, and further signal properties. They can design an appropriate detector including channel estimation and equalization taking into account performance and complexity properties of suboptimum solutions. They are able to set parameters of a single carrier or multi carrier transmission scheme and trade the properties of both approaches against each other.
Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students can jointly solve specific problems.

Autonomy

The students are able to acquire relevant information from appropriate literature sources. They can control their level of knowledge during the lecture period by solving tutorial problems, software tools, clicker system.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes None Written elaboration
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Computational Science and Engineering: Specialisation II. Engineering Science: Elective Compulsory
Information and Communication Systems: Specialisation Communication Systems: Compulsory
Information and Communication Systems: Specialisation Secure and Dependable IT Systems, Focus Networks: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Information Technology: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Electrical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Microelectronics and Microsystems: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Course L0444: Digital Communications
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Gerhard Bauch
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Digital modulation methods

  • Coherent and non-coherent detection

  • Channel estimation and equalization

  • Single-Carrier- and multi carrier transmission schemes, multiple access schemes (TDMA, FDMA, CDMA, OFDM)

Literature

K. Kammeyer: Nachrichtenübertragung, Teubner

P.A. Höher: Grundlagen der digitalen Informationsübertragung, Teubner.

J.G. Proakis, M. Salehi: Digital Communications. McGraw-Hill.

S. Haykin: Communication Systems. Wiley

R.G. Gallager: Principles of Digital Communication. Cambridge

A. Goldsmith: Wireless Communication. Cambridge.

D. Tse, P. Viswanath: Fundamentals of Wireless Communication. Cambridge.

Course L0445: Digital Communications
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Gerhard Bauch
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L0646: Laboratory Digital Communications
Typ Practical Course
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Gerhard Bauch
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

- DSL transmission

- Random processes

- Digital data transmission

Literature

K. Kammeyer: Nachrichtenübertragung, Teubner

P.A. Höher: Grundlagen der digitalen Informationsübertragung, Teubner.

J.G. Proakis, M. Salehi: Digital Communications. McGraw-Hill.

S. Haykin: Communication Systems. Wiley

R.G. Gallager: Principles of Digital Communication. Cambridge

A. Goldsmith: Wireless Communication. Cambridge.

D. Tse, P. Viswanath: Fundamentals of Wireless Communication. Cambridge.

Module M1048: Integrated Circuit Design

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Integrated Circuit Design (L0691) Lecture 3 4
Integrated Circuit Design (L0998) Recitation Section (small) 1 2
Module Responsible Prof. Matthias Kuhl
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge of (solid-state) physics and mathematics.

Knowledge in fundamentals of electrical engineering and electrical networks.

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
  • Students can explain basic concepts of electron transport in semiconductor devices (energy bands, generation/recombination, carrier concentrations, drift and diffusion current densities, semiconductor device equations).  
  • Students are able to explain functional principles of pn-diodes, MOS capacitors, and MOSFETs using energy band diagrams.
  • Students can present and discuss current-voltage relationships and small-signal equivalent circuits of these devices.
  • Students can explain the physics and current-voltage behavior transistors based on charged carrier flow.
  • Students are able to explain the basic concepts for static and dynamic logic gates for integrated circuits
  • Students can exemplify approaches for low power consumption on the device and circuit level
  • Students can describe the potential and limitations of analytical expression for device and circuit analysis.
  • Students can explain characterization techniques for MOS devices.


Skills
  • Students can qualitatively construct energy band diagrams of the devices for varying applied voltages.
  • Students are able to qualitatively determine electric field, carrier concentrations, and charge flow from energy band diagrams.
  • Students can understand scientific publications from the field of semiconductor devices.
  • Students can calculate the dimensions of MOS devices in dependence of the circuits properties
  • Students can design complex electronic circuits and anticipate possible problems.
  • Students know procedure for optimization regarding high performance and low power consumption


Personal Competence
Social Competence
  • Students can team up with other experts in the field to work out innovative solutions.
  • Students are able to work by their own or in small groups for solving problems and answer scientific questions.
  • Students have the ability to critically question the value of their contributions to working groups.


Autonomy
  • Students are able to assess their knowledge in a realistic manner.
  • Students are able to define their personal approaches to solve challenging problems


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Nanoelectronics and Microsystems Technology: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Electrical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Mechatronics: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation System Design: Elective Compulsory
Microelectronics and Microsystems: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Course L0691: Integrated Circuit Design
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Matthias Kuhl
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Electron transport in semiconductors
  • Electronic operating principles of diodes, MOS capacitors, and MOS field-effect transistors
  • MOS transistor as four terminal device
  • Performace degradation due to short channel effects
  • Scaling-down of MOS technology
  • Digital logic circuits
  • Basic analog circuits
  • Operational amplifiers
  • Bipolar and BiCMOS circuits


Literature


  • Yuan Taur, Tak H. Ning:  Fundamentals of Modern VLSI Devices, Cambridge University Press 1998
  • R. Jacob Baker: CMOS, Circuit Design, Layout and Simulation,  IEEE Press, Wiley Interscience, 3rd Edition, 2010
  • Neil H.E. Weste and David Money Harris, Integrated Circuit Design, Pearson, 4th International Edition, 2013
  • John E. Ayers, Digital Integrated Circuits: Analysis and Design, CRC Press, 2009
  • Richard C. Jaeger and Travis N. Blalock: Microelectronic Circuit Design, Mc Graw-Hill, 4rd. Edition, 2010


Course L0998: Integrated Circuit Design
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Matthias Kuhl
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0548: Bioelectromagnetics: Principles and Applications

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Bioelectromagnetics: Principles and Applications (L0371) Lecture 3 5
Bioelectromagnetics: Principles and Applications (L0373) Recitation Section (small) 2 1
Module Responsible Prof. Christian Schuster
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic principles of physics


Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students can explain the basic principles, relationships, and methods of bioelectromagnetics, i.e. the quantification and application of electromagnetic fields in biological tissue. They can define and exemplify the most important physical phenomena and order them corresponding to wavelength and frequency of the fields. They can give an overview over measurement and numerical techniques for characterization of electromagnetic fields in practical applications . They can give examples for therapeutic and diagnostic utilization of electromagnetic fields in medical technology.


Skills

Students know how to apply various methods to characterize the behavior of electromagnetic fields in biological tissue.  In order to do this they can relate to and make use of the elementary solutions of Maxwell’s Equations. They are able to assess the most important effects that these models predict for biological tissue, they can order the effects corresponding to wavelength and frequency, respectively, and they can analyze them in a quantitative way. They are able to develop validation strategies for their predictions. They are able to evaluate the effects of electromagnetic fields for therapeutic and diagnostic applications and make an appropriate choice.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to work together on subject related tasks in small groups. They are able to present their results effectively in English (e.g. during small group exercises).


Autonomy

Students are capable to gather information from subject related, professional publications and relate that information to the context of the lecture. They are able to make a connection between their knowledge obtained in this lecture with the content of other lectures (e.g. theory of electromagnetic fields, fundamentals of electrical engineering / physics). They can communicate problems and effects in the field of bioelectromagnetics in English.


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes None Presentation
Examination Oral exam
Examination duration and scale 45 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Microwave Engineering, Optics, and Electromagnetic Compatibility: Elective Compulsory
Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Electrical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Bio- and Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L0371: Bioelectromagnetics: Principles and Applications
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 5
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 108, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Christian Schuster
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

- Fundamental properties of electromagnetic fields (phenomena)

- Mathematical description of electromagnetic fields (Maxwell’s Equations)

- Electromagnetic properties of biological tissue

- Principles of energy absorption in biological tissue, dosimetry

- Numerical methods for the computation of electromagnetic fields (especially FDTD)

- Measurement techniques for characterization of electromagnetic fields

- Behavior of electromagnetic fields of low frequency in biological tissue

- Behavior of electromagnetic fields of medium frequency in biological tissue

- Behavior of electromagnetic fields of high frequency in biological tissue

- Behavior of electromagnetic fields of very high frequency in biological tissue

- Diagnostic applications of electromagnetic fields in medical technology

- Therapeutic applications of electromagnetic fields in medical technology

- The human body as a generator of electromagnetic fields


Literature

- C. Furse, D. Christensen, C. Durney, "Basic Introduction to Bioelectromagnetics", CRC (2009)

- A. Vorst, A. Rosen, Y. Kotsuka, "RF/Microwave Interaction with Biological Tissues", Wiley (2006)

- S. Grimnes, O. Martinsen, "Bioelectricity and Bioimpedance Basics", Academic Press (2008)

- F. Barnes, B. Greenebaum, "Bioengineering and Biophysical Aspects of Electromagnetic Fields", CRC (2006)


Course L0373: Bioelectromagnetics: Principles and Applications
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 2, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Christian Schuster
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0710: Microwave Engineering

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Microwave Engineering (L0573) Lecture 2 3
Microwave Engineering (L0574) Recitation Section (large) 2 2
Microwave Engineering (L0575) Practical Course 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Alexander Kölpin
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Fundamentals of communication engineering, semiconductor devices and circuits. Basics of Wave propagation from transmission line theory and theoretical electrical engineering.

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students can explain the propagation of electromagnetic waves and related phenomena. They can describe transmission systems and components. They can name different types of antennas and describe the main characteristics of antennas. They can explain noise in linear circuits, compare different circuits using characteristic numbers and select the best one for specific scenarios.


Skills

Students are able to calculate the propagation of electromagnetic waves. They can analyze complete transmission systems und configure simple receiver circuits. They can calculate the characteristic of simple antennas and arrays based on the geometry. They can calculate the noise of receivers and the signal-to-noise-ratio of transmission systems. They can apply their theoretical knowledge to the practical courses.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students work together in small groups during the practical courses. Together they document, evaluate and discuss their results.


Autonomy

Students are able to relate the knowledge gained in the course to contents of previous lectures. With given instructions they can extract data needed to solve specific problems from external sources. They are able to apply their knowledge to the laboratory courses using the given instructions.


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes None Subject theoretical and practical work
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Information and Communication Systems: Specialisation Communication Systems: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Electrical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Microelectronics and Microsystems: Specialisation Communication and Signal Processing: Elective Compulsory
Course L0573: Microwave Engineering
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Alexander Kölpin
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

- Antennas: Analysis - Characteristics - Realizations

- Radio Wave Propagation

- Transmitter: Power Generation with Vacuum Tubes and Transistors

- Receiver: Preamplifier - Heterodyning - Noise

- Selected System Applications


Literature

H.-G. Unger, „Elektromagnetische Theorie für die Hochfrequenztechnik, Teil I“, Hüthig, Heidelberg, 1988

H.-G. Unger, „Hochfrequenztechnik in Funk und Radar“, Teubner, Stuttgart, 1994

E. Voges, „Hochfrequenztechnik - Teil II: Leistungsröhren, Antennen und Funkübertragung, Funk- und Radartechnik“, Hüthig, Heidelberg, 1991

E. Voges, „Hochfrequenztechnik“, Hüthig, Bonn, 2004


C.A. Balanis, “Antenna Theory”, John Wiley and Sons, 1982

R. E. Collin, “Foundations for Microwave Engineering”, McGraw-Hill, 1992

D. M. Pozar, “Microwave and RF Design of Wireless Systems”, John Wiley and Sons, 2001

D. M. Pozar, “Microwave Engineerin”, John Wiley and Sons, 2005


Course L0574: Microwave Engineering
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Alexander Kölpin
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L0575: Microwave Engineering
Typ Practical Course
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Alexander Kölpin
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Specialization II. Energy and Environmental Engineering

Module M0511: Electrical Energy from Solar Radiation and Wind Power

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Sustainability Management (L0007) Lecture 2 1
Hydro Power Use (L0013) Lecture 1 1
Wind Turbine Plants (L0011) Lecture 2 3
Wind Energy Use - Focus Offshore (L0012) Lecture 1 1
Module Responsible Dr. Isabel Höfer
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Module: Technical Thermodynamics I,

Module: Technical Thermodynamics II,

Module: Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

By ending this module students can explain in detail knowledge of wind turbines with a particular focus of wind energy use in offshore conditions and can critical comment these aspects in consideration of current developments. Furthermore, they are able to describe fundamentally the use of water power to generate electricity. The students reproduce and explain the basic procedure in the implementation of renewable energy projects in countries outside Europe.

Through active discussions of various topics within the seminar of the module, students improve their understanding and the application of the theoretical background and are thus able to transfer what they have learned in practice.

Skills  Students are able to apply the acquired theoretical foundations on exemplary water or wind power systems and evaluate and assess technically the resulting relationships in the context of dimensioning and operation of these energy systems. They can in compare critically the special procedure for the implementation of renewable energy projects in countries outside Europe with the in principle applied approach in Europe and can apply this procedure on exemplary theoretical projects.

Personal Competence
Social Competence  Students can discuss scientific tasks subjet-specificly and multidisciplinary within a seminar.

Autonomy

Students can independently exploit sources in the context of the emphasis of the lecture material to clear the contents of the lecture and to acquire the particular knowledge about the subject area.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 2.5 hours written exam + written elaboration (incl. presentation) in sustainability management
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Structural Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Geotechnical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Energy Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Renewable Energy: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Renewable Energies: Core qualification: Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Process Engineering: Specialisation Environmental Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Environment: Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Cities: Elective Compulsory
Course L0007: Sustainability Management
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 2, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Anne Rödl
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

The lecture "Sustainability Management" gives an insight into the different aspects and dimensions of sustainability. First, essential terms and definitions, significant developments of the last years, and legal framework conditions are explained. The various aspects of sustainability are then presented and discussed in detail. The lecture mainly focuses on concepts for the implementation of the topic sustainability in companies:

  • What is "sustainability"?
  • Why is this concept an important topic for companies?
  • What opportunities and business risks are addressed or are associated with it?
  • How can the often mentioned three pillars of sustainability - economy, ecology, and social- be meaningfully integrated into corporate management despite their sometimes contradictory tendencies, and how a corresponding compromise can be found?
  • What concepts or frameworks exist for the implementation of sustainability management in companies?
  • Which sustainability labels exist for products or companies? What do they have in common, and where do they differ?

Furthermore, the lecture is intended to provide insights into the concrete implementation of sustainability aspects into business practice. External lecturers from companies will be invited to report on how sustainability is integrated into their daily processes.

In the course of an independently carried out group work, the students will analyze and discuss the implementation of sustainability aspects based on short case studies. By studying and comparing best practice examples, the students will learn about corporate decisions' effects and implications. It should become clear which risks or opportunities are associated if sustainability aspects are taken into account in management decisions.

Literature

Die folgenden Bücher bieten einen Überblick:

Engelfried, J. (2011) Nachhaltiges Umweltmanagement. München: Oldenbourg Verlag. 2. Auflage

Corsten H., Roth S. (Hrsg.) (2011) Nachhaltigkeit - Unternehmerisches Handeln in globaler Verantwortung. Wiesbaden: Gabler Verlag.


Course L0013: Hydro Power Use
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Stefan Achleitner
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Introduction, importance of water power in the national and global context
  • Physical basics: Bernoulli's equation, usable height of fall, hydrological measures, loss mechanisms, efficiencies
  • Classification of Hydropower: Flow and Storage hydropower, low and high pressure systems
  • Construction of hydroelectric power plants: description of the individual components and their technical system interaction
  • Structural engineering components; representation of dams, weirs, dams, power houses, computer systems, etc.
  • Energy Technical Components: Illustration of the different types of hydraulic machinery, generators and grid connection
  • Hydropower and the Environment
  • Examples from practice

Literature
  • Schröder, W.; Euler, G.; Schneider, K.: Grundlagen des Wasserbaus; Werner, Düsseldorf, 1999, 4. Auflage
  • Quaschning, V.: Regenerative Energiesysteme: Technologie - Berechnung - Simulation; Carl Hanser, München, 2011, 7. Auflage
  • Giesecke, J.; Heimerl, S.; Mosony, E.: Wasserkraftanlagen ‑ Planung, Bau und Betrieb; Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2009, 5. Auflage
  • von König, F.; Jehle, C.: Bau von Wasserkraftanlagen - Praxisbezogene Planungsunterlagen; C. F. Müller, Heidelberg, 2005, 4. Auflage
  • Strobl, T.; Zunic, F.: Wasserbau: Aktuelle Grundlagen - Neue Entwicklungen; Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2006


Course L0011: Wind Turbine Plants
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Rudolf Zellermann
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Historical development
  • Wind: origins, geographic and temporal distribution, locations
  • Power coefficient, rotor thrust
  • Aerodynamics of the rotor
  • Operating performance
  • Power limitation, partial load, pitch and stall control
  • Plant selection, yield prediction, economy
  • Excursion
Literature

Gasch, R., Windkraftanlagen, 4. Auflage, Teubner-Verlag, 2005


Course L0012: Wind Energy Use - Focus Offshore
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Martin Skiba
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Introduction, importance of offshore wind power generation, Specific requirements for offshore engineering
  • Physical fundamentals for utilization of wind energy
  • Design and operation of offshore wind turbines, presentation of different concepts of offshore wind turbines, representation of the individual system components and their system-technical relationships
  • Foundation engineering, offshore site investigation, presentation of different concepts of offshore foundation structures, planning and fabrication of foundation structures
  • Electrical infrastructure of an offshore wind farm, Inner Park cabling, offshore substation, grid connection
  • Installation of offshore wind farms, installation techniques and auxiliary devices, construction logistics
  • Development and planning of offshore wind farms
  • Operation and optimization of offshore wind farms
  • Day excursion
Literature
  • Gasch, R.; Twele, J.: Windkraftanlagen - Grundlagen, Entwurf, Planung und Betrieb; Vieweg + Teubner, Stuttgart, 2007, 7. Auflage
  • Molly, J. P.: Windenergie - Theorie, Anwendung, Messung; C. F. Müller, Heidel-berg, 1997, 3. Auflage
  • Hau, E.: Windkraftanalagen; Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2008, 4.Auflage
  • Heier, S.: Windkraftanlagen - Systemauslegung, Integration und Regelung; Vieweg + Teubner, Stuttgart, 2009, 5. Auflage
  • Jarass, L.; Obermair, G.M.; Voigt, W.: Windenergie: Zuverlässige Integration in die Energieversorgung; Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2009, 2. Auflage


Module M0512: Use of Solar Energy

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Energy Meteorology (L0016) Lecture 1 1
Energy Meteorology (L0017) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Collector Technology (L0018) Lecture 2 2
Solar Power Generation (L0015) Lecture 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Martin Kaltschmitt
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge none
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

With the completion of this module, students will be able to deal with technical foundations and current issues and problems in the field of solar energy and explain and evaulate these critically in consideration of the prior curriculum and current subject specific issues. In particular they can professionally describe the processes within a solar cell and explain the specific features of application of solar modules. Furthermore, they can provide an overview of the collector technology in solar thermal systems.

