Program description

Content

The 4-semester research-oriented master's degree (MSc) "Theoretical Mechanical Engineering" builds on research-oriented Mechanical Engineering-oriented undergraduate degree programs (BSc). Required are in-depth knowledge in mathematics and science and engineering fundamentals. The graduates acquire basic research and methodological oriented content, including interdisciplinary orientation, mechanical engineering knowledge and associated mechanical engineering expertise to develop mathematical descriptions, analysis and synthesis of complex technical systems methods, products or processes. In this course, the program combines the two most important theoretical and methodological areas, namely the simulation technology and systems theory. For this purpose, mathematical foundations and in-depth knowledge in areas such as the Technical dynamics, control engineering, numerical and structural mechanics are learned.


Career prospects

The master's degree program in Theoretical Mechanical Engineering prepares its graduates for professional and managerial positions in research and development. Through the course’s focus on theory-method-oriented content and principles as well as intensive scientific thinking training, graduates are qualified for a wide field of work, especially in the area of mechanical and automotive engineering, biotechnology and medical technology, power engineering, aerospace engineering, shipbuilding, automation , materials science and related fields.


Learning target

The graduates can:

• analyze and solve scientific problems, even if they are defined uncommon or incomplete and competing specifications

• formulate abstract and complex problems from a new or evolving the field of their discipline

• apply innovative methods in basic research oriented problem solving and develop new scientific methods

• identify information needs and find information

  • plan and perform theoretical and experimental investigations

• Evaluate data critically and draw conclusions

• analyze and evaluate the use of new and emerging technologies.

Graduates are able to:

• develop concepts and solutions to basic research, partly unusual problems, possibly involving other disciplines,

  • create and develop new products, processes and methods

• apply their scientific engineering judgment to work with complex, possibly incomplete information, to identify contradictions and deal with them

• classify knowledge from different fields methodically and systematically, to combine and handle complexity;

• familiarize themselves systematically, and in a short time frame, with new tasks

  • To reflect systematically the non-technical implications of engineering activity and to act responsibly

• to develop solutions and further methodological skills.


Program structure

The course is divided into basic research core courses and an application-specific specialization. In addition to the core subjects and mathematics, students develop in-depth knowledge in areas such as technical dynamics, control engineering, numerical and structural mechanics. To deepen the foundations of application specific specializations, modules are selected. Other technical and non-technical elective courses may be selected from the range of subjects TUHH and the University of Hamburg. During the last semester the Master thesis is carried out.

The curricular content is thus divided into six groups:

• Key skills, required courses (24 ECTS)

• Key skills, electives (24 ECTS)

• Project Work (12 ECTS)

• A specialization (18 ECTS)

• General non-technical content (12 ECTS)

• Master's thesis (30 ECTS).

The areas of specialization are:

• Biological and Medical Engineering

• Energy Technology

• Aircraft Systems

• Maritime Technology

• Numerical and computer science

• Product development and production

• Materials Engineering

The choice of specialization is required, its contents are closely related to the research topics of the Institute. The key skills already acquired in undergraduate study for mechanical engineering are developed within the Master's program.

Core qualification

Important

Module M0523: Business & Management

Module Responsible Prof. Matthias Meyer
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge None
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
  • Students are able to find their way around selected special areas of management within the scope of business management.
  • Students are able to explain basic theories, categories, and models in selected special areas of business management.
  • Students are able to interrelate technical and management knowledge.


Skills
  • Students are able to apply basic methods in selected areas of business management.
  • Students are able to explain and give reasons for decision proposals on practical issues in areas of business management.


Personal Competence
Social Competence
  • Students are able to communicate in small interdisciplinary groups and to jointly develop solutions for complex problems

Autonomy
  • Students are capable of acquiring necessary knowledge independently by means of research and preparation of material.


Workload in Hours Depends on choice of courses
Credit points 6
Courses
Information regarding lectures and courses can be found in the corresponding module handbook published separately.