Skills

Students can apply the acquired theoretical foundations of exemplary energy systems using solar radiation. In this context, for example they can assess and evaluate potential and constraints of solar energy systems with respect to different geographical assumptions. They are able to dimension solar energy systems in consideration of technical aspects and given assumptions. Using module-comprehensive knowledge students can evalute the economic and ecologic conditions of these systems. They can select calculation methods within the radiation theory for these topics. 


Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to discuss issues in the thematic fields in the renewable energy sector addressed within the module.

Autonomy

Students can independently exploit sources and acquire the particular knowledge about the subject area with respect to emphasis fo the lectures. Furthermore, with the assistance of lecturers, they can discrete use calculation methods for analysing and dimensioning solar energy systems. Based on this procedure they can concrete assess their specific learning level and can consequently define the further workflow. 

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 3 hours written exam
Assignment for the Following Curricula Energy and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy Systems: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Renewable Energy: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Renewable Energies: Core qualification: Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Process Engineering: Specialisation Environmental Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L0016: Energy Meteorology
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Dr. Volker Matthias, Dr. Beate Geyer
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Introduction: radiation source Sun, Astronomical Foundations, Fundamentals of radiation
  • Structure of the atmosphere
  • Properties and laws of radiation
    • Polarization
    • Radiation quantities 
    • Planck's radiation law
    • Wien's displacement law
    • Stefan-Boltzmann law
    • Kirchhoff's law
    • Brightness temperature
    • Absorption, reflection, transmission
  • Radiation balance, global radiation, energy balance
  • Atmospheric extinction
  • Mie and Rayleigh scattering
  • Radiative transfer
  • Optical effects in the atmosphere
  • Calculation of the sun and calculate radiation on inclined surfaces
Literature
  • Helmut Kraus: Die Atmosphäre der Erde
  • Hans Häckel: Meteorologie
  • Grant W. Petty: A First Course in Atmosheric Radiation
  • Martin Kaltschmitt, Wolfgang Streicher, Andreas Wiese: Renewable Energy
  • Alexander Löw, Volker Matthias: Skript Optik Strahlung Fernerkundung


Course L0017: Energy Meteorology
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Dr. Beate Geyer
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L0018: Collector Technology
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Agis Papadopoulos
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Introduction: Energy demand and application of solar energy.
  • Heat transfer in the solar thermal energy: conduction, convection, radiation.
  • Collectors: Types, structure, efficiency, dimensioning, concentrated systems.
  • Energy storage: Requirements, types.
  • Passive solar energy: components and systems.
  • Solar thermal low temperature systems: collector variants, construction, calculation.
  • Solar thermal high temperature systems: Classification of solar power plants construction.
  • Solar air conditioning.
Literature
  • Vorlesungsskript.
  • Kaltschmitt, Streicher und Wiese (Hrsg.). Erneuerbare Energien: Systemtechnik, Wirtschaftlichkeit, Umweltaspekte, 5. Auflage, Springer, 2013.
  • Stieglitz und Heinzel .Thermische Solarenergie: Grundlagen, Technologie, Anwendungen. Springer, 2012.
  • Von Böckh und Wetzel. Wärmeübertragung: Grundlagen und Praxis, Springer, 2011.
  • Baehr und Stephan. Wärme- und Stoffübertragung. Springer, 2009.
  • de Vos. Thermodynamics of solar energy conversion. Wiley-VCH, 2008.
  • Mohr, Svoboda und Unger. Praxis solarthermischer Kraftwerke. Springer, 1999.


Course L0015: Solar Power Generation
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Martin Schlecht, Prof. Alf Mews, Roman Fritsches, Paola Pignatelli
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

Photovoltaics:

  1. Introduction
  2. Primary energies and consumption, available solar energy
  3. Physics of the ideal solar cell
  4. Light absorption, PN transition, characteristic sizes of the solar cell, efficiency
  5. Physics of the real solar cell
  6. Charge carrier recombination, characteristic curves, barrier layer recombination, equivalent circuit diagram
  7. Increasing efficiency
  8. Methods for increasing the quantum yield and reducing recombination
  9. Hetero- and tandem structures
  10. Heterojunction, Schottky, electrochemical, MIS and SIS cell, tandem cell
  11. Concentrator cells
  12. Concentrator optics and tracking systems, concentrator cells
  13. Technology and properties: solar cell types, manufacturing, monocrystalline silicon and gallium arsenide, polycrystalline silicon and silicon thin film cells, thin film cells on carriers (amorphous silicon, CIS, electrochemical cells)
  14. Modules
  15. Switches

Concentrating solar power plants:

  1. Introduction
  2. Point focused technologies
  3. Line focused technologies
  4. Design of CSP projects
Literature
  • A. Götzberger, B. Voß, J. Knobloch: Sonnenenergie: Photovoltaik, Teubner Studienskripten, Stuttgart, 1995
  • A. Götzberger: Sonnenenergie: Photovoltaik : Physik und Technologie der Solarzelle, Teubner Stuttgart, 1994
  • H.-J. Lewerenz, H. Jungblut: Photovoltaik, Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 1995
  • A. Götzberger: Photovoltaic solar energy generation, Springer, Berlin, 2005
  • C. Hu, R. M. White: Solar CelIs, Mc Graw HilI, New York, 1983
  • H.-G. Wagemann: Grundlagen der photovoltaischen Energiewandlung: Solarstrahlung, Halbleitereigenschaften und Solarzellenkonzepte, Teubner, Stuttgart, 1994
  • R. J. van Overstraeten, R.P. Mertens: Physics, technology and use of photovoltaics, Adam Hilger Ltd, Bristol and Boston, 1986
  • B. O. Seraphin: Solar energy conversion Topics of applied physics V 01 31, Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 1995
  • P. Würfel: Physics of Solar cells, Principles and new concepts, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim 2005
  • U. Rindelhardt: Photovoltaische Stromversorgung, Teubner-Reihe Umwelt, Stuttgart 2001
  • V. Quaschning: Regenerative Energiesysteme, Hanser, München, 2003
  • G. Schmitz: Regenerative Energien, Ringvorlesung TU Hamburg-Harburg 1994/95, Institut für Energietechnik

Module M0513: System Aspects of Renewable Energies

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Fuel Cells, Batteries, and Gas Storage: New Materials for Energy Production and Storage (L0021) Lecture 2 2
Energy Trading (L0019) Lecture 1 1
Energy Trading (L0020) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Deep Geothermal Energy (L0025) Lecture 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Martin Kaltschmitt
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Module: Technical Thermodynamics I

Module: Technical Thermodynamics II

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge Students are able to describe the processes in energy trading and the design of energy markets and can critically evaluate them in relation to current subject specific problems. Furthermore, they are able to explain the basics of thermodynamics of electrochemical energy conversion in fuel cells and can establish and explain the relationship to different types of fuel cells and their respective structure. Students can compare this technology with other energy storage options. In addition, students can give an overview of the procedure and the energetic involvement of deep geothermal energy.

Skills

Students can apply the learned knowledge of storage systems for excessive energy to explain for various energy systems different approaches to ensure a secure energy supply. In particular, they can plan and calculate domestic, commercial and industrial heating equipment using energy storage systems in an energy-efficient way and can assess them in relation to complex power systems. In this context, students can assess the potential and limits of geothermal power plants and explain their operating mode.

Furthermore, the students are able to explain the procedures and strategies for marketing of energy and apply it in the context of other modules on renewable energy projects. In this context they can unassistedly carry out analysis and evaluations of energie markets and energy trades. 

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to discuss issues in the thematic fields in the renewable energy sector addressed within the module.

Autonomy

Students can independently exploit sources , acquire the particular knowledge about the subject area and transform it to new questions.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 3 hours written exam
Assignment for the Following Curricula Bioprocess Engineering: Specialisation A - General Bioprocess Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Energy Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Renewable Energy: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Process Engineering and Biotechnology: Elective Compulsory
Renewable Energies: Core qualification: Compulsory
Process Engineering: Specialisation Environmental Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Process Engineering: Specialisation Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Water: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Environment: Elective Compulsory
Course L0021: Fuel Cells, Batteries, and Gas Storage: New Materials for Energy Production and Storage
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Michael Fröba
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  1. Introduction to electrochemical energy conversion
  2. Function and structure of electrolyte
  3. Low-temperature fuel cell
    • Types
    • Thermodynamics of the PEM fuel cell
    • Cooling and humidification strategy
  4. High-temperature fuel cell
    • The MCFC
    • The SOFC
    • Integration Strategies and partial reforming
  5. Fuels
    • Supply of fuel
    • Reforming of natural gas and biogas
    • Reforming of liquid hydrocarbons
  6. Energetic Integration and control of fuel cell systems


Literature
  • Hamann, C.; Vielstich, W.: Elektrochemie 3. Aufl.; Weinheim: Wiley - VCH, 2003


Course L0019: Energy Trading
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Michael Sagorje, Dr. Sven Orlowski
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Basic concepts and tradable products in energy markets
  • Primary energy markets
  • Electricity Markets
  • European Emissions Trading Scheme
  • Influence of renewable energy
  • Real options
  • Risk management

Within the exercise the various tasks are actively discussed and applied to various cases of application.

Literature
Course L0020: Energy Trading
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Michael Sagorje, Dr. Sven Orlowski
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L0025: Deep Geothermal Energy
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Ben Norden
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  1. Introduction to the deep geothermal use
  2. Geological Basics I
  3. Geological Basics II
  4. Geology and thermal aspects
  5. Rock Physical Aspects
  6. Geochemical aspects
  7. Exploration of deep geothermal reservoirs
  8. Drilling technologies, piping and expansion
  9. Borehole Geophysics
  10. Underground system characterization and reservoir engineering
  11. Microbiology and Upper-day system components
  12. Adapted investment concepts, cost and environmental aspect
Literature
  • Dipippo, R.: Geothermal Power Plants: Principles, Applications, Case Studies and Environmental Impact. Butterworth Heinemann; 3rd revised edition. (29. Mai 2012)
  • www.geo-energy.org
  • Edenhofer et al. (eds): Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation; Special Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, 2012.
  • Kaltschmitt et al. (eds): Erneuerbare Energien: Systemtechnik, Wirtschaftlichkeit, Umweltaspekte. Springer, 5. Aufl. 2013.
  • Kaltschmitt et al. (eds): Energie aus Erdwärme. Spektrum Akademischer Verlag; Auflage: 1999 (3. September 2001)
  • Huenges, E. (ed.): Geothermal Energy Systems: Exploration, Development, and Utilization. Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA; Auflage: 1. Auflage (19. April 2010)


Module M0874: Wastewater Systems

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Wastewater Systems - Collection, Treatment and Reuse (L0934) Lecture 2 2
Wastewater Systems - Collection, Treatment and Reuse (L0943) Recitation Section (large) 1 1
Advanced Wastewater Treatment (L0357) Lecture 2 2
Advanced Wastewater Treatment (L0358) Recitation Section (large) 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Ralf Otterpohl
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Knowledge of wastewater management and the key processes involved in wastewater treatment.

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students are able to outline key areas of the full range of treatment systems in waste water management, as well as their mutual dependence for sustainable water protection. They can describe relevant economic, environmental and social factors.

Skills

Students are able to pre-design and explain the available wastewater treatment processes and the scope of their application in municipal and for some industrial treatment plants.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Social skills are not targeted in this module.

Autonomy

Students are in a position to work on a subject and to organize their work flow independently. They can also present on this subject.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Structural Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Geotechnical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Water and Traffic: Compulsory
Bioprocess Engineering: Specialisation A - General Bioprocess Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Water: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Process Engineering and Biotechnology: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Process Engineering: Specialisation Environmental Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Process Engineering: Specialisation Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Water: Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Environment: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Cities: Compulsory
Course L0934: Wastewater Systems - Collection, Treatment and Reuse
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Ralf Otterpohl
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content •Understanding the global situation with water and wastewater

•Regional planning and decentralised systems

•Overview on innovative approaches

•In depth knowledge on advanced wastewater treatment options for different situations, for end-of-pipe and reuse

•Mathematical Modelling of Nitrogen Removal

•Exercises with calculations and design

Literature

Henze, Mogens:
Wastewater Treatment: Biological and Chemical Processes, Springer 2002, 430 pages

George Tchobanoglous, Franklin L. Burton, H. David Stensel:
Wastewater Engineering: Treatment and Reuse, Metcalf & Eddy
McGraw-Hill, 2004 - 1819 pages

Course L0943: Wastewater Systems - Collection, Treatment and Reuse
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Ralf Otterpohl
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L0357: Advanced Wastewater Treatment
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Joachim Behrendt
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

Survey on advanced wastewater treatment

reuse of reclaimed municipal wastewater

Precipitation

Flocculation

Depth filtration

Membrane Processes

Activated carbon adsorption

Ozonation

"Advanced Oxidation Processes"

Disinfection

Literature

Metcalf & Eddy, Wastewater Engineering: Treatment and Reuse, McGraw-Hill, Boston 2003

Wassertechnologie, H.H. Hahn, Springer-Verlag, Berlin 1987

Membranverfahren: Grundlagen der Modul- und Anlagenauslegung, T. Melin und R. Rautenbach, Springer-Verlag, Berlin 2007

Trinkwasserdesinfektion: Grundlagen, Verfahren, Anlagen, Geräte, Mikrobiologie, Chlorung, Ozonung, UV-Bestrahlung, Membranfiltration, Qualitätssicherung, W. Roeske, Oldenbourg-Verlag, München 2006

Organische Problemstoffe in Abwässern, H. Gulyas, GFEU, Hamburg 2003
Course L0358: Advanced Wastewater Treatment
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Dr. Joachim Behrendt
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

Aggregate organic compounds (sum parameters)

Industrial wastewater

Processes for industrial wastewater treatment

Precipitation

Flocculation

Activated carbon adsorption

Recalcitrant organic compounds


Literature

Metcalf & Eddy, Wastewater Engineering: Treatment and Reuse, McGraw-Hill, Boston 2003

Wassertechnologie, H.H. Hahn, Springer-Verlag, Berlin 1987

Membranverfahren: Grundlagen der Modul- und Anlagenauslegung, T. Melin und R. Rautenbach, Springer-Verlag, Berlin 2007

Trinkwasserdesinfektion: Grundlagen, Verfahren, Anlagen, Geräte, Mikrobiologie, Chlorung, Ozonung, UV-Bestrahlung, Membranfiltration, Qualitätssicherung, W. Roeske, Oldenbourg-Verlag, München 2006

Organische Problemstoffe in Abwässern, H. Gulyas, GFEU, Hamburg 2003

Module M0721: Air Conditioning

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Air Conditioning (L0594) Lecture 3 5
Air Conditioning (L0595) Recitation Section (large) 1 1
Module Responsible NN
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Technical Thermodynamics I, II, Fluid Dynamics, Heat Transfer
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students know the different kinds of air conditioning systems for buildings and mobile applications and how these systems are controlled. They are familiar with the change of state of humid air and are able to draw the state changes in a h1+x,x-diagram. They are able to calculate the minimum airflow needed for hygienic conditions in rooms and can choose suitable filters. They know the basic flow pattern in rooms and are able to calculate the air velocity in rooms with the help of simple methods. They know the principles  to calculate an air duct network. They know the different possibilities to produce cold and are able to draw these processes into suitable thermodynamic diagrams. They know the criteria for the assessment of refrigerants.


Skills

Students are able to configure air condition systems for buildings and mobile applications.  They are able to calculate an air duct network and have the ability to perform simple planning tasks, regarding natural heat sources and heat sinks. They can transfer research knowledge into practice. They are able to perform scientific work in the field of air conditioning.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to discuss in small groups and develop an approach.

    


Autonomy

Students are able to define independently tasks, to get new knowledge from existing knowledge as well as to find ways to use the knowledge in practice.


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Energy and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy Systems: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Energy Systems: Specialisation Marine Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Aviation Systems: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Process Engineering: Specialisation Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L0594: Air Conditioning
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 5
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 108, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer NN
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

1. Overview

1.1 Kinds of air conditioning systems

1.2 Ventilating

1.3 Function of an air condition system

2. Thermodynamic processes

2.1 Psychrometric chart

2.2 Mixer preheater, heater

2.3 Cooler

2.4 Humidifier

2.5 Air conditioning process in a Psychrometric chart

2.6 Desiccant assisted air conditioning

3. Calculation of heating and cooling loads

3.1 Heating loads

3.2 Cooling loads

3.3 Calculation of inner cooling load

3.4 Calculation of outer cooling load

4. Ventilating systems

4.1 Fresh air demand

4.2 Air flow in rooms

4.3 Calculation of duct systems

4.4 Fans

4.5 Filters

5. Refrigeration systems

5.1. compression chillers

5.2Absorption chillers

Literature
  • Schmitz, G.: Klimaanlagen, Skript zur Vorlesung
  • VDI Wärmeatlas, 11. Auflage, Springer Verlag, Düsseldorf 2013
  • Herwig, H.; Moschallski, A.: Wärmeübertragung, Vieweg+Teubner Verlag, Wiesbaden 2009
  • Recknagel, H.;  Sprenger, E.; Schrammek, E.-R.: Taschenbuch für Heizung- und Klimatechnik 2013/2014, 76. Auflage, Deutscher Industrieverlag, 2013



Course L0595: Air Conditioning
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer NN
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0641: Steam Generators

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Steam Generators (L0213) Lecture 3 5
Steam Generators (L0214) Recitation Section (large) 1 1
Module Responsible Dr. Kristin Abel-Günther
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • "Technical Thermodynamics I and II"
  • "Heat Transfer"
  • "Fluid Mechanics"
  • "Steam Power Plants"
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students know the thermodynamic base principles for steam generators and their types. They are able to describe the basic principles of steam generators and sketch the combustion and fuel supply aspects of fossil-fuelled power plants. They can perform thermal design calculations and conceive the water-steam side, as well as they are able to define the constructive details of the steam generator. The students can describe and evaluate the operational behaviour of steam generators and explain these in the context of related disciplines.

Skills

The students will be able, using detailed knowledge on the calculation, design, and construction of steam generators, linked with a wide theoretical and methodical foundation, to understand the main design and construction aspects of steam generators. Through problem definition and formalisation, modelling of processes, and training in the solution methodology for partial problems a good overview of this key component of the power plant will be obtained.

Within the framework of the exercise the students obtain the ability to draw the balances, and design the steam generator and its components. For this purpose small but close to lifelike tasks are solved, to highlight aspects of the design of steam generators.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Especially during the exercises the focus is placed on communication with the tutor. This animates the students to reflect on their existing knowledge and ask specific questions to further improve their understanding. 

Autonomy

The students will be able to perform basic calculations covering aspects of the steam generator, with only the help of smaller clues, on their own. This way the theoretical and practical knowledge from the lecture is consolidated and the potential effects from different process schemata and boundary conditions are highlighted.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
No 5 % Excercises Den Studierenden wird eine kleine Aufgabe (in ca. 5 min lösbar) zur Vorlesung der Vorwoche gestellt. Die Antworten müssen üblicherweise als Freitext gegeben werden, aber auch Zeichnungen, Stichpunkte oder, in seltenen Fällen, Multiple Choice sind möglich.
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Energy Systems: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Energy Systems: Specialisation Marine Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy Systems: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L0213: Steam Generators
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 5
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 108, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Dr. Kristin Abel-Günther
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Thermodynamics of steam
  • Basic principles of steam generators
  • Types of steam generators
  • Fuels and combustion systems
  • Coal pulverisers and coal drying
  • Modes of operation
  • Thermal analysis and design
  • Fluid dynamics in steam generators
  • Design of the water-steam side
  • Construction aspects
  • Stress analysis
  • Feed water for steam generators
  • Operating behaviour of steam Generators
Literature
  • Dolezal, R.: Dampferzeugung. Springer-Verlag, 1985
  • Thomas, H.J.: Thermische Kraftanlagen. Springer-Verlag, 1985
  • Steinmüller-Taschenbuch: Dampferzeuger-Technik. Vulkan-Verlag, Essen, 1992
  • Kakaç, Sadık: Boilers, Evaporators and Condensers. John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1991
  • Stultz, S.C. and Kitto, J.B. (Ed.): Steam - its generation and use. 40th edition, The Babcock & Wilcox Company, Barberton, Ohio, USA, 1992
Course L0214: Steam Generators
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Dr. Kristin Abel-Günther
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1000: Combined Heat and Power and Combustion Technology

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Combined Heat and Power and Combustion Technology (L0216) Lecture 3 5
Combined Heat and Power and Combustion Technology (L0220) Recitation Section (large) 1 1
Module Responsible Dr. Kristin Abel-Günther
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • "Gas-Steam Power Plants"
  • "Technical Thermodynamics I and II"
  • "Heat Transfer"
  • "Fluid Mechanics"
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

VBT/Combustion Engineering

The students outline the thermodynamic and chemical fundamentals of combustion processes and the main characteristics of various fuels. They gain basic knowledge in reaction kinetics and fundamentals of furnace design. The students are able to describe the formation of emissions and the primary reduction measures, and evaluate the impact of regulations and allowable limit levels.

KWK/Combined Heat and Power 

The students present the layout, design and operation of Combined Heat and Power plants and are in a position to compare with each other district heating plants with back-pressure steam turbine or condensing turbine with pressure-controlled extraction tapping, CHP plants with gas turbine or with combined steam and gas turbine, or even district heating plants with an internal combustion engine. They can explain and analyse aspects of combined heat, power and cooling (CCHP) and describe the layout of the key components needed. Through this specialised knowledge they are able to evaluate the ecological significance of district CHP generation, as well as its economics.

Storage Technologies

The students present the layout, design and operation of electrical and heat storage technologies and are able to classify these in regards of their optimum operating range and conditions in power plants and complex energy systems. They evaluate the environmental effects of the storage technologies.

Skills

The students will be able to identify optimization possibilities due to combined power and heat production and the usage of short, medium and long-term storage technologies. The detailed understanding of the complete energy conversion chain, starting with the combustion of a fuel, the conversion of the primary energy into heat and power, storage and discharge of the storage enables the students to evaluate the efficiency and economies of the processes and to holistically consider energy utilisation. Examples from practical experience, such as the CHP energy supply facility of the TUHH and the district heating network of Hamburg will be used, to highlight the potential from electricity generation plants with simultaneous heat extraction and storage.

Within the framework of the exercises the students deepen their knowledge based on examples from the industries.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Especially during the exercises the focus is placed on communication with the tutor. This animates the students to reflect on their existing knowledge and ask specific questions for improving further this knowledge level. 

Autonomy

The students assisted by the tutors will be able to perform estimating calculations. In this manner the theoretical and practical knowledge from the lecture is consolidated and the potential impact of different process arrangements and boundary conditions highlighted.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
No 10 % Written elaboration Am Ende jeder Vorlesung wird schriftlich eine zu auswertende Kurzfrage (5-10 min) zu der Vorlesung der Vorwoche gestellt. In den Kurzfragen werden kleine Rechenaufgaben, Skizzen oder auch kleine Freitexte zur Beantwortung gestellt.
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Energy Systems: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Energy Systems: Specialisation Marine Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy Systems: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L0216: Combined Heat and Power and Combustion Technology
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 5
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 108, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Dr. Kristin Abel-Günther
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

Part 1: Combustion Engineering

  • Thermodynamic and chemical fundamentals
  • Fuels
  • Reaction kinetics
  • Premixed flames
  • Systematik of flames and combustion chambers
  • Combustion Chamber design
  • Reduction of Emissions

Part 2: Energy Storage

1.Motivation: Why is Energy storage essential ?

2.Storage of electrical energy

  • Condensers
  • Akkumulators
  • Hydro power stations
  • Short term storage with fly wheels
  • Compressed air energy storage CAES
  • Economics

3.Heat Storage

  • Sensible heat storage
  • Latent heat storage
  • Thermocheical heat storage
  • Economics

4.Sector coupling and Power to X

  • PtG
  • PtL
  • Research on PtX


Part 3: "Combined Heat and Power":

  • Layout, design and operation of Combined Heat and Power plants
  • District heating plants with back-pressure steam turbine and condensing turbine with pressure-controlled extraction tapping
  • District heating plants with gas turbine
  • District heating plants with combined steam and gas turbine
  • District heating plants with motor engine
  • Combined cooling heat and power (CCHP)
  • Layout of the key components
  • Regulatory framework and allowable limits
  • Economic significance and calculation of the profitability of district CHP plant
Literature

Bezüglich des Themenbereichs "Kraft-Wärme-Kopplung":

  • W. Piller, M. Rudolph: Kraft-Wärme-Kopplung, VWEW Verlag
  • Kehlhofer, Kunze, Lehmann, Schüller: Handbuch Energie, Band 7, Technischer Verlag Resch
  • W. Suttor: Praxis Kraft-Wärme-Kopplung, C.F. Müller Verlag
  • K.W. Schmitz, G. Koch: Kraft-Wärme-Kopplung, VDI Verlag
  • K.-H. Suttor, W. Suttor: Die KWK Fibel, Resch Verlag

und für die Grundlagen der "Verbrennungstechnik":

  • J. Warnatz, U. Maas, R.W. Dibble; Technische Verbrennung: physikalisch-chemische Grundlagen, Modellbildung, Schadstoffentstehung. Springer, Berlin [u. a.], 2001



Course L0220: Combined Heat and Power and Combustion Technology
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Dr. Kristin Abel-Günther
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0801: Water Resources and -Supply

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Chemistry of Drinking Water Treatment (L0311) Lecture 2 1
Chemistry of Drinking Water Treatment (L0312) Recitation Section (large) 1 2
Water Resource Management (L0402) Lecture 2 2
Water Resource Management (L0403) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Mathias Ernst
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Knowledge of water management and the key processes involved in water treatment.

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students will be able to outline key areas of conflict in water management, as well as their mutual dependence for sustainable water supply. They will understand relevant economic, environmental and social factors. Students will be able to explain and outline the organisational structures of water companies. They will be able to explain the available water treatment processes and the scope of their application.

Skills

Students will be able to assess complex problems in drinking water production and establish solutions involving water management and technical measures. They will be able to assess the evaluation methods that can be used for this. Students will be able to carry out chemical calculations for selected treatment processes and apply generally accepted technical rules and standards to these processes.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Working in a diverse group of specialists, students will be able to develop and document complex solutions for the management and treatment of drinking water. They will be able to take an appropriate professional position, for example representing user interests. They will be able to develop joint solutions in teams of diverse experts and present these solutions to others.

Autonomy

Students will be in a position to work on a subject independently and present on this subject.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 60 min (chemistry) + presentation
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Structural Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Geotechnical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Water and Traffic: Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Water: Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Environment: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Cities: Elective Compulsory
Course L0311: Chemistry of Drinking Water Treatment
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 2, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Klaus Johannsen
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

The topic of this course is water chemistry with respect to drinking water treatment and water distribution

Major topics are solubility of gases, carbonic acid system and calcium carbonate,  blending, softening, redox processes, materials and legal requirements on drinking water treatment. Focus is put on generally accepted rules of technology (DVGW- and DIN-standards).

Special emphasis is put on calculations using realistic analysis data  (e.g. calculation of pH or calcium carbonate dissolution potential) in exercises. Students can get a feedback and gain extra points for exam by solving problems for homework.

Knowledge of drinking water treatment processes is vital for this lecture. Therefore the most important processes are explained coordinated with the course “ Water resources management“ in the beginning of the semester.


Literature

MHW (rev. by Crittenden, J. et al.): Water treatment principles and design. John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, 2005.

Stumm, W., Morgan, J.J.: Aquatic chemistry. John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1996.

DVGW (Hrsg.): Wasseraufbereitung - Grundlagen und Verfahren. Oldenbourg Industrie Verlag, München, 2004.

Jensen, J. N.: A Problem Solving Approach to Aquatic Chemistry. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 2003.


Course L0312: Chemistry of Drinking Water Treatment
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Dr. Klaus Johannsen
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L0402: Water Resource Management
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Mathias Ernst
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

The lecture provides comprehensive knowledge on interaction of water ressource management and drinking water supply. Content overview:

  • Current situation of global water resources

-        User and Stakeholder conflicts

-        Wasserressourcenmanagement in urbane Gebieten

-        Rechtliche Aspekte, Organisationsformen Trinkwasserversorgungsunternehmen.

-        Ökobilanzierung, Benchmarking in der Wasserversorgung

Literature
  • Aktuelle UN World Water Development Reports
  • Branchenbild der deutschen Wasserwirtschaft, VKU (2011)
  • Aktuelle Artikel wissenschaftlicher Zeitschriften
  • Ppt der Vorlesung
Course L0403: Water Resource Management
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Mathias Ernst
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0902: Wastewater Treatment and Air Pollution Abatement

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Biological Wastewater Treatment (L0517) Lecture 2 3
Air Pollution Abatement (L0203) Lecture 2 3
Module Responsible Dr. Swantje Pietsch-Braune
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge of biology and chemistry

Basic knowledge of solids process engineering and separation technology


Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

After successful completion of the module students are able to

  • name and explain biological processes for waste water treatment,
  • characterize waste water and sewage sludge,
  • discuss legal regulations in the area of emissions and air quality
  • explain the effects of air pollutants on the environment,
  • name and explan off gas tretament processes and to define their area of application
Skills

Students are able to

  • choose and design processs steps for the biological waste water treatment
  • combine processes for cleaning of off-gases depending on the pollutants contained in the gases
Personal Competence
Social Competence
Autonomy
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Water and Traffic: Elective Compulsory
Bioprocess Engineering: Specialisation A - General Bioprocess Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering: Specialisation General Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Waste and Energy: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Joint European Master in Environmental Studies - Cities and Sustainability: Specialisation Water: Elective Compulsory
Renewable Energies: Specialisation Bioenergy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Process Engineering: Specialisation Environmental Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Process Engineering: Specialisation Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Water: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Environment: Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Cities: Compulsory
Course L0517: Biological Wastewater Treatment
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Joachim Behrendt
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

Charaterisation of Wastewater
Metobolism of Microorganisms
Kinetic of mirobiotic processes
Calculation of bioreactor for wastewater treatment
Concepts of Wastewater treatment
Design of WWTP
Excursion to a WWTP
Biofilms
Biofim Reactors
Anaerobic Wastewater and sldge treatment
resources oriented sanitation technology
Future challenges of wastewater treatment

Literature

Gujer, Willi
Siedlungswasserwirtschaft : mit 84 Tabellen
ISBN: 3540343296 (Gb.) URL: http://www.gbv.de/dms/bs/toc/516261924.pdf URL: http://deposit.d-nb.de/cgi-bin/dokserv?id=2842122&prov=M&dok_var=1&dok_ext=htm
Berlin [u.a.] : Springer, 2007
TUB_HH_Katalog
Henze, Mogens
Wastewater treatment : biological and chemical processes
ISBN: 3540422285 (Pp.)
Berlin [u.a.] : Springer, 2002
TUB_HH_Katalog
Imhoff, Karl (Imhoff, Klaus R.;)
Taschenbuch der Stadtentwässerung : mit 10 Tafeln
ISBN: 3486263331 ((Gb.))
München [u.a.] : Oldenbourg, 1999
TUB_HH_Katalog
Lange, Jörg (Otterpohl, Ralf; Steger-Hartmann, Thomas;)
Abwasser : Handbuch zu einer zukunftsfähigen Wasserwirtschaft
ISBN: 3980350215 (kart.) URL: http://www.gbv.de/du/services/agi/52567E5D44DA0809C12570220050BF25/000000700334
Donaueschingen-Pfohren : Mall-Beton-Verl., 2000
TUB_HH_Katalog
Mudrack, Klaus (Kunst, Sabine;)
Biologie der Abwasserreinigung : 18 Tabellen
ISBN: 382741427X URL: http://www.gbv.de/du/services/agi/94B581161B6EC747C1256E3F005A8143/420000114903
Heidelberg [u.a.] : Spektrum, Akad. Verl., 2003
TUB_HH_Katalog
Tchobanoglous, George (Metcalf & Eddy, Inc., ;)
Wastewater engineering : treatment and reuse
ISBN: 0070418780 (alk. paper) ISBN: 0071122508 (ISE (*pbk))
Boston [u.a.] : McGraw-Hill, 2003
TUB_HH_Katalog
Henze, Mogens
Activated sludge models ASM1, ASM2, ASM2d and ASM3
ISBN: 1900222248
London : IWA Publ., 2002
TUB_HH_Katalog
Kunz, Peter
Umwelt-Bioverfahrenstechnik
Vieweg, 1992
Bauhaus-Universität., Arbeitsgruppe Weiterbildendes Studium Wasser und Umwelt (Deutsche Vereinigung für Wasserwirtschaft, Abwasser und Abfall, ;)
Abwasserbehandlung : Gewässerbelastung, Bemessungsgrundlagen, Mechanische Verfahren, Biologische Verfahren, Reststoffe aus der Abwasserbehandlung, Kleinkläranlagen
ISBN: 3860682725 URL: http://www.gbv.de/dms/weimar/toc/513989765_toc.pdf URL: http://www.gbv.de/dms/weimar/abs/513989765_abs.pdf
Weimar : Universitätsverl, 2006
TUB_HH_Katalog
Deutsche Vereinigung für Wasserwirtschaft, Abwasser und Abfall
DWA-Regelwerk
Hennef : DWA, 2004
TUB_HH_Katalog
Wiesmann, Udo (Choi, In Su; Dombrowski, Eva-Maria;)
Fundamentals of biological wastewater treatment
ISBN: 3527312196 (Gb.) URL: http://deposit.ddb.de/cgi-bin/dokserv?id=2774611&prov=M&dok_var=1&dok_ext=htm
Weinheim : WILEY-VCH, 2007
TUB_HH_Katalog

Course L0203: Air Pollution Abatement
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Swantje Pietsch-Braune, Christian Eichler
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

In the lecture methods for the reduction of emissions from industrial plants are treated. At the beginning a short survey of the different forms of air pollutants is given. In the second part physical principals for the removal of particulate and gaseous pollutants form flue gases are treated. Industrial applications of these principles are demonstrated with examples showing the removal of specific compounds, e.g. sulfur or mercury from flue gases of incinerators.