Module M0524: Non-technical Courses for Master

Module Responsible Dagmar Richter
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge None
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The Nontechnical Academic Programms (NTA)

imparts skills that, in view of the TUHH’s training profile, professional engineering studies require but are not able to cover fully. Self-reliance, self-management, collaboration and professional and personnel management competences. The department implements these training objectives in its teaching architecture, in its teaching and learning arrangements, in teaching areas and by means of teaching offerings in which students can qualify by opting for specific competences and a competence level at the Bachelor’s or Master’s level. The teaching offerings are pooled in two different catalogues for nontechnical complementary courses.

The Learning Architecture

consists of a cross-disciplinarily study offering. The centrally designed teaching offering ensures that courses in the nontechnical academic programms follow the specific profiling of TUHH degree courses.

The learning architecture demands and trains independent educational planning as regards the individual development of competences. It also provides orientation knowledge in the form of “profiles”.

The subjects that can be studied in parallel throughout the student’s entire study program - if need be, it can be studied in one to two semesters. In view of the adaptation problems that individuals commonly face in their first semesters after making the transition from school to university and in order to encourage individually planned semesters abroad, there is no obligation to study these subjects in one or two specific semesters during the course of studies.

Teaching and Learning Arrangements

provide for students, separated into B.Sc. and M.Sc., to learn with and from each other across semesters. The challenge of dealing with interdisciplinarity and a variety of stages of learning in courses are part of the learning architecture and are deliberately encouraged in specific courses.

Fields of Teaching

are based on research findings from the academic disciplines cultural studies, social studies, arts, historical studies, communication studies, migration studies and sustainability research, and from engineering didactics. In addition, from the winter semester 2014/15 students on all Bachelor’s courses will have the opportunity to learn about business management and start-ups in a goal-oriented way.

The fields of teaching are augmented by soft skills offers and a foreign language offer. Here, the focus is on encouraging goal-oriented communication skills, e.g. the skills required by outgoing engineers in international and intercultural situations.

The Competence Level

of the courses offered in this area is different as regards the basic training objective in the Bachelor’s and Master’s fields. These differences are reflected in the practical examples used, in content topics that refer to different professional application contexts, and in the higher scientific and theoretical level of abstraction in the B.Sc.

This is also reflected in the different quality of soft skills, which relate to the different team positions and different group leadership functions of Bachelor’s and Master’s graduates in their future working life.

Specialized Competence (Knowledge)

Students can

  • explain specialized areas in context of the relevant non-technical disciplines,
  • outline basic theories, categories, terminology, models, concepts or artistic techniques in the disciplines represented in the learning area,
  • different specialist disciplines relate to their own discipline and differentiate it as well as make connections, 
  • sketch the basic outlines of how scientific disciplines, paradigms, models, instruments, methods and forms of representation in the specialized sciences are subject to individual and socio-cultural interpretation and historicity,
  • Can communicate in a foreign language in a manner appropriate to the subject.
Skills

Professional Competence (Skills)

In selected sub-areas students can

  • apply basic and specific methods of the said scientific disciplines,
  • aquestion a specific technical phenomena, models, theories from the viewpoint of another, aforementioned specialist discipline,
  • to handle simple and advanced questions in aforementioned scientific disciplines in a sucsessful manner,
  • justify their decisions on forms of organization and application in practical questions in contexts that go beyond the technical relationship to the subject.



Personal Competence
Social Competence

Personal Competences (Social Skills)

Students will be able

  • to learn to collaborate in different manner,
  • to present and analyze problems in the abovementioned fields in a partner or group situation in a manner appropriate to the addressees,
  • to express themselves competently, in a culturally appropriate and gender-sensitive manner in the language of the country (as far as this study-focus would be chosen), 
  • to explain nontechnical items to auditorium with technical background knowledge.





Autonomy

Personal Competences (Self-reliance)

Students are able in selected areas

  • to reflect on their own profession and professionalism in the context of real-life fields of application
  • to organize themselves and their own learning processes      
  • to reflect and decide questions in front of a broad education background
  • to communicate a nontechnical item in a competent way in writen form or verbaly
  • to organize themselves as an entrepreneurial subject country (as far as this study-focus would be chosen)     



Workload in Hours Depends on choice of courses
Credit points 6
Courses
Information regarding lectures and courses can be found in the corresponding module handbook published separately.

Module M1259: Technical Complementary Course Core Studies for TMBMS (according to Subject Specific Regulations)

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Module Responsible Prof. Robert Seifried
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge see FSPO
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge see FSPO
Skills see FSPO
Personal Competence
Social Competence see FSPO
Autonomy see FSPO
Workload in Hours Depends on choice of courses
Credit points 6
Assignment for the Following Curricula Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory

Module M0808: Finite Elements Methods

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Finite Element Methods (L0291) Lecture 2 3
Finite Element Methods (L0804) Recitation Section (large) 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Otto von Estorff
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Mechanics I (Statics, Mechanics of Materials) and Mechanics II (Hydrostatics, Kinematics, Dynamics)
Mathematics I, II, III (in particular differential equations)

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students possess an in-depth knowledge regarding the derivation of the finite element method and are able to give an overview of the theoretical and methodical basis of the method.



Skills

The students are capable to handle engineering problems by formulating suitable finite elements, assembling the corresponding system matrices, and solving the resulting system of equations.



Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students can work in small groups on specific problems to arrive at joint solutions.

Autonomy

The students are able to independently solve challenging computational problems and develop own finite element routines. Problems can be identified and the results are critically scrutinized.



Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
No 20 % Midterm
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Energy Systems: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Aircraft Systems Engineering: Specialisation Aircraft Systems: Elective Compulsory
Aircraft Systems Engineering: Specialisation Air Transportation Systems: Elective Compulsory
Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Mechatronics: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Core qualification: Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Core qualification: Compulsory
Technomathematics: Specialisation III. Engineering Science: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Course L0291: Finite Element Methods
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Otto von Estorff
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

- General overview on modern engineering
- Displacement method
- Hybrid formulation
- Isoparametric elements
- Numerical integration
- Solving systems of equations (statics, dynamics)
- Eigenvalue problems
- Non-linear systems
- Applications

- Programming of elements (Matlab, hands-on sessions)
- Applications

Literature

Bathe, K.-J. (2000): Finite-Elemente-Methoden. Springer Verlag, Berlin

Course L0804: Finite Element Methods
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Otto von Estorff
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0846: Control Systems Theory and Design

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Control Systems Theory and Design (L0656) Lecture 2 4
Control Systems Theory and Design (L0657) Recitation Section (small) 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Herbert Werner
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Introduction to Control Systems
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
  • Students can explain how linear dynamic systems are represented as state space models; they can interpret the system response to initial states or external excitation as trajectories in state space
  • They can explain the system properties controllability and observability, and their relationship to state feedback and state estimation, respectively
  • They can explain the significance of a minimal realisation
  • They can explain observer-based state feedback and how it can be used to achieve tracking and disturbance rejection
  • They can extend all of the above to multi-input multi-output systems
  • They can explain the z-transform and its relationship with the Laplace Transform
  • They can explain state space models and transfer function models of discrete-time systems
  • They can explain the experimental identification of ARX models of dynamic systems, and how the identification problem can be solved by solving a normal equation
  • They can explain how a state space model can be constructed from a discrete-time impulse response

Skills
  • Students can transform transfer function models into state space models and vice versa
  • They can assess controllability and observability and construct minimal realisations
  • They can design LQG controllers for multivariable plants
  •  They can carry out a controller design both in continuous-time and discrete-time domain, and decide which is  appropriate for a given sampling rate
  • They can identify transfer function models and state space models of dynamic systems from experimental data
  • They can carry out all these tasks using standard software tools (Matlab Control Toolbox, System Identification Toolbox, Simulink)

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students can work in small groups on specific problems to arrive at joint solutions. 

Autonomy

Students can obtain information from provided sources (lecture notes, software documentation, experiment guides) and use it when solving given problems.

They can assess their knowledge in weekly on-line tests and thereby control their learning progress.