Literature

Handbook of air pollution prevention and control, Nicholas P. Cheremisinoff. - Amsterdam [u.a.] : Butterworth-Heinemann, 2002
Atmospheric pollution : history, science, and regulation, Mark Zachary Jacobson. - Cambridge [u.a.] : Cambridge Univ. Press, 2002
Air pollution control technology handbook, Karl B. Schnelle. - Boca Raton [u.a.] : CRC Press, c 2002
Air pollution, Jeremy Colls. - 2. ed. - London [u.a.] : Spon, 2002

Module M0949: Rural Development and Resources Oriented Sanitation for different Climate Zones

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Rural Development and Resources Oriented Sanitation for different Climate Zones (L0942) Seminar 2 3
Rural Development and Resources Oriented Sanitation for different Climate Zones (L0941) Lecture 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Ralf Otterpohl
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge of the global situation with rising poverty, soil degradation, lack of water resources and sanitation

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students can describe resources oriented wastewater systems mainly based on source control in detail. They can comment on techniques designed for reuse of water, nutrients and soil conditioners.

Students are able to discuss a wide range of proven approaches in Rural Development from and for many regions of the world.


Skills

Students are able to design low-tech/low-cost sanitation, rural water supply, rainwater harvesting systems, measures for the rehabilitation of top soil quality combined with food and water security. Students can consult on the basics of soil building through “Holisitc Planned Grazing” as developed by Allan Savory.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to develop a specific topic in a team and to work out milestones according to a given plan.

Autonomy

Students are in a position to work on a subject and to organize their work flow independently. They can also present on this subject.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Subject theoretical and practical work
Examination duration and scale During the course of the semester, the students work towards mile stones. The work includes presentations and papers. Detailed information will be provided at the beginning of the smester.
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Water and Traffic: Elective Compulsory
Bioprocess Engineering: Specialisation A - General Bioprocess Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering: Specialisation General Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Water: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Joint European Master in Environmental Studies - Cities and Sustainability: Specialisation Water: Elective Compulsory
Process Engineering: Specialisation Environmental Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Process Engineering: Specialisation Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Water: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Environment: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Cities: Elective Compulsory
Course L0942: Rural Development and Resources Oriented Sanitation for different Climate Zones
Typ Seminar
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Ralf Otterpohl
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content


  • Central part of this module is a group work on a subtopic of the lectures. The focus of these projects will be based on an interview with a target audience, practitioners or scientists.
  • The group work is divided into several Milestones and Assignments. The outcome will be presented in a final presentation at the end of the semester.



Literature
  • J. Lange, R. Otterpohl 2000: Abwasser - Handbuch zu einer zukunftsfähigen Abwasserwirtschaft. Mallbeton Verlag (TUHH Bibliothek)
  • Winblad, Uno and Simpson-Hébert, Mayling 2004: Ecological Sanitation, EcoSanRes, Sweden (free download)
  • Schober, Sabine: WTO/TUHH Award winning Terra Preta Toilet Design: http://youtu.be/w_R09cYq6ys
Course L0941: Rural Development and Resources Oriented Sanitation for different Climate Zones
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Ralf Otterpohl
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Living Soil - THE key element of Rural Development
  • Participatory Approaches
  • Rainwater Harvesting
  • Ecological Sanitation Principles and practical examples
  • Permaculture Principles of Rural Development
  • Performance and Resilience of Organic Small Farms
  • Going Further: The TUHH Toolbox for Rural Development
  • EMAS Technologies, Low cost drinking water supply


Literature
  • Miracle Water Village, India, Integrated Rainwater Harvesting, Water Efficiency, Reforestation and Sanitation: http://youtu.be/9hmkgn0nBgk
  • Montgomery, David R. 2007: Dirt: The Erosion of Civilizations, University of California Press

Module M0540: Transport Processes

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Multiphase Flows (L0104) Lecture 2 2
Reactor Design Using Local Transport Processes (L0105) Project-/problem-based Learning 2 2
Heat & Mass Transfer in Process Engineering (L0103) Lecture 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Michael Schlüter
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge All lectures from the undergraduate studies, especially mathematics, chemistry, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, heat- and mass transfer.
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students are able to:

  • describe transport processes in single- and multiphase flows and they know the analogy between heat- and mass transfer as well as the limits of this analogy.
  • explain the main transport laws and their application as well as the limits of application.
  • describe how transport coefficients for heat- and mass transfer can be derived experimentally.
  • compare different multiphase reactors like trickle bed reactors, pipe reactors, stirring tanks and bubble column reactors.
  • are known. The Students are able to perform mass and energy balances for different kind of reactors. Further more the industrial application of multiphase reactors for heat- and mass transfer are known.
Skills

The students are able to:

  • optimize multiphase reactors by using mass- and energy balances,
  • use transport processes for the design of technical processes,
  • to choose a multiphase reactor for a specific application.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to discuss in international teams in english and develop an approach under pressure of time.

Autonomy

Students are able to define independently tasks, to solve the problem "design of a multiphase reactor". The knowledge that s necessary is worked out by the students themselves on the basis of the existing knowledge from the lecture. The students are able to decide by themselves what kind of equation and model is applicable to their certain problem. They are able to organize their own team and to define priorities for different tasks.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 15 min Presentation + 90 min multiple choice written examen
Assignment for the Following Curricula Bioprocess Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Energy and Environmental Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Process Engineering and Biotechnology: Elective Compulsory
Renewable Energies: Specialisation Solar Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Process Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Course L0104: Multiphase Flows
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Michael Schlüter
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Interfaces in MPF (boundary layers, surfactants)
  • Hydrodynamics & pressure drop in Film Flows
  • Hydrodynamics & pressure drop in Gas-Liquid Pipe Flows
  • Hydrodynamics & pressure drop in Bubbly Flows
  • Mass Transfer in Film Flows
  • Mass Transfer in Gas-Liquid Pipe Flows
  • Mass Transfer in Bubbly Flows
  • Reactive mass Transfer in Multiphase Flows
  • Film Flow: Application Trickle Bed Reactors
  • Pipe Flow: Application Turbular Reactors
  • Bubbly Flow: Application Bubble Column Reactors
Literature

Brauer, H.: Grundlagen der Einphasen- und Mehrphasenströmungen. Verlag Sauerländer, Aarau, Frankfurt (M), 1971.
Clift, R.; Grace, J.R.; Weber, M.E.: Bubbles, Drops and Particles, Academic Press, New York, 1978.
Fan, L.-S.; Tsuchiya, K.: Bubble Wake Dynamics in Liquids and Liquid-Solid Suspensions, Butterworth-Heinemann Series in Chemical Engineering, Boston, USA, 1990.
Hewitt, G.F.; Delhaye, J.M.; Zuber, N. (Ed.): Multiphase Science and Technology. Hemisphere Publishing Corp, Vol. 1/1982 bis Vol. 6/1992.
Kolev, N.I.: Multiphase flow dynamics. Springer, Vol. 1 and 2, 2002.
Levy, S.: Two-Phase Flow in Complex Systems. Verlag John Wiley & Sons, Inc, 1999.
Crowe, C.T.: Multiphase Flows with Droplets and Particles. CRC Press, Boca Raton, Fla, 1998.

Course L0105: Reactor Design Using Local Transport Processes
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Michael Schlüter
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

In this Problem-Based Learning unit the students have to design a multiphase reactor for a fast chemical reaction concerning optimal hydrodynamic conditions of the multiphase flow. 

The four students in each team have to:

  • collect and discuss material properties and equations for design from the literature,
  • calculate the optimal hydrodynamic design,
  • check the plausibility of the results critically,
  • write an exposé with the results.

This exposé will be used as basis for the discussion within the oral group examen of each team.

Literature see actual literature list in StudIP with recent published papers
Course L0103: Heat & Mass Transfer in Process Engineering
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Michael Schlüter
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Introduction - Transport Processes in Chemical Engineering
  • Molecular Heat- and Mass Transfer: Applications of Fourier's and Fick's Law
  • Convective Heat and Mass Transfer: Applications in Process Engineering
  • Unsteady State Transport Processes: Cooling & Drying
  • Transport at fluidic Interfaces: Two Film, Penetration, Surface Renewal
  • Transport Laws & Balance Equations  with turbulence, sinks and sources
  • Experimental Determination of Transport Coefficients
  • Design and Scale Up of Reactors for Heat- and Mass Transfer
  • Reactive Mass Transfer 
  • Processes with Phase Changes – Evaporization and Condensation 
  • Radiative Heat Transfer - Fundamentals
  • Radiative Heat Transfer - Solar Energy

Literature
  1. Baehr, Stephan: Heat and Mass Transfer, Wiley 2002.
  2. Bird, Stewart, Lightfood: Transport Phenomena, Springer, 2000.
  3. John H. Lienhard: A Heat Transfer Textbook,  Phlogiston Press, Cambridge Massachusetts, 2008.
  4. Myers: Analytical Methods in Conduction Heat Transfer, McGraw-Hill, 1971.
  5. Incropera, De Witt: Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer, Wiley, 2002.
  6. Beek, Muttzall: Transport Phenomena, Wiley, 1983.
  7. Crank: The Mathematics of Diffusion, Oxford, 1995. 
  8. Madhusudana: Thermal Contact Conductance, Springer, 1996.
  9. Treybal: Mass-Transfer-Operation, McGraw-Hill, 1987.




Module M1125: Bioresources and Biorefineries

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Biorefinery Technology (L0895) Lecture 2 2
Biorefinery Technologie (L0974) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Bioresource Management (L0892) Lecture 2 2
Bioresource Management (L0893) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Module Responsible Dr. Ina Körner
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basics on engineering;
Basics of waste and energy management

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students can give on overview on principles and theories in the field’s bioresource management and biorefinery technology and can explain specialized terms and technologies.

Skills

Students are capable of applying knowledge and know-how in the field’s bioresource management and biorefinery technology
in order to perform technical and regional-planning tasks.  They are also able to discuss the links to waste management, energy management and biotechnology.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students can work goal-oriented with others and communicate and document their interests and knowledge in acceptable way.

Autonomy

Students are able to solve independently, with the aid of pointers, practice-related tasks bearing in mind possible societal consequences.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering: Specialisation Bioprocess Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Waste and Energy: Elective Compulsory
Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Biotechnology: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Joint European Master in Environmental Studies - Cities and Sustainability: Specialisation Energy: Elective Compulsory
Course L0895: Biorefinery Technology
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Ina Körner
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

The Europe 2020 strategy calls for bioeconomy as the key for smart and green growth of today. Biorefineries are the fundamental part on the way to convert the use of fossil-based society to bio-based society. For this reason, agriculture and forestry sectors are increasingly deliver bioresources. It is not only for their traditional applications in the food and feed sectors such as pulp or paper and construction material productions, but also to produce bioenergy and bio-based products such as bio-plastics. However although bioresources are renewable, they are considered as limited resources as well. The bioeconomy’s limitation factor is the availability land on our world. In the context of the development of the bioeconomy, the sustainable and reliable supply of noon-food biomass feedstock is a critical success factor for the long-term perspective of bioenergy and other bio-based products production. Biorefineries are complex of technologies and process cascades using the available primary, secondary and tertiary bioresources to produce a multitude of products - a product mix from material and energy products.

The lecture gives an overview on biorefinery technology and shall contribute to promotion of international biorefinery developments.

Lectures:

  • What is a biorefinery: Overview on basic organic substrates and processes which lead to material and energy products
  • The way from a fossil based to a biobased economy in the 21st century
  • The worlds most advanced biorefinery
  • Presentation of various biorefinery systems and their products (e.g. lignocellulose biorefinery, green biorefinery, whole plant biorefinery, civilization biorefinery)
  • Example projects (e.g. combination of anaerobic digestion and composting in practice; demonstration project in Hamburgs city quarter Jenfelder Au)

The lectures will be accompanied by technical tours. Optional it is also possible to visit more biorefinery lectures in the University of Hamburg (lectures in German only).

In the exercise students have the possibility to work in groups on a biorefinery project or to work on a student-specific task.

Literature

Biorefineries - Industrial Process and Products - Status Qua and Future directions by Kamm, Gruber and Kamm (2010); Wiley VCH, available on-line in TUHH-library

Powerpoint-Präsentations / selected Publications / further recommendations depending on the actual developments

Industrial Biorefineries and White Biorefinery, by Pandey, Höfer, Larroche, Taherzadeh, Nampoothiri (Eds.); (2014 book development in progress)

Course L0974: Biorefinery Technologie
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Dr. Ina Körner
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

1. ) Selection of a topic within the thematic area  "Biorefinery Technologie" from a given list or self-selected.

2.) Self-dependent recherches to the topic.

3.) Preparation of a written elaboration.

4.) Presentation of the results in the group.
Literature

Vom Thema abhängig. Eigene Recherchen nötig.

Depending on the topic. Own recheches necassary.

Course L0892: Bioresource Management
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Ina Körner
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

In the context of limited fossil resources, climate change mitigation and increasing population growth, Bioresources has a special role. They have to feed the population and in the same time they are important for material production such as pulp and paper or construction materials. Moreover they become more and more important in chemical industry and in energy provision as fossil substitution. Although Bioresources are renewable, they are also considered as limited resources.   The availability of land on our planet is the main limitation factor. The sustainable and reliable supply of non-food biomass feedstock is a critical for successful and long term perspective on production of bioenergy and other bio-based products. As the consequence, the increasing competition and shortages continue to happen at the traditional sectors.  On the other side, huge unused but potentials residue on waste and wastewater sector exist.  Nowadays, a lot of activities to develop better processes, to create new bio-based products in order to become more efficient, the inclusion of secondary and tertiary bio-resources in the valorisation chain are going on.

The lecture deals with the current state-of-the-art of bioresource management. It shows deficits and potentials for improvement especially in the sector of utilization of organic residues for material and energy generation:

Lectures on:

  • Bioresource generation and utilization including lost potentials today
  • Basic biological, mechanical, physico-chemical and logistical processes
  • The conflict of material vs. energy generation from wood / waste wood
  • The basics of pulp & paper production including waste paper recycling
  • The Pros and Cons from biogas and compost production

Special lectures by invited guests from research and practice:

  • Pathways of waste organics on the example of Hamburg`s City Cleaning Company
  • Utilization options of landscaping materials on the example of grass
  • Increase of process efficiency of anaerobic digestions
  • Decision support tools on the example of an municipality in Indonesia

Optional: Technical visits

Literature

Power-Point presentations in STUD-IP

Course L0893: Bioresource Management
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Dr. Ina Körner
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0542: Fluid Mechanics in Process Engineering

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Applications of Fluid Mechanics in Process Engineering (L0106) Recitation Section (large) 2 2
Fluid Mechanics II (L0001) Lecture 2 4
Module Responsible Prof. Michael Schlüter
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Mathematics I-III
  • Fundamentals in Fluid Mechanics
  • Technical Thermodynamics I-II
  • Heat- and Mass Transfer
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students are able to describe different applications of fluid mechanics in Process Engineering, Bioprocess Engineering, Energy- and Environmental Process Engineering and Renewable Energies. They are able to use the fundamentals of fluid mechanics for calculations of certain engineering problems. The students are able to estimate if a problem can be solved with an analytical solution and what kind of alternative possibilities are available (e.g. self-similarity in an example of free jets, empirical solutions in an example with the Forchheimer equation, numerical methods in an example of Large Eddy Simulation.

Skills

Students are able to use the governing equations of Fluid Dynamics for the design of technical processes. Especially they are able to formulate momentum and mass balances to optimize the hydrodynamics of technical processes. They are able to transform a verbal formulated message into an abstract formal procedure.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to discuss a given problem in small groups and to develop an approach.

Autonomy

Students are able to define independently tasks for problems related to fluid mechanics. They are able to work out the knowledge that is necessary to solve the problem by themselves on the basis of the existing knowledge from the lecture.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 180 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Bioprocess Engineering: Specialisation A - General Bioprocess Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy and Environmental Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Process Engineering and Biotechnology: Elective Compulsory
Process Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Course L0106: Applications of Fluid Mechanics in Process Engineering
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Michael Schlüter
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content The Exercise-Lecture will bridge the gap between the theoretical content from the lecture and practical calculations. For this aim a special exercise is calculated at the blackboard that shows how the theoretical knowledge from the lecture can be used to solve real problems in Process Engineering.
Literature
  1. Brauer, H.: Grundlagen der Einphasen- und Mehrphasenströmungen. Verlag Sauerländer, Aarau, Frankfurt (M), 1971.
  2. Brauer, H.; Mewes, D.: Stoffaustausch einschließlich chemischer Reaktion. Frankfurt: Sauerländer 1972.
  3. Crowe, C. T.: Engineering fluid mechanics. Wiley, New York, 2009.
  4. Durst, F.: Strömungsmechanik: Einführung in die Theorie der Strömungen von Fluiden. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2006.
  5. Fox, R.W.; et al.: Introduction to Fluid Mechanics. J. Wiley & Sons, 1994.
  6. Herwig, H.: Strömungsmechanik: Eine Einführung in die Physik und die mathematische Modellierung von Strömungen. Springer Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 2006.
  7. Herwig, H.: Strömungsmechanik: Einführung in die Physik von technischen Strömungen: Vieweg+Teubner Verlag / GWV Fachverlage GmbH, Wiesbaden, 2008.
  8. Kuhlmann, H.C.:  Strömungsmechanik. München, Pearson Studium, 2007
  9. Oertl, H.: Strömungsmechanik: Grundlagen, Grundgleichungen, Lösungsmethoden, Softwarebeispiele. Vieweg+ Teubner / GWV Fachverlage GmbH, Wiesbaden, 2009.
  10. Schade, H.; Kunz, E.: Strömungslehre. Verlag de Gruyter, Berlin, New York, 2007.
  11. Truckenbrodt, E.: Fluidmechanik 1: Grundlagen und elementare Strömungsvorgänge dichtebeständiger Fluide. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2008.
  12. Schlichting, H. : Grenzschicht-Theorie. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2006.
  13. van Dyke, M.: An Album of Fluid Motion. The Parabolic Press, Stanford California, 1882.  
  14. White, F.: Fluid Mechanics, Mcgraw-Hill, ISBN-10: 0071311211, ISBN-13: 978-0071311212, 2011.
Course L0001: Fluid Mechanics II
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 92, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Michael Schlüter
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Differential equations for momentum-, heat and mass transfer   
  • Examples for simplifications of the Navier-Stokes Equations 
  • Unsteady momentum transfer
  • Free shear layer, turbulence and free jets
  • Flow around particles - Solids Process Engineering
  • Coupling of momentum and heat transfer - Thermal Process Engineering
  • Rheology – Bioprocess Engineering
  • Coupling of momentum- and mass transfer – Reactive mixing, Chemical Process Engineering 
  • Flow threw porous structures - heterogeneous catalysis
  • Pumps and turbines - Energy- and Environmental Process Engineering 
  • Wind- and Wave-Turbines - Renewable Energy
  • Introduction into Computational Fluid Dynamics

Literature
  1. Brauer, H.: Grundlagen der Einphasen- und Mehrphasenströmungen. Verlag Sauerländer, Aarau, Frankfurt (M), 1971.
  2. Brauer, H.; Mewes, D.: Stoffaustausch einschließlich chemischer Reaktion. Frankfurt: Sauerländer 1972.
  3. Crowe, C. T.: Engineering fluid mechanics. Wiley, New York, 2009.
  4. Durst, F.: Strömungsmechanik: Einführung in die Theorie der Strömungen von Fluiden. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2006.
  5. Fox, R.W.; et al.: Introduction to Fluid Mechanics. J. Wiley & Sons, 1994.
  6. Herwig, H.: Strömungsmechanik: Eine Einführung in die Physik und die mathematische Modellierung von Strömungen. Springer Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 2006.
  7. Herwig, H.: Strömungsmechanik: Einführung in die Physik von technischen Strömungen: Vieweg+Teubner Verlag / GWV Fachverlage GmbH, Wiesbaden, 2008.
  8. Kuhlmann, H.C.:  Strömungsmechanik. München, Pearson Studium, 2007
  9. Oertl, H.: Strömungsmechanik: Grundlagen, Grundgleichungen, Lösungsmethoden, Softwarebeispiele. Vieweg+ Teubner / GWV Fachverlage GmbH, Wiesbaden, 2009.
  10. Schade, H.; Kunz, E.: Strömungslehre. Verlag de Gruyter, Berlin, New York, 2007.
  11. Truckenbrodt, E.: Fluidmechanik 1: Grundlagen und elementare Strömungsvorgänge dichtebeständiger Fluide. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2008.
  12. Schlichting, H. : Grenzschicht-Theorie. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2006.
  13. van Dyke, M.: An Album of Fluid Motion. The Parabolic Press, Stanford California, 1882.  

Module M0619: Waste Treatment Technologies

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Waste and Environmental Chemistry (L0328) Practical Course 2 2
Biological Waste Treatment (L0318) Project-/problem-based Learning 3 4
Module Responsible Prof. Kerstin Kuchta
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge chemical and biological basics
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The module aims possess knowledge concerning the planning of biological waste treatment plants. Students are able to explain the design and layout of anaerobic and aerobic waste treatment plants in detail, describe different techniques for waste gas treatment plants for biological waste treatment plants and explain different methods for waste analytics.


Skills

The students are able to discuss the compilation of design and layout of plants. They can critically evaluate techniques and quality control measurements. The students can recherché and evaluate literature and date connected to the tasks given in der module and plan additional tests. They are capable of reflecting and evaluating findings in the group.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students can participate in subject-specific and interdisciplinary discussions, develop cooperated solutions and defend their own work results in front of others and promote the scientific development in front of colleagues. Furthermore, they can give and accept professional constructive criticism.


Autonomy

Students can independently tap knowledge from literature, business or test reports and transform it to the course projects. They are capable, in consultation with supervisors as well as in the interim presentation, to assess their learning level and define further steps on this basis. Furthermore, they can define targets for new application-or research-oriented duties in accordance with the potential social, economic and cultural impact.


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes None Subject theoretical and practical work
Examination Presentation
Examination duration and scale Elaboration and Presentation (15-25 minutes in groups)
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Structural Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Geotechnical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Water and Traffic: Elective Compulsory
Energy and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Environmental Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Joint European Master in Environmental Studies - Cities and Sustainability: Specialisation Energy: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Cities: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Environment: Elective Compulsory
Course L0328: Waste and Environmental Chemistry
Typ Practical Course
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Kerstin Kuchta
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

The participants are divided into groups. Each group prepares a transcript on the experiment performed, which is then used as basis for discussing the results and to evaluate the performance of the group and the individual student.

In some experiments the test procedure and the results are presented in seminar form, accompanied by discussion and results evaluation.

Experiments ar e.g.

Screening  and particle size determination

Fos/Tac

AAS

Chalorific value

Literature Scripte
Course L0318: Biological Waste Treatment
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Kerstin Kuchta
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
  1. Introduction
  2. biological basics
  3. determination process specific material characterization
  4. aerobic degradation ( Composting, stabilization)
  5. anaerobic degradation (Biogas production, fermentation)
  6. Technical layout and process design
  7. Flue gas treatment
  8. Plant design practical phase
Literature

Module M0742: Thermal Energy Systems

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Thermal Engergy Systems (L0023) Lecture 3 5
Thermal Engergy Systems (L0024) Recitation Section (large) 1 1
Module Responsible NN
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Technical Thermodynamics I, II, Fluid Dynamics, Heat Transfer
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students know the different energy conversion stages and the difference between efficiency and annual efficiency. They have increased knowledge in heat and mass transfer, especially in regard to buildings and mobile applications. They are familiar with German energy saving code and other technical relevant rules. They know to differ different heating systems in the domestic and industrial area and how to control such heating systems. They are able to model a furnace and to calculate the transient temperatures in a furnace. They have the basic knowledge of emission formations in the flames of small burners  and how to conduct the flue gases into the atmosphere. They are able to model thermodynamic systems with object oriented languages.


Skills

Students are able to calculate the heating demand for different heating systems and to choose the suitable components. They are able to calculate a pipeline network and have the ability to perform simple planning tasks, regarding solar energy. They can write Modelica programs and can transfer research knowledge into practice. They are able to perform scientific work in the field of thermal engineering.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to discuss in small groups and develop an approach.

Autonomy

Students are able to define independently tasks, to get new knowledge from existing knowledge as well as to find ways to use the knowledge in practice.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Bioprocess Engineering: Specialisation A - General Bioprocess Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Energy Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy Systems: Specialisation Energy Systems: Compulsory
Energy Systems: Specialisation Marine Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Renewable Energies: Core qualification: Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Process Engineering: Specialisation Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L0023: Thermal Engergy Systems
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 5
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 108, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer NN
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

1. Introduction

2. Fundamentals of Thermal Engineering 2.1 Heat Conduction 2.2 Convection 2.3 Radiation 2.4 Heat transition 2.5 Combustion parameters 2.6 Electrical heating 2.7 Water vapor transport

3. Heating Systems 3.1 Warm water heating systems 3.2 Warm water supply 3.3 piping calculation 3.4 boilers, heat pumps, solar collectors 3.5 Air heating systems 3.6 radiative heating systems

4. Thermal traetment systems 4.1 Industrial furnaces 4.2 Melting furnaces 4.3 Drying plants 4.4 Emission control 4.5 Chimney calculation 4.6 Energy measuring

5. Laws and standards 5.1 Buildings 5.2 Industrial plants

Literature
  • Schmitz, G.: Klimaanlagen, Skript zur Vorlesung
  • VDI Wärmeatlas, 11. Auflage, Springer Verlag, Düsseldorf 2013
  • Herwig, H.; Moschallski, A.: Wärmeübertragung, Vieweg+Teubner Verlag, Wiesbaden 2009
  • Recknagel, H.;  Sprenger, E.; Schrammek, E.-R.: Taschenbuch für Heizung- und Klimatechnik 2013/2014, 76. Auflage, Deutscher Industrieverlag, 2013
Course L0024: Thermal Engergy Systems
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer NN
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1037: Steam Turbines in Energy, Environmental and Power Train Engineering

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Steam turbines in energy, environmental and Power Train Engineering (L1286) Lecture 3 5
Steam turbines in energy, environmental and Power Train Engineering (L1287) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Module Responsible Dr. Christian Scharfetter
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge


  • "Gas and Steam Power Plants"
  • "Technical Thermodynamics I & II"
  • "Fluid Mechanics"


Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

After successful completion of the module the students must be in a position to:

  • name and identify the various parts and constructive groups of steam turbines
  • describe and explain the key operating conditions for the application of steam turbines
  • classify different construction types and differentiate among steam turbines according to size and operating ranges
  • describe the thermodynamic processes and the constructive and operational repercussions resulting from the latter
  • calculate thermodynamically a turbine stage and a stage assembly
  • calculate or estimate and further evaluate sections of the turbine
  • outline diagrams describing the operating range and the constructive characteristics
  • investigate the constructive aspects and develop from the thermodynamic requirements the required construction characteristics
  • discuss and argue on the operation characteristics of different turbine types
  • evaluate thermodynamically the integration of different turbine designs in heat cycles.
Skills

In the module the students learn the fundamental approaches and methods for the design and operational evaluation of complex plant, and gain in particular confidence in seeking optimisations. They specifically:

  • obtain the ability to analyse the potential of various energy sources that can be utilised thermodynamically, from the energetic-economic and technical viewpoints
  • can evaluate the performance and technical limitations in using various energy sources, for supplying base load and balancing reserve power to the electricity grid
  • on the basis of the impact of power plant operation on the integrity of components, can describe the precautionary principles for damage prevention
  • can describe the key requirements for the Management and Design of Thermal Power Plants, based on the overriding demands imposed by various legislative frameworks.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

In the module the students learn:

  • to work together with others whilst seeking a solution
  • to assist each other in problem solving
  • to conduct discussions
  • to present work results
  • to work respectfully within the team.


Autonomy

In the module the students learn the independent working of a complex theme whilst considering various aspects. They also learn how to combine independent functions in a system.

The students become the ability to gain independently knowledge and transfer it also to new problem solving.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 180 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Energy and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Energy Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Course L1286: Steam turbines in energy, environmental and Power Train Engineering
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 5
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 108, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Dr. Christian Scharfetter
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Introduction
  • Construction Aspects of a Steam Turbine 
  • Energy Conversion in a Steam Turbine  
  • Construction Types of Steam Turbines 
  • Behaviour of Steam Turbines 
  • Sealing Systems for Steam Turbines 
  • Axial Thrust 
  • Regulation of Steam Turbines
  • Stiffness Calculation of the Blades
  • Blade and Rotor Oscillations 
  • Fundamentals of a Safe Steam Turbine Operation
  • Application in Conventional and Renewable Power Stations
  • Connection to thermal and electrical energy networks, interfaces
  • Conventional and regenerative power plant concepts, drive technology
  • Analysis of the global energy supply market
  • Applications in conventional and regenerative power plants
  • Different power plant concepts and their influence on the steam turbine (engine and gas turbine power plants with waste heat utilization, geothermal energy, solar thermal energy, biomass, biogas, waste incineration).
  • Classic combined heat and power generation as a combined product of the manufacturing industry
  • Impact of change in the energy market, operating profiles
  • Applications in drive technology
  • Operating and maintenance concepts

    The lecture will be deepened by means of examples, tasks and two excursions
Literature
  • Traupel, W.: Thermische Turbomaschinen. Berlin u. a., Springer (TUB HH: Signatur MSI-105) 
  • Menny, K.: Strömungsmaschinen: hydraulische und thermische Kraft- und Arbeitsmaschinen. Ausgabe: 5. Wiesbaden, Teubner, 2006 (TUB HH: Signatur MSI-121)
  • Bohl, W.: Aufbau und Wirkungsweise. Ausgabe 6. Würzburg, Vogel, 1994 (TUB HH: Signatur MSI-109)
  • Bohl, W.: Berechnung und Konstruktion. Ausgabe 6. Aufl. Würzburg, Vogel, 1999 (TUB HH: Signatur MSI-110)


Course L1287: Steam turbines in energy, environmental and Power Train Engineering
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Dr. Christian Scharfetter
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Specialization II. Information Technology

Module M0837: Simulation of Communication Networks

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Simulation of Communication Networks (L0887) Project-/problem-based Learning 5 6
Module Responsible Prof. Andreas Timm-Giel
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Knowledge of computer and communication networks
  • Basic programming skills
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students are able to explain the necessary stochastics, the discrete event simulation technology and modelling of networks for performance evaluation.

Skills

Students are able to apply the method of simulation for performance evaluation to different, also not practiced, problems of communication networks. The students can analyse the obtained results and explain the effects observed in the network. They are able to question their own results.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to acquire expert knowledge in groups, present the results, and discuss solution approaches and results. They are able to work out solutions for new problems in small teams.

Autonomy

Students are able to transfer independently and in discussion with others the acquired method and expert knowledge to new problems. They can identify missing knowledge and acquire this knowledge independently.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Oral exam
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Information and Communication Systems: Elective Compulsory
Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Information and Communication Systems: Specialisation Communication Systems: Elective Compulsory
Information and Communication Systems: Specialisation Secure and Dependable IT Systems, Focus Networks: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Information Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L0887: Simulation of Communication Networks
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 5
CP 6
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Lecturer Prof. Andreas Timm-Giel
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

In the course necessary basic stochastics and the discrete event simulation are introduced. Also simulation models for communication networks, for example, traffic models, mobility models and radio channel models are presented in the lecture. Students work with a simulation tool, where they can directly try out the acquired skills, algorithms and models. At the end of the course increasingly complex networks and protocols are considered and their performance is determined by simulation.

Literature
  • Skript des Instituts für Kommunikationsnetze

Further literature is announced at the beginning of the lecture.

Module M0556: Computer Graphics

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Computer Graphics (L0145) Lecture 2 3
Computer Graphics (L0768) Recitation Section (small) 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Tobias Knopp
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  •  Linear Algebra (in particular matrix/vector computation)
  •  Basic programming skills in C/C++


Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students can explain and describe basic algorithms in 3D computer graphics.


Skills

Students are capable of

  •  implementing a basic 3D rendering pipeline. This consists of projecting simple 3D structures (e.g. cube, spheres) onto a 2D surface using a virtual camera.
  •  apply geometric transformations (e.g. rotation, scaling) in 2D and 3D computer graphics.
  •  using well-known 2D/3D APIs (OpenGL, Cairo) for solving a given problem statement.
Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students can collaborate in a small team on the realization and validation of a 3D computer graphics pipeline.



Autonomy
  •  Students are able to solve simple tasks independently with reference to the contents of the lectures and the exercise sets.
  •  Students are able to solve detailed problems independently with the aid of the tutorial’s programming task.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Computer Science: Specialisation I. Computer and Software Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Information and Communication Systems: Specialisation Communication Systems, Focus Signal Processing: Elective Compulsory
Information and Communication Systems: Specialisation Secure and Dependable IT Systems, Focus Software and Signal Processing: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Information Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L0145: Computer Graphics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Tobias Knopp
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

Computer graphics and animation are leading to an unprecedented visual revolution. The course deals with its technological foundations:

  • Object-oriented Computer Graphics
  • Projections and Transformations
  • Polygonal and Parametric Modelling
  • Illuminating, Shading, Rendering
  • Computer Animation Techniques
  • Kinematics and Dynamics Effects

Students will be be working on a series of mini-projects which will eventually evolve into a final project. Learning computer graphics and animation resembles learning a musical instrument. Therefore, doing your projects well and in time is essential for performing well on this course.

Literature
Alan H. Watt:
3D Computer Graphics.
Harlow: Pearson (3rd ed., repr., 2009).

Dariush Derakhshani:
Introducing Autodesk Maya 2014.
New York, NY : Wiley (2013).

Course L0768: Computer Graphics
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Tobias Knopp
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0627: Machine Learning and Data Mining

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Machine Learning and Data Mining (L0340) Lecture 2 4
Machine Learning and Data Mining (L0510) Recitation Section (small) 2 2
Module Responsible NN
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Calculus
  • Stochastics
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students can explain the difference between instance-based and model-based learning approaches, and they can enumerate basic machine learning technique for each of the two basic approaches, either on the basis of static data, or on the basis of incrementally incoming data . For dealing with uncertainty, students can describe suitable representation formalisms, and they explain how axioms, features, parameters, or structures used in these formalisms can be learned automatically with different algorithms. Students are also able to sketch different clustering techniques. They depict how the performance of learned classifiers can be improved by ensemble learning, and they can summarize how this influences computational learning theory. Algorithms for reinforcement learning can also be explained by students.