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Energy Systems: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Computational Science and Engineering: Specialisation II. Engineering Science: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Electrical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Mechatronics: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Mechatronics: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Core qualification: Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Course L0656: Control Systems Theory and Design
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 92, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Herbert Werner
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

State space methods (single-input single-output)

• State space models and transfer functions, state feedback 
• Coordinate basis, similarity transformations 
• Solutions of state equations, matrix exponentials, Caley-Hamilton Theorem
• Controllability and pole placement 
• State estimation, observability, Kalman decomposition 
• Observer-based state feedback control, reference tracking 
• Transmission zeros
• Optimal pole placement, symmetric root locus 
Multi-input multi-output systems
• Transfer function matrices, state space models of multivariable systems, Gilbert realization 
• Poles and zeros of multivariable systems, minimal realization 
• Closed-loop stability
• Pole placement for multivariable systems, LQR design, Kalman filter 

Digital Control
• Discrete-time systems: difference equations and z-transform 
• Discrete-time state space models, sampled data systems, poles and zeros 
• Frequency response of sampled data systems, choice of sampling rate 

System identification and model order reduction 
• Least squares estimation, ARX models, persistent excitation 
• Identification of state space models, subspace identification 
• Balanced realization and model order reduction 

Case study
• Modelling and multivariable control of a process evaporator using Matlab and Simulink 
Software tools
• Matlab/Simulink

Literature
  • Werner, H., Lecture Notes „Control Systems Theory and Design“
  • T. Kailath "Linear Systems", Prentice Hall, 1980
  • K.J. Astrom, B. Wittenmark "Computer Controlled Systems" Prentice Hall, 1997
  • L. Ljung "System Identification - Theory for the User", Prentice Hall, 1999
Course L0657: Control Systems Theory and Design
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Herbert Werner
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1204: Modelling and Optimization in Dynamics

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Flexible Multibody Systems (L1632) Lecture 2 3
Optimization of dynamical systems (L1633) Lecture 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Robert Seifried
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Mathematics I, II, III
  • Mechanics I, II, III, IV
  • Simulation of dynamical Systems
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students demonstrate basic knowledge and understanding of modeling, simulation and analysis of complex rigid and flexible multibody systems and methods for optimizing dynamic systems after successful completion of the module.

Skills

Students are able

+ to think holistically

+ to independently, securly and critically analyze and optimize basic problems of the dynamics of rigid and flexible multibody systems

+ to describe dynamics problems mathematically

+ to optimize dynamics problems

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to

+ solve problems in heterogeneous groups and to document the corresponding results.


Autonomy

Students are able to

+ assess their knowledge by means of exercises.

+ acquaint themselves with the necessary knowledge to solve research oriented tasks.


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Oral exam
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Energy Systems: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Aircraft Systems Engineering: Specialisation Aircraft Systems: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation System Design: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation Intelligent Systems and Robotics: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L1632: Flexible Multibody Systems
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Robert Seifried, Dr. Alexander Held
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  1. Basics of Multibody Systems
  2. Basics of Continuum Mechanics
  3. Linear finite element modelles and modell reduction
  4. Nonlinear finite element Modelles: absolute nodal coordinate formulation
  5. Kinematics of an elastic body 
  6. Kinetics of an elastic body
  7. System assembly
Literature

Schwertassek, R. und Wallrapp, O.: Dynamik flexibler Mehrkörpersysteme. Braunschweig, Vieweg, 1999.

Seifried, R.: Dynamics of Underactuated Multibody Systems, Springer, 2014.

Shabana, A.A.: Dynamics of Multibody Systems. Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, 2004, 3. Auflage.


Course L1633: Optimization of dynamical systems
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Robert Seifried
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  1. Formulation and classification of optimization problems 
  2. Scalar Optimization
  3. Sensitivity Analysis
  4. Unconstrained Parameter Optimization
  5. Constrained Parameter Optimization
  6. Stochastic optimization
  7. Multicriteria Optimization
  8. Topology Optimization


Literature

Bestle, D.: Analyse und Optimierung von Mehrkörpersystemen. Springer, Berlin, 1994.

Nocedal, J. , Wright , S.J. : Numerical Optimization. New York: Springer, 2006.