Skills

Student derive decision trees and, in turn, propositional rule sets from simple and static data tables and are able to name and explain basic optimization techniques. They present and apply the basic idea of first-order inductive leaning. Students apply the BME, MAP, ML, and EM algorithms for learning parameters of Bayesian networks and compare the different algorithms. They also know how to carry out Gaussian mixture learning. They can contrast kNN classifiers, neural networks, and support vector machines, and name their basic application areas and algorithmic properties. Students can describe basic clustering techniques and explain the basic components of those techniques. Students compare related machine learning techniques, e.g., k-means clustering and nearest neighbor classification. They can distinguish various ensemble learning techniques and compare the different goals of those techniques.




Personal Competence
Social Competence
Autonomy
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula Computer Science: Specialisation II: Intelligence Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Information Technology: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation System Design: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation Intelligent Systems and Robotics: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Robotics and Computer Science: Elective Compulsory
Course L0340: Machine Learning and Data Mining
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 92, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Rainer Marrone
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Decision trees
  • First-order inductive learning
  • Incremental learning: Version spaces
  • Uncertainty
  • Bayesian networks
  • Learning parameters of Bayesian networks
    BME, MAP, ML, EM algorithm
  • Learning structures of Bayesian networks
  • Gaussian Mixture Models
  • kNN classifier, neural network classifier, support vector machine (SVM) classifier
  • Clustering
    Distance measures, k-means clustering, nearest neighbor clustering
  • Kernel Density Estimation
  • Ensemble Learning
  • Reinforcement Learning
  • Computational Learning Theory
Literature
  1. Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach (Third Edition), Stuart Russel, Peter Norvig, Prentice Hall, 2010, Chapters 13, 14, 18-21
  2. Machine Learning: A Probabilistic Perspective, Kevin Murphy, MIT Press 2012
Course L0510: Machine Learning and Data Mining
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Rainer Marrone
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0550: Digital Image Analysis

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Digital Image Analysis (L0126) Lecture 4 6
Module Responsible Prof. Rolf-Rainer Grigat
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

System theory of one-dimensional signals (convolution and correlation, sampling theory, interpolation and decimation, Fourier transform, linear time-invariant systems), linear algebra (Eigenvalue decomposition, SVD), basic stochastics and statistics (expectation values, influence of sample size, correlation and covariance, normal distribution and its parameters), basics of Matlab, basics in optics

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students can

  • Describe imaging processes
  • Depict the physics of sensorics
  • Explain linear and non-linear filtering of signals
  • Establish interdisciplinary connections in the subject area and arrange them in their context
  • Interpret effects of the most important classes of imaging sensors and displays using mathematical methods and physical models.


Skills

Students are able to

  • Use highly sophisticated methods and procedures of the subject area
  • Identify problems and develop and implement creative solutions.

Students can solve simple arithmetical problems relating to the specification and design of image processing and image analysis systems.

Students are able to assess different solution approaches in multidimensional decision-making areas.

Students can undertake a prototypical analysis of processes in Matlab.


Personal Competence
Social Competence k.A.


Autonomy

Students can solve image analysis tasks independently using the relevant literature.


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 60 Minutes, Content of Lecture and materials in StudIP
Assignment for the Following Curricula Computer Science: Specialisation II: Intelligence Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Information and Communication Systems: Elective Compulsory
Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Information and Communication Systems: Specialisation Communication Systems, Focus Signal Processing: Elective Compulsory
Information and Communication Systems: Specialisation Secure and Dependable IT Systems, Focus Software and Signal Processing: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Information Technology: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation Intelligent Systems and Robotics: Elective Compulsory
Microelectronics and Microsystems: Specialisation Communication and Signal Processing: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Robotics and Computer Science: Elective Compulsory
Course L0126: Digital Image Analysis
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 4
CP 6
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Lecturer Prof. Rolf-Rainer Grigat
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Image representation, definition of images and volume data sets, illumination, radiometry, multispectral imaging, reflectivities, shape from shading
  • Perception of luminance and color, color spaces and transforms, color matching functions, human visual system, color appearance models
  • imaging sensors (CMOS, CCD, HDR, X-ray, IR), sensor characterization(EMVA1288), lenses and optics
  • spatio-temporal sampling (interpolation, decimation, aliasing, leakage, moiré, flicker, apertures)
  • features (filters, edge detection, morphology, invariance, statistical features, texture)
  • optical flow ( variational methods, quadratic optimization, Euler-Lagrange equations)
  • segmentation (distance, region growing, cluster analysis, active contours, level sets, energy minimization and graph cuts)
  • registration (distance and similarity, variational calculus, iterative closest points)
Literature

Bredies/Lorenz, Mathematische Bildverarbeitung, Vieweg, 2011
Wedel/Cremers, Stereo Scene Flow for 3D Motion Analysis, Springer 2011
Handels, Medizinische Bildverarbeitung, Vieweg, 2000
Pratt, Digital Image Processing, Wiley, 2001
Jain, Fundamentals of Digital Image Processing, Prentice Hall, 1989

Module M0676: Digital Communications

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Digital Communications (L0444) Lecture 2 3
Digital Communications (L0445) Recitation Section (large) 2 2
Laboratory Digital Communications (L0646) Practical Course 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Gerhard Bauch
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Mathematics 1-3
  • Signals and Systems
  • Fundamentals of Communications and Random Processes
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge The students are able to understand, compare and design modern digital information transmission schemes. They are familiar with the properties of linear and non-linear digital modulation methods. They can describe distortions caused by transmission channels and design and evaluate detectors including channel estimation and equalization. They know the principles of single carrier transmission and multi-carrier transmission as well as the fundamentals of basic multiple access schemes.
Skills The students are able to design and analyse a digital information transmission scheme including multiple access. They are able to choose a digital modulation scheme taking into account transmission rate, required bandwidth, error probability, and further signal properties. They can design an appropriate detector including channel estimation and equalization taking into account performance and complexity properties of suboptimum solutions. They are able to set parameters of a single carrier or multi carrier transmission scheme and trade the properties of both approaches against each other.
Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students can jointly solve specific problems.

Autonomy

The students are able to acquire relevant information from appropriate literature sources. They can control their level of knowledge during the lecture period by solving tutorial problems, software tools, clicker system.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes None Written elaboration
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Computational Science and Engineering: Specialisation II. Engineering Science: Elective Compulsory
Information and Communication Systems: Specialisation Communication Systems: Compulsory
Information and Communication Systems: Specialisation Secure and Dependable IT Systems, Focus Networks: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Information Technology: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Electrical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Microelectronics and Microsystems: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Course L0444: Digital Communications
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Gerhard Bauch
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Digital modulation methods

  • Coherent and non-coherent detection

  • Channel estimation and equalization

  • Single-Carrier- and multi carrier transmission schemes, multiple access schemes (TDMA, FDMA, CDMA, OFDM)

Literature

K. Kammeyer: Nachrichtenübertragung, Teubner

P.A. Höher: Grundlagen der digitalen Informationsübertragung, Teubner.

J.G. Proakis, M. Salehi: Digital Communications. McGraw-Hill.

S. Haykin: Communication Systems. Wiley

R.G. Gallager: Principles of Digital Communication. Cambridge

A. Goldsmith: Wireless Communication. Cambridge.

D. Tse, P. Viswanath: Fundamentals of Wireless Communication. Cambridge.

Course L0445: Digital Communications
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Gerhard Bauch
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L0646: Laboratory Digital Communications
Typ Practical Course
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Gerhard Bauch
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

- DSL transmission

- Random processes

- Digital data transmission

Literature

K. Kammeyer: Nachrichtenübertragung, Teubner

P.A. Höher: Grundlagen der digitalen Informationsübertragung, Teubner.

J.G. Proakis, M. Salehi: Digital Communications. McGraw-Hill.

S. Haykin: Communication Systems. Wiley

R.G. Gallager: Principles of Digital Communication. Cambridge

A. Goldsmith: Wireless Communication. Cambridge.

D. Tse, P. Viswanath: Fundamentals of Wireless Communication. Cambridge.

Module M0836: Communication Networks

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Selected Topics of Communication Networks (L0899) Project-/problem-based Learning 2 2
Communication Networks (L0897) Lecture 2 2
Communication Networks Excercise (L0898) Project-/problem-based Learning 1 2
Module Responsible Prof. Andreas Timm-Giel
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Fundamental stochastics
  • Basic understanding of computer networks and/or communication technologies is beneficial
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students are able to describe the principles and structures of communication networks in detail. They can explain the formal description methods of communication networks and their protocols. They are able to explain how current and complex communication networks work and describe the current research in these examples.

Skills

Students are able to evaluate the performance of communication networks using the learned methods. They are able to work out problems themselves and apply the learned methods. They can apply what they have learned autonomously on further and new communication networks.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to define tasks themselves in small teams and solve these problems together using the learned methods. They can present the obtained results. They are able to discuss and critically analyse the solutions.

Autonomy

Students are able to obtain the necessary expert knowledge for understanding the functionality and performance capabilities of new communication networks independently.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Presentation
Examination duration and scale 1.5 hours colloquium with three students, therefore about 30 min per student. Topics of the colloquium are the posters from the previous poster session and the topics of the module.
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Information and Communication Systems: Elective Compulsory
Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Control and Power Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Computational Science and Engineering: Specialisation I. Computer Science: Elective Compulsory
Information and Communication Systems: Specialisation Secure and Dependable IT Systems, Focus Networks: Elective Compulsory
Information and Communication Systems: Specialisation Communication Systems: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Information Technology: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Microelectronics and Microsystems: Specialisation Communication and Signal Processing: Elective Compulsory
Course L0899: Selected Topics of Communication Networks
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Andreas Timm-Giel
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content Example networks selected by the students will be researched on in a PBL course by the students in groups and will be presented in a poster session at the end of the term.
Literature
  • see lecture
Course L0897: Communication Networks
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Andreas Timm-Giel, Dr.-Ing. Koojana Kuladinithi
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
Literature
  • Skript des Instituts für Kommunikationsnetze
  • Tannenbaum, Computernetzwerke, Pearson-Studium


Further literature is announced at the beginning of the lecture.

Course L0898: Communication Networks Excercise
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Andreas Timm-Giel
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content Part of the content of the lecture Communication Networks are reflected in computing tasks in groups, others are motivated and addressed in the form of a PBL exercise.
Literature
  • announced during lecture

Module M0753: Software Verification

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Software Verification (L0629) Lecture 2 3
Software Verification (L0630) Recitation Section (small) 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Sibylle Schupp
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Automata theory and formal languages
  • Computational logic
  • Object-oriented programming, algorithms, and data structures
  • Functional programming or procedural programming
  • Concurrency
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students apply the major verification techniques in model checking and deductive verification. They explain in formal terms syntax and semantics of the underlying logics, and assess the expressivity of different logics as well as their limitations. They classify formal properties of software systems. They find flaws in formal arguments, arising from modeling artifacts or underspecification. 

Skills

Students formulate provable properties of a software system in a formal language. They develop logic-based models that properly abstract from the software under verification and, where necessary, adapt model or property. They construct proofs and property checks by hand or using tools for model checking or deductive verification, and reflect on the scope of the results. Presented with a verification problem in natural language, they select the appropriate verification technique and justify their choice.   

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students discuss relevant topics in class. They defend their solutions orally. They communicate in English. 

Autonomy

Using accompanying on-line material for self study, students can assess their level of knowledge continuously and adjust it appropriately.  Working on exercise problems, they receive additional feedback. Within limits, they can set their own learning goals. Upon successful completion, students can identify and precisely formulate new problems in academic or applied research in the field of software verification. Within this field, they can conduct independent studies to acquire the necessary competencies and compile their findings in academic reports. They can devise plans to arrive at new solutions or assess existing ones. 

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes 15 % Excercises
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Computer Science: Specialisation I. Computer and Software Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Computational Science and Engineering: Specialisation I. Computer Science: Elective Compulsory
Information and Communication Systems: Specialisation Communication Systems, Focus Software: Elective Compulsory
Information and Communication Systems: Specialisation Secure and Dependable IT Systems: Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Information Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L0629: Software Verification
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Sibylle Schupp
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Syntax and semantics of logic-based systems
  • Deductive verification
    • Specification
    • Proof obligations
    • Program properties
    • Automated vs. interactive theorem proving
  • Model checking
    • Foundations
    • Property languages
    • Tool support
  • Timed automata
  • Recent developments of verification techniques and applications
Literature
  • C. Baier and J-P. Katoen, Principles of Model Checking, MIT Press 2007.
  • M. Huth and M. Bryan, Logic in Computer Science. Modelling and Reasoning about Systems, 2nd Edition, 2004.
  • Selected Research Papers
Course L0630: Software Verification
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Sibylle Schupp
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0733: Software Analysis

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Software Analysis (L0631) Lecture 2 3
Software Analysis (L0632) Recitation Section (small) 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Sibylle Schupp
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Basic knowledge of software-engineering activities
  • Discrete algebraic structures
  • Object-oriented programming, algorithms, and data structures
  • Functional programming or Procedural programming
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students apply the major approaches to data-flow analysis, control-flow analysis, and type-based analysis, along with their classification schemes, and employ abstract interpretation. They explain the standard forms of internal representations and models, including their mathematical structure and properties, and evaluate their suitability for a particular analysis. They explain and categorize the major analysis algorithms. They distinguish precise solutions from approximative approaches, and show termination and soundness properties. 

Skills

Presented with an analytical task for a software artifact, students select appropriate approaches from software analysis, and justify their choice. They design suitable representations by modifying standard representations. They develop customized analyses and devise them as safe overapproximations. They formulate analyses in a formal way and construct arguments for their correctness, behavior, and precision.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students discuss relevant topics in class. They defend their solutions orally. They communicate in English. 

Autonomy

Using accompanying on-line material for self study, students can assess their level of knowledge continuously and adjust it appropriately.  Working on exercise problems, they receive additional feedback. Within limits, they can set their own learning goals. Upon successful completion, students can identify and precisely formulate new problems in academic or applied research in the field of software analysis. Within this field, they can conduct independent studies to acquire the necessary competencies and compile their findings in academic reports. They can devise plans to arrive at new solutions or assess existing ones. 

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Subject theoretical and practical work
Examination duration and scale software artifacts/mathematical write-ups; short presentation
Assignment for the Following Curricula Information and Communication Systems: Specialisation Communication Systems, Focus Software: Elective Compulsory
Information and Communication Systems: Specialisation Secure and Dependable IT Systems, Focus Software and Signal Processing: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Information Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L0631: Software Analysis
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Sibylle Schupp
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content


  • Modeling: Control-Flow Modeling, Data Dependences, Intermediate Languages)
  • Classical Bit-Vector Analyses (Reaching Definition, Very Busy Expressions, Liveness, Available Expressions, May/Must, Forward/Backward)
  • Monotone Frameworks (Lattices, Transfer Functions, Ascending Chain Condition, Distributivity, Constant Propagation)
  • Theory of Data-Flow Analysis (Tarski's Fixed Point Theorem,  Data-Flow Equations, MFP Solution, MOP Solution, Worklist Algorithm)
  • Non-Classical Data-Flow Analyses
  • Abstract Interpretation (Galois Connections, Approximating Fixed Points, Construction Techniques)
  • Type Systems (Type Derivation, Inference Trees, Algorithm W, Unification)
  • Recent Developments of Analysis Techniques and Applications


Literature
  • Flemming Nielsen, Hanne Nielsen, and Chris Hankin. Principles of Program Analysis. Springer, 2nd. ed. 2005.
  • Uday Khedker, Amitabha Sanyal, and Bageshri Karkara. Data Flow Analysis: Theory and Practice. CRC Press, 2009.
  • Benjamin Pierce, Types and Programming Languages, MIT Press.
  • Selected research papers
Course L0632: Software Analysis
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Sibylle Schupp
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1598: Image Processing

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Image Processing (L2443) Lecture 2 4
Image Processing (L2444) Recitation Section (small) 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Tobias Knopp
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Signal and Systems
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students know about

  • visual perception
  • multidimensional signal processing
  • sampling and sampling theorem
  • filtering
  • image enhancement
  • edge detection
  • multi-resolution procedures: Gauss and Laplace pyramid, wavelets
  • image compression
  • image segmentation
  • morphological image processing
Skills

The students can

  • analyze, process, and improve multidimensional image data
  • implement simple compression algorithms
  • design custom filters for specific applications
Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students can work on complex problems both independently and in teams. They can exchange ideas with each other and use their individual strengths to solve the problem.

Autonomy

Students are able to independently investigate a complex problem and assess which competencies are required to solve it. 

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Data Science: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Information and Communication Systems: Elective Compulsory
Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Information and Communication Systems: Specialisation Communication Systems, Focus Signal Processing: Elective Compulsory
Information and Communication Systems: Specialisation Secure and Dependable IT Systems, Focus Software and Signal Processing: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Information Technology: Elective Compulsory
Microelectronics and Microsystems: Specialisation Communication and Signal Processing: Elective Compulsory
Course L2443: Image Processing
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 92, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Tobias Knopp
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Visual perception
  • Multidimensional signal processing
  • Sampling and sampling theorem
  • Filtering
  • Image enhancement
  • Edge detection
  • Multi-resolution procedures: Gauss and Laplace pyramid, wavelets
  • Image Compression
  • Segmentation
  • Morphological image processing
Literature

Bredies/Lorenz, Mathematische Bildverarbeitung, Vieweg, 2011
Pratt, Digital Image Processing, Wiley, 2001
Bernd Jähne: Digitale Bildverarbeitung - Springer, Berlin 2005

Course L2444: Image Processing
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Tobias Knopp
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0629: Intelligent Autonomous Agents and Cognitive Robotics

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Intelligent Autonomous Agents and Cognitive Robotics (L0341) Lecture 2 4
Intelligent Autonomous Agents and Cognitive Robotics (L0512) Recitation Section (small) 2 2
Module Responsible Rainer Marrone
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Vectors, matrices, Calculus
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students can explain the agent abstraction, define intelligence in terms of rational behavior, and give details about agent design (goals, utilities, environments). They can describe the main features of environments. The notion of adversarial agent cooperation can be discussed in terms of decision problems and algorithms for solving these problems. For dealing with uncertainty in real-world scenarios, students can summarize how Bayesian networks can be employed as a knowledge representation and reasoning formalism in static and dynamic settings. In addition, students can define decision making procedures in simple and sequential settings, with and with complete access to the state of the environment. In this context, students can describe techniques for solving (partially observable) Markov decision problems, and they can recall techniques for measuring the value of information. Students can identify techniques for simultaneous localization and mapping, and can explain planning techniques for achieving desired states. Students can explain coordination problems and decision making in a multi-agent setting in term of different types of equilibria, social choice functions, voting protocol, and mechanism design techniques.

Skills

Students can select an appropriate agent architecture for concrete agent application scenarios. For simplified agent application students can derive decision trees and apply basic optimization techniques. For those applications they can also create Bayesian networks/dynamic Bayesian networks and apply bayesian reasoning for simple queries. Students can also name and apply different sampling techniques for simplified agent scenarios. For simple and complex decision making students can compute the best action or policies for concrete settings. In multi-agent situations students will apply techniques for finding different equilibria states,e.g., Nash equilibria. For multi-agent decision making students will apply different voting protocols and compare and explain the results.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to discuss their solutions to problems with others. They communicate in English

Autonomy

Students are able of checking their understanding of complex concepts by solving varaints of concrete problems

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula Computer Science: Specialisation II: Intelligence Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Information Technology: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation Intelligent Systems and Robotics: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Robotics and Computer Science: Elective Compulsory
Course L0341: Intelligent Autonomous Agents and Cognitive Robotics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 92, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Rainer Marrone
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Definition of agents, rational behavior, goals, utilities, environment types
  • Adversarial agent cooperation: 
    Agents with complete access to the state(s) of the environment, games, Minimax algorithm, alpha-beta pruning, elements of chance
  • Uncertainty: 
    Motivation: agents with no direct access to the state(s) of the environment, probabilities, conditional probabilities, product rule, Bayes rule, full joint probability distribution, marginalization, summing out, answering queries, complexity, independence assumptions, naive Bayes, conditional independence assumptions
  • Bayesian networks: 
    Syntax and semantics of Bayesian networks, answering queries revised (inference by enumeration), typical-case complexity, pragmatics: reasoning from effect (that can be perceived by an agent) to cause (that cannot be directly perceived).
  • Probabilistic reasoning over time:
    Environmental state may change even without the agent performing actions, dynamic Bayesian networks, Markov assumption, transition model, sensor model, inference problems: filtering, prediction, smoothing, most-likely explanation, special cases: hidden Markov models, Kalman filters, Exact inferences and approximations
  • Decision making under uncertainty:
    Simple decisions: utility theory, multivariate utility functions, dominance, decision networks, value of informatio
    Complex decisions: sequential decision problems, value iteration, policy iteration, MDPs
    Decision-theoretic agents: POMDPs, reduction to multidimensional continuous MDPs, dynamic decision networks
  • Simultaneous Localization and Mapping
  • Planning
  • Game theory (Golden Balls: Split or Share) 
    Decisions with multiple agents, Nash equilibrium, Bayes-Nash equilibrium
  • Social Choice 
    Voting protocols, preferences, paradoxes, Arrow's Theorem,
  • Mechanism Design 
    Fundamentals, dominant strategy implementation, Revelation Principle, Gibbard-Satterthwaite Impossibility Theorem, Direct mechanisms, incentive compatibility, strategy-proofness, Vickrey-Groves-Clarke mechanisms, expected externality mechanisms, participation constraints, individual rationality, budget balancedness, bilateral trade, Myerson-Satterthwaite Theorem
Literature
  1. Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach (Third Edition), Stuart Russell, Peter Norvig, Prentice Hall, 2010, Chapters 2-5, 10-11, 13-17
  2. Probabilistic Robotics, Thrun, S., Burgard, W., Fox, D. MIT Press 2005

  3. Multiagent Systems: Algorithmic, Game-Theoretic, and Logical Foundations, Yoav Shoham, Kevin Leyton-Brown, Cambridge University Press, 2009

Course L0512: Intelligent Autonomous Agents and Cognitive Robotics
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Rainer Marrone
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Specialization II. Logistics

Module M0978: Mobility of Goods and Logistics Systems

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Mobility of Goods, Logistics, Traffic (L1165) Lecture 2 2
International Logistics and Transport Systems (L1168) Project-/problem-based Learning 3 4
Module Responsible Prof. Heike Flämig
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Introduction to Logistics and Mobility
  • Foundations of Management
  • Legal Foundations of Transportation and Logistics
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students are able to...

  • give definitions of system theory, (international) transport chains and logistics in the context of supply chain management
  • explain trends and strategies for mobility of goods and logistics
  • describe elements of integrated and multi-modal transport chains and their advantages and disadvantages
  • deduce impacts of management decisions on logistics system and traffic system and explain how stakeholders influence them
  • explain the correlations between economy and logistics systems, mobility of goods, space-time-structures and the traffic system as well as ecology and politics



Skills

Students are able to...

  • Design intermodal transport chains and logistic concepts
  • apply the commodity chain theory and case study analysis
  • evaluate different international transport chains
  • cope with differences in cultures that influence international transport chains


Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to...

  • develop a feeling of social responsibility for their future jobs
  • give constructive feedback to others about their presentation skills
  • plan and execute teamwork tasks


Autonomy

Students are able to improve presentation skills by feedback of others

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes None Participation in excursions
Yes None Excercises
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale written exam (60 minutes), exercises in groups (min. 80% attendance), one-day excursion with short presentations
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Production and Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Infrastructure and Mobility: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Management: Elective Compulsory
Course L1165: Mobility of Goods, Logistics, Traffic
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Heike Flämig
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

The intention of this lecture is to provide a general system analysis-based overview of how transportation chains emerge and how they are developed. The respective advantages and disadvantages of different international transportation chains of goods are to be pointed out from a micro- and a macroeconomic point of view. The effects on the traffic system as well as the ecological and social consequences of a spatial devision of economical activities are to be discussed.
The overview of current international transportation chains is carried out on the basis of concrete material- and appendant information flows. Established transportation chains and some of their individual elements are to become transparent to the students by a number of practical examples.

  1. A conceptual systems model
  2. Elements of integrated and multi-modal transportation chains
  3. interaction of transport and traffic, demand and supply on different layers of the transport system
  4. Global Issues in Supply Chain Management
  5. Global Players and networks
  6. Logistics and corporate social responsibility (CSR)
  7. Methods and data for assessment of international transport chains
  8. Influence of cultural aspects on international transport chains
  9. New solutions using different focuses of the transport and logstics system


Literature

David, Pierre A.; Stewart, Richard D.: International Logistics: The Management of International Trade Operations, 3rd Edition, Mason, 2010

Schieck, Arno: Internationale Logistik: Objekte, Prozesse und Infrastrukturen grenzüberschreitender Güterströme, München, 2009

BLOECH, J., IHDE, G. B. (1997) Vahlens Großes Logistiklexikon, München, Verlag C.H. Beck

IHDE, G. B. (1991) Transport, Verkehr, Logistik, München, Verlag Franz Vahlen, 2. völlig überarbeitete und erweiterte Auflage

NUHN, H., HESSE, M. (2006) Verkehrsgeographie, Paderborn, München, Wien, Zürich, Verlage Ferdinand Schöningh

PFOHL, H.-C. (2000) Logistiksysteme - Betriebswirtschaftliche Grundlagen, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, Springer-Verlag, 6. Auflage


Course L1168: International Logistics and Transport Systems
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Heike Flämig
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content The problem-oriented-learning lecture consists of case studies and complex problems concerning the systemic characteristics of different modes of transport as well as the organization and realization of transport chains. Students get to know specific issues from practice of logistics and mobility of goods and work out recommondations for solutions.
Literature

David, Pierre A.; Stewart, Richard D.: International Logistics: The Management of International Trade Operations, 3rd Edition, Mason, 2010

Schieck, Arno: Internationale Logistik: Objekte, Prozesse und Infrastrukturen grenzüberschreitender Güterströme, München, 2009

Module M1132: Maritime Transport

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Maritime Transport (L0063) Lecture 2 3
Maritime Transport (L0064) Recitation Section (small) 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Carlos Jahn
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students are able to…

  • present the actors involved in the maritime transport chain with regard to their typical tasks;
  • name common cargo types in shipping and classify cargo to the corresponding categories;
  • explain operating forms in maritime shipping, transport options and management in transport networks;
  • weigh the advantages and disadvantages of the various modes of hinterland transport and apply them in practice;
  • present relevant factors for the location planning of ports and seaport terminals and discuss them in a problem-oriented way;
  • estimate the potential of digitisation in maritime shipping.


Skills

The students are able to...

  • determine the mode of transport, actors and functions of the actors in the maritime supply chain;
  • identify possible cost drivers in a transport chain and recommend appropriate proposals for cost reduction;
  • record, map and systematically analyse material and information flows of a maritime logistics chain, identify possible problems and recommend solutions;
  • perform risk assessments of human disruptions to the supply chain;
  • analyse accidents in the field of maritime logistics and evaluating their relevance in everyday life;
  • deal with current research topics in the field of maritime logistics in a differentiated way; 
  • apply different process modelling methods in a hitherto unknown field of activity and to work out the respective advantages.
Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to...

  • discuss and organise extensive work packages in groups;
  • document and present the elaborated results.
Autonomy

The students are capable to...

  • research and select technical literature, including standards and guidelines;
  • submit own shares in an extensive written elaboration in small groups in due time.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
No 15 % Subject theoretical and practical work Teilnahme an einem Planspiel und anschließende schriftliche Ausarbeitung
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Production and Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Infrastructure and Mobility: Elective Compulsory
Renewable Energies: Specialisation Wind Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L0063: Maritime Transport
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Carlos Jahn
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

The general tasks of maritime logistics include the planning, design, implementation and control of material and information flows in the logistics chain ship - port - hinterland. This includes technology assessment, selection, dimensioning and implementation as well as the operation of technologies.

The aim of the course is to provide students with knowledge of maritime transport and the actors involved in the maritime transport chain. Typical problem areas and tasks will be dealt with, taking into account the economic development. Thus, classical problems as well as current developments and trends in the field of maritime logistics are considered.

In the lecture, the components of the maritime logistics chain and the actors involved will be examined and risk assessments of human disturbances on the supply chain will be developed. In addition, students learn to estimate the potential of digitisation in maritime shipping, especially with regard to the monitoring of ships. Further content of the lecture is the different modes of transport in the hinterland, which students can evaluate after completion of the course regarding their advantages and disadvantages.

Literature
  • Brinkmann, Birgitt. Seehäfen: Planung und Entwurf. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag, 2005.
  • Schönknecht, Axel. Maritime Containerlogistik: Leistungsvergleich von Containerschiffen in intermodalen Transportketten. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag, 2009.
  • Stopford, Martin. Maritime Economics Routledge, 2009
Course L0064: Maritime Transport
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Carlos Jahn
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

The exercise lesson bases on the haptic management game MARITIME. MARITIME focuses on providing knowledge about structures and processes in a maritime transport network. Furthermore, the management game systematically provides process management methodology and also promotes personal skills of the participants.


Literature
  • Stopford, Martin. Maritime Economics Routledge, 2009
  • Brinkmann, Birgitt. Seehäfen: Planung und Entwurf. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag, 2005.
  • Schönknecht, Axel. Maritime Containerlogistik: Leistungsvergleich von Containerschiffen in intermodalen Transportketten. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag, 2009.


Module M1089: Integrated Maintenance and Spare Part Logistics

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Spare Part Logistics (L1403) Lecture 1 2
Maintenance Logistics (L1401) Lecture 2 2
Exercises to Integrated Maintenance and Spare Part Logistics (L1405) Recitation Section (small) 1 2
Module Responsible Prof. Kathrin Fischer
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge of logistical processes


Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
  • Students can explain basic concepts of maintenance and spare parts logistics and distinguish between them.
  • Students can explain key approaches and concepts of maintenance and spare parts logistics, locate them in a theoretical context and present practical applications.


Skills
  • Students can plan and evaluate processes, techniques and organizational forms in the field of maintenance and spare parts logistics.
  • Students can apply planning methods in maintenance and spare parts logistics to practical examples.
  • Students can develop and apply key performance indicator systems and carry out current status analyses.


Personal Competence
Social Competence
  • Students can present and argue their own expert opinions and work results in front of teachers and other students in an appropriate manner.
  • Students can achieve accurate work results as members of a team.


Autonomy
  • Students can access specialist knowledge independently and transfer the knowledge acquired to new problems.


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 2 hours
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Production and Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Course L1403: Spare Part Logistics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Ingo Martens
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Introduction: Logistical spare parts management, factors influencing need for spare parts, spare logistics requireents, integration of spare parts logistics and maintenance logistics.
  • Methoda: Analysis of spare parts stocks, diffentiation of spare parts strategy, forecasting need for spare parts, process chains
  • Planning: preliminary planning, concept planning and realisation, planning instruments and tools.
  • Practical examples for: optimization of spare parts centers, optimization of international spare parts distribution, performance-based logistics, new business models in spare parts logistics.



Literature

Scripts and text documents to be handed out during the course.


Course L1401: Maintenance Logistics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Ingo Martens
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Introduction: developments and trends in integrated maintenance and spare parts logistics, components of integrated maintenance, the terms maintenance and maintenance logistics, need for action and the “maintenance dilemma,” maintenance planning measures.
  • Basics of integrated maintenance: maintenance technology, organisational structures and workflows, maintenance controlling, integration of employees and management.
  • Knowledge-based business management and maintenance: Production and maintenance, condition knowledge and diagnosis, business management strategy, management, motivation and success.
  • Target and key performance indicator systems: developing target systems, performance indicator requirements, performance indicator analysis, strengths and weaknesses analysis, potential analysis, performance indicator models, monitoring (IH Cockpit)
  • Maintenance methods: make or buy versus outsourcing, total productive maintenance, differentiating between logistics strategies.
  • Maintenance planning: concept planning and realization, concept planning tasks and steps, supplementing planning basics, technology and organisation sub-concepts, overall concept of integrated maintenance and spare parts logistics.
  • Practical examples, including for: energy-efficient asset management, maintenance strategies in highly automated goods distribution centers, remote diagnosis and service management in wind energy plants, value stream analysis in maintenance.



Literature

Skripte und Textdokumente, die während der Vorlesung herausgegeben werden.

Scripts and text documents to be handed out during the course.


Course L1405: Exercises to Integrated Maintenance and Spare Part Logistics
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Ingo Martens
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
Literature Es wird die in den Vorlesungen "Instandhaltungdslogistik" und "Ersatzteillogistik" verwendete Literatur empfohlen.

Module M1133: Port Logistics

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Port Logistics (L0686) Lecture 2 3
Port Logistics (L1473) Recitation Section (small) 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Carlos Jahn
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge none
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Th

After completing the module, students can...

  • reflect on the development of seaports (in terms of the functions of the ports and the corresponding terminals, as well as the relevant operator models) and place them in their historical context;
  • explain and evaluate different types of seaport terminals and their specific characteristics (cargo, transhipment technologies, logistic functional areas);
  • analyze common planning tasks (e.g. berth planning, stowage planning, yard planning) at seaport terminals and develop suitable approaches (in terms of methods and tools) to solve these planning tasks;
  • identify future developments and trends regarding the planning and control of innovative seaport terminals and discuss them in a problem-oriented manner.


Skills

After completing the module, students will be able to...

  • recognize functional areas in ports and seaport terminals;
  • define and evaluate suitable operating systems for container terminals;
  • perform static calculations with regard to given boundary conditions, e.g. required capacity (parking spaces, equipment requirements, quay wall length, port access) on selected terminal types;
  • reliably estimate which boundary conditions influence common logistics indicators in the static planning of selected terminal types and to what extent.



Personal Competence
Social Competence

After completing the module, students can...

  • transfer the acquired knowledge to further questions of port logistics;
  • discuss and successfully organize extensive task packages in small groups;
  • in small groups, document work results in writing in an understandable form and present them to an appropriate extent.


Autonomy

After completing the module, the students are able to...

  • research and select specialist literature, including standards, guidelines and journal papers, and to develop the contents independently;
  • submit own parts in an extensive written elaboration in small groups in due time and to present them jointly within a fixed time frame.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
No 15 % Written elaboration
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Production and Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Infrastructure and Mobility: Elective Compulsory
Renewable Energies: Specialisation Wind Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L0686: Port Logistics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Carlos Jahn
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

Port Logistics deals with the planning, control, execution and monitoring of material flows and the associated information flows in the port system and its interfaces to numerous actors inside and outside the port area.

The extraordinary role of maritime transport in international trade requires very efficient ports. These must meet numerous requirements in terms of economy, speed, safety and the environment. Against this background, the lecture Port Logistics deals with the planning, control, execution and monitoring of material flows and the associated information flows in the port system and its interfaces to numerous actors inside and outside the port area. The aim of the lecture Port Logistics is to convey an understanding of structures and processes in ports. The focus will be on different types of terminals, their characteristical layouts and the technical equipment used as well as the ongoing digitization and interaction of the players involved.

In addition, renowned guest speakers from science and practice will be regularly invited to discuss some lecture-relevant topics from alternative perspectives.

The following contents will be conveyed in the lectures:

  • Instruction of structures and processes in the port
  • Planning, control, implementation and monitoring of material and information flows in the port
  • Fundamentals of different terminals, characteristical layouts and the technical equipment used
  • Handling of current issues in port logistics
Literature
  • Alderton, Patrick (2013). Port Management and Operations.
  • Biebig, Peter and Althof, Wolfgang and Wagener, Norbert (2017). Seeverkehrswirtschaft: Kompendium.
  • Brinkmann, Birgitt. Seehäfen: Planung und Entwurf. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag, 2005.
  • Büter, Clemens (2013). Außenhandel: Grundlagen internationaler Handelsbeziehungen.
  • Gleissner, Harald and Femerling, J. Christian (2012). Logistik: Grundlagen, Übungen, Fallbeispiele.
  • Jahn, Carlos; Saxe, Sebastian (Hg.). Digitalization of Seaports - Visions of the Future,  Stuttgart: Fraunhofer Verlag, 2017.
  • Kummer, Sebastian (2019). Einführung in die Verkehrswirtschaft
  • Lun, Y.H.V. and Lai, K.-H. and Cheng, T.C.E. (2010). Shipping and Logistics Management.
  • Woitschützke, Claus-Peter (2013). Verkehrsgeografie.
Course L1473: Port Logistics
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Carlos Jahn
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

The content of the exercise is the independent preparation of a scientific paper plus an accompanying presentation on a current topic of port logistics. The paper deals with current topics of port logistics. For example, the future challenges in sustainability and productivity of ports, the digital transformation of terminals and ports or the introduction of new regulations by the International Maritime Organization regarding the verified gross weight of containers. Due to the international orientation of the event, the paper is to be prepared in English.


Literature
  • Alderton, Patrick (2013). Port Management and Operations.
  • Biebig, Peter and Althof, Wolfgang and Wagener, Norbert (2017). Seeverkehrswirtschaft: Kompendium.
  • Brinkmann, Birgitt. Seehäfen: Planung und Entwurf. (2005) Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag.
  • Büter, Clemens (2013). Außenhandel: Grundlagen internationaler Handelsbeziehungen.
  • Gleissner, Harald and Femerling, J. Christian (2012). Logistik: Grundlagen, Übungen, Fallbeispiele.
  • Jahn, Carlos; Saxe, Sebastian (Hg.) (2017) Digitalization of Seaports - Visions of the Future,  Stuttgart: Fraunhofer Verlag.
  • Kummer, Sebastian (2019). Einführung in die Verkehrswirtschaft
  • Lun, Y.H.V. and Lai, K.-H. and Cheng, T.C.E. (2010). Shipping and Logistics Management.
  • Woitschützke, Claus-Peter (2013). Verkehrsgeografie.

Module M0977: Construction Logistics and Project Management

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Construction Logistics (L1163) Lecture 1 2
Construction Logistics (L1164) Recitation Section (small) 1 2
Project Development and Management (L1161) Lecture 1 1
Project Development and Management (L1162) Project-/problem-based Learning 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Heike Flämig
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge none
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students can...

  • give definitions of the main terms of construction logistics and project development and management
  • name advantages and disadvantages of internal or external construction logistics
  • explain characteristics of products, demand and production of construction objects and their consequences for construction specific supply chains
  • differentiate constructions logistics from other logistics systems
Skills

Students can...

  • carry out project life cycle assessments
  • apply methods and instruments of construction logistics
  • apply methods and instruments of project development and management
  • apply methods and instruments of conflict management
  • design supply and waste removal concepts for a construction project
Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students can...

  • hold presentations in and for groups
  • apply methods of conflict solving skills in group work and case studies
Autonomy

Students can...

  • solve problems by holistic, systemic and flow oriented thinking
  • improve their creativity, negotiation skills, conflict and crises solution skills by applying methods of moderation in case studies
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written elaboration
Examination duration and scale Two written papers with presentations
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Structural Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Geotechnical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Water and Traffic: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Civil Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Production and Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Infrastructure and Mobility: Elective Compulsory
Course L1163: Construction Logistics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Heike Flämig
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

The lecture gives deeper insight how important logistics are as a competetive factor for construction projects and which issues are to be adressed.

The following toppics are covered:

  • competetive factor logistics
  • the concept of systems, planning and coordination of logistics
  • material, equipment and reverse logistics
  • IT in construction logistics
  • elements of the planning model of construction logistics and their connections
  • flow oriented logistics systems for construction projects
  • logistics concepts for ready to use construction projects (especially procurement and waste removel logistics)
  • best practice examples (construction logistics Potsdamer Platz, recent case study of the region)

Contents of the lecture are deepened in special exercises.

Literature

Flämig, Heike: Produktionslogistik in Stadtregionen. In: Forschungsverbund Ökologische Mobilität (Hrsg.) Forschungsbericht Bd. 15.2. Wuppertal 2000.

Krauss, Siri: Die Baulogistik in der schlüsselfertigen Ausführung,  Bauwerk Verlag GmbH Berlin 2005.

Lipsmeier, Klaus: Abfallkennzahlen für Neubauleistungen im Hochbau : Verlag Forum für Abfallwirtschaft und Altlasten, 2004.

Schmidt, Norbert: Wettbewerbsfaktor Baulogistik. Neue Wertschöpfungspotenziale in der Baustoffversorgung. In: Klaus, Peter: Edition Logistik. Band 6. Deutscher Verkehrs-Verlag. Hamburg 2003.

Seemann, Y.F. (2007): Logistikkoordination als Organisationseinheit bei der Bauausführung Wissenschaftsverlag Mainz in Aachen, Aachen. (Mitteilungen aus dem Fachgebiet Baubetrieb und Bauwirtschaft (Hrsg. Kuhne, V.): Heft 20)


Course L1164: Construction Logistics
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Heike Flämig
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L1161: Project Development and Management
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Heike Flämig, Dr. Anton Worobei
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

Within the lecture, the main aspects of project development and management are tought:

  • Terms and definitions of project management
  • Advantages and disadvantages of different ways of project handling
  • organization, information, coordination and documentation
  • cost and fincance management in projects
  • time- and capacity management in projects
  • specific methods and instruments for successful team work

Contents of the lecture are deepened in special exercises.

Literature Projektmanagement-Fachmann. Band 1 und Band 2. RKW-Verlag, Eschborn, 2004.
Course L1162: Project Development and Management
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Heike Flämig, Dr. Anton Worobei
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1012: Laboratory of Logistics Engineering and Automatisation

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Laboratory Technical Logistics and Automatisation (L1462) Seminar 4 6
Module Responsible Prof. Jochen Kreutzfeldt
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Bachelor degree in logistics

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge The students will acquire the following knowledge:

1. The students will learn various technical solutions for solving logistical problems using automatisation in daily practice.

2. The students know the necessary steps to implement a selected technical solution to automate logistical processes.

3. The students know the approaches and obstacles to implement technical solutions for automating logistical processes.

Skills The students will acquire the following skills:

1. The students are able to select technical solutions of automatisation for logistical problems of warehousing, conveying, sorting, order picking and identifying and evaluate the implementability of the alternatives.

2. The students are able to implement selected solutions of automatisation in the model scale.

3. The students are able to estimate the implementation costs of selected solutions of automatisation.

Personal Competence
Social Competence The students will acquire the following social skills:

1. The students are able to develop technical solutions for logistical problems and implement them on a model scale within a group of students.

2. The technical solutions from the group can be jointly documented and presented to an audience.

3. The students are able to derive new ideas and improvements from the feedback received related to their developed solution proposals.

Autonomy The students will acquire the following competencies:

1. Students are able, under the guidance of supervisors, to develop and implement independently solutions of automatisation for logistical problems of warehousing, conveying, sorting, order picking and identifying.

2. The students are able to evaluate their technical solutions and discuss the pros and cons.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written elaboration
Examination duration and scale Prototype construction in laboratory with documentation (group work)
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Logistics: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Production and Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Course L1462: Laboratory Technical Logistics and Automatisation
Typ Seminar
Hrs/wk 4
CP 6
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Lecturer Prof. Jochen Kreutzfeldt
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

The aim of the seminar is the practical introduction of students in various technical solutions to logistical problems. Above all, the guided development of own solutions is the core task in the laboratory. The problems and solutions will be drawn from the following logistic topics:

(1) warehousing

(2) conveying

(3) sorting

(4) order picking

(5) identifying

The students develop technical solutions in small groups for selected problems and implement them on a lab scale. The solutions are presented to an audience and advantages and disadvantages are discussed. The recorded feedback is then added to the model solution.

Literature

Dembowski, Klaus (2015): Raspberry Pi - Das technische Handbuch. Konfiguration, Hardware, Applikationserstellung. 2., erw. und überarb. Aufl. 2015. Wiesbaden: Springer Vieweg.

Follmann, Rüdiger (2014): Das Raspberry Pi Kompendium. 2014. Aufl. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg (Xpert.press).

Griemert, Rudolf (2015): Fördertechnik. Auswahl und Berechnung von Elementen und Baugruppen. [S.l.]: Morgan Kaufmann.

Hompel, Michael ten; Büchter, Hubert; Franzke, Ulrich (2008): Identifikationssysteme und Automatisierung. [Intralogistik]. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer.

Hompel, Michael ten; Beck, Maria; Sadowsky, Volker (2011): Kommissionierung. Materialflusssysteme 2 - Planung und Berechnung der Kommissionierung in der Logistik. Berlin [u.a.]: Springer.

Jodin, Dirk; Hompel, Michael ten (2012): Sortier- und Verteilsysteme. Grundlagen, Aufbau, Berechnung und Realisierung. 2. Aufl. Berlin: Springer Berlin.

Martin, Heinrich (2014): Transport- und Lagerlogistik. Planung, Struktur, Steuerung und Kosten von Systemen der Intralogistik. 9., vollst. überarb. u. akt. Aufl. 2014. Wiesbaden: Imprint: Springer Vieweg.

Purdum, Jack J. (2014): Beginning C for Arduino. Learn C programming for the Arduino. Second edition.: Springer Berlin.

McRoberts, Michael (2014): Beginning Arduino. Second edition.: Springer Berlin.

Module M1100: Railways

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Railways (L1466) Lecture 2 3
Railways (L1468) Recitation Section (large) 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Carsten Gertz
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Introduction to railways
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students can...

  • concieve the  entrepreneurial perspective of transport and infrastructure companies
  • estimate intra- and intermodal competition
  • understand regulatory and transport policy determinants
  • reflect megatrends in the transport market  
  • understand the key performance indicators for railway transport market
Skills

Students can...

  • apply traffic Intermodal perspective
  • understand strategic challenges, opportunities and issues of companies
  • recognize the relevance of sustainability and digitization for companies
Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students can...

  • discuss and organize task packages in small groups
  • document and present work results in small groups
Autonomy

Students can...

  • research and select literature
  • submit their own shares of an extensive written work in small groups and present it collaborativly within a fixed time frame
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Production and Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Infrastructure and Mobility: Elective Compulsory
Course L1466: Railways
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Rüdiger Grube
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
Literature
Course L1468: Railways
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Rüdiger Grube
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1402: Machine Learning in Logistics

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Digitalization in Traffic and Logistics (L2004) Lecture 1 2
Basics of Machine Learning (L2003) Lecture 1 2
Machine Learning in Logistics (L2005) Recitation Section (small) 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Carlos Jahn
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge None
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students understand specific methods of machine learning. They are able to select appropriate procedures for given data. They can explain the principals of different learning methods. In addition, they can explain the major conceptual differences of learning methods.


Skills

Students can inspect, describe, and apply selected machine learning techniques to provided data sets. Additionally they can prepare raw data for machine learning techniques.

They are able to evaluate the usability in concrete company-relevant contexts and they know how to derive the requirements and potentials of an effective application; for example in relation to controlling or forecasting approaches for the operational planning of companies.

Personal Competence
Social Competence Students are capable of:
  • Discussing and organizing extensive research tasks in small groups
  • Jointly describing, differentiating between and evaluating problems  
Autonomy Students are able:
  • To research and select specialized literature
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
No 15 % Presentation
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Production and Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Infrastructure and Mobility: Elective Compulsory
Course L2004: Digitalization in Traffic and Logistics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Carlos Jahn
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

When dealing with large amounts of data (big data), it is no longer possible for humans to spot all relevant data by simply looking at the raw data. In the context of logistics, the handling of temporal data and movement data plays a particularly important role. In this course the visualization, the calculation of statistics and the application of machine learning algorithms are covered. Students are given various tools for later practical application.

The course utilizes the methods learned in "Basics of Machine Learning" in the context of practical application in the field of logistics. In addition, various pre-processing steps for raw data are presented and it is discussed, under which conditions these measurements are applicable.

The lecture contents are:

  • The Project Structure for Machine Learning
  • Use cases for machine learning in logistics
  • Time-related data
  • Movement data
  • Anomaly detection
  • Feature engineering in image recognition
Literature John D. Kelleher, Fundamentals of Machine Learning for Predictive Data Analytics: Algorithms, Worked Examples, and Case Studies (MIT Press)

Aurélien Géron, Praxiseinstieg Machine Learning mit Scikit-Learn und TensorFlow : Konzepte, Tools und Techniken für intelligente Systeme (O'Reilly)

Jake VanderPlas, Data Science mit Python : das Handbuch für den Einsatz von IPython, Jupyter, NumPy, Pandas, Matplotlib, Scikit-Learn (MITP Verlags-GmbH & Co. KG)

Course L2003: Basics of Machine Learning
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Dozenten des SD E
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

Students are able to understand specific procedures of machine learning and to use on real life examples. Students are able to use appropriate procedures for given data.

Students are able to explain the differences between instance and model based learning approaches and are able to use specific approaches in machine learning on the base of static and incremental growing data.

By the use of uncertainty the students can explain how axioms, parameter or structures can be learned. Additional the students learn to develop different cluster techniques.

Planned content:

  • Supervised Learning:
    • Regressions
    • Decision trees 
    • Bayesian networks 
    • K-next neighbors
    • Logistical regressions
    • Neuronal Networks 
    • Support Vector Machines
    • Ensemble Learning
  • Unsupervised Learning:
    • Hierarchical Clustering, K-Mean
Literature John D. Kelleher, Fundamentals of Machine Learning for Predictive Data Analytics: Algorithms, Worked Examples, and Case Studies (MIT Press)

Tom M. Mitchell, Machine Learning

Kevin P. Murphy, Machine Learning: A Probabilistic Perspective

Course L2005: Machine Learning in Logistics
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Carlos Jahn
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

In the exercise the skills which the students acquired in the lectures will be applied to real life examples. 

Literature John D. Kelleher, Fundamentals of Machine Learning for Predictive Data Analytics: Algorithms, Worked Examples, and Case Studies (MIT Press)

Tom M. Mitchell, Machine Learning

Kevin P. Murphy, Machine Learning: A Probabilistic Perspective

Aurélien Géron, Praxiseinstieg Machine Learning mit Scikit-Learn und TensorFlow : Konzepte, Tools und Techniken für intelligente Systeme (O'Reilly)

Jake VanderPlas, Data Science mit Python : das Handbuch für den Einsatz von IPython, Jupyter, NumPy, Pandas, Matplotlib, Scikit-Learn (MITP Verlags-GmbH & Co. KG)

Module M1406: Transport Aircraft Operations

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Airline Operations (L1310) Lecture 3 3
Airport Operations (L1276) Lecture 3 3
Module Responsible Prof. Volker Gollnick
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Lecture Air Transportation Systems 

Basic Knowledge in Aviation, logistics, mobility 

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Principles of Air Traffic Management and technologies

Design and modelling of traffic flows, avionics and sensor systems, cockpit design

Principles of Airline organization and business

Fleet setup, fleet operation, aircraft selection, maintenance, repair overhaul technologies and business


Skills
  • Understanding and application of different interdisciplinary interdependencies
  • Integration and assessment of new technologies in the air transportation system
  • Modelling and assessment of flight guidance systems
  • Airline fleet planning and fleet operation
Personal Competence
Social Competence
  • Working in interdisciplinary teams
  • Communication
Autonomy

Organization of workflows and -strategies

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Production and Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Course L1310: Airline Operations
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick, Dr. Karl Echtermeyer
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  1. Introdution and overview
  2. Airline business models
  3. Interdependencies in flight planning (network management, slot management, netzwork structures, aircraft circulation)
  4. Operative flight preparation (weight & balance, payload/range, etc.)
  5. fleet policy
  6. Aircraft assessment and fleet planning
  7. Airline organisation
  8. Aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul
Literature

Volker Gollnick, Dieter Schmitt: The Air Transport System, Springer Berlin Heidelberg New York, 2014

Paul Clark: “Buying the Big Jets”, Ashgate 2008

Mike Hirst: The Air Transport System, AIAA, 2008

Course L1276: Airport Operations
Typ Lecture