Module M1306: Control Lab C

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Control Lab IX (L1836) Practical Course 1 1
Control Lab VII (L1834) Practical Course 1 1
Control Lab VIII (L1835) Practical Course 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Herbert Werner
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • State space methods
  • LQG control
  • H2 and H-infinity optimal control
  • uncertain plant models and robust control
  •  LPV control
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
  • Students can explain the difference between validation of a control lop in simulation and experimental validation
Skills
  • Students are capable of applying basic system identification tools (Matlab System Identification Toolbox) to identify a dynamic model that can be used for controller synthesis
  • They are capable of using standard software tools (Matlab Control Toolbox) for the design and implementation of LQG controllers
  • They are capable of using standard software tools (Matlab Robust Control Toolbox) for the mixed-sensitivity design and the implementation of H-infinity optimal controllers
  • They are capable of representing model uncertainty, and of designing and implementing a robust controller
  • They are capable of using standard software tools (Matlab Robust Control Toolbox) for the design and the implementation of LPV gain-scheduled controllers
Personal Competence
Social Competence
  • Students can work in teams to conduct experiments and document the results
Autonomy
  • Students can independently carry out simulation studies to design and validate control loops
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Credit points 3
Course achievement None
Examination Written elaboration
Examination duration and scale 1
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Control and Power Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation Intelligent Systems and Robotics: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation System Design: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L1836: Control Lab IX
Typ Practical Course
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Herbert Werner, Patrick Göttsch, Adwait Datar
Language EN
Cycle WiSe/SoSe
Content

One of the offered experiments in control theory.

Literature

Experiment Guides

Course L1834: Control Lab VII
Typ Practical Course
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Herbert Werner, Patrick Göttsch
Language EN
Cycle WiSe/SoSe
Content

One of the offered experiments in control theory.

Literature

Experiment Guides

Course L1835: Control Lab VIII
Typ Practical Course
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Herbert Werner, Patrick Göttsch, Adwait Datar
Language EN
Cycle WiSe/SoSe
Content

One of the offered experiments in control theory.

Literature

Experiment Guides

Module M1150: Continuum Mechanics

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Continuum Mechanics (L1533) Lecture 2 3
Continuum Mechanics Exercise (L1534) Recitation Section (small) 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Christian Cyron
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basics of linear continuum mechanics as taught, e.g., in the module Mechanics II (forces and moments, stress, linear strain, free-body principle, linear-elastic constitutive laws, strain energy).

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge


The students can explain the fundamental concepts to calculate the mechanical behavior of materials.


Skills

The students can set up balance laws and apply basics of deformation theory to specific aspects, both in applied contexts as in research contexts.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to develop solutions, to present them to specialists in written form and to develop ideas further.


Autonomy

The students are able to assess their own strengths and weaknesses. They can independently and on their own identify and solve problems in the area of continuum mechanics and acquire the knowledge required to this end.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Materials Science: Specialisation Modeling: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Course L1533: Continuum Mechanics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Christian Cyron
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Fundamentals of tensor calculus
    • Transformation invariance
    • Tensor algebra
    • Tensor analysis
  • Kinematics
    • Motion of continuum
    • Deformation of infinitesimal line, area and volume elements
    • Material and spatial description
    • Polar decomposition
    • Spectral decomposition
    • Objectivity
    • Strain measures
    • Time derivatives
      • Partial / material time derivatives
      • Objective time rates
      • Strain and deformation rates
    • Transport theorems
  • Balance equations (global and local form)
    • Balance of mass
    • The stress state
      • Surface traction vectors
      • Cauchy's fundamental theorem
      • Stress tensors (Cauchy, 1. and 2. Piola-Kirchhoff, Kirchhoff stress tensor)
    • Balance of linear momentum
    • Balance of angular momentum
    • Balance of energy
    • Balance of entropy
    • Clausius-Duhem inequality
  • Constitutive laws
    • Constitutive assumptions
    • Fluids
    • Elastic solids
      • Hyperelasticity
      • Material symmetry
    • Elasto-plastic solids
  • Analysis
    • Initial-boundary value problems and their numerical solution


Literature

R. Greve: Kontinuumsmechanik: Ein Grundkurs für Ingenieure und Physiker

I-S. Liu: Continuum Mechanics, Springer

weitere siehe in der Literaturliste des Scripts


Course L1534: Continuum Mechanics Exercise
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Christian Cyron
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • kinematics of undeformed and deformed bodies
  • balance equations (balance of mass, balance of energy, …)
  • stress states
  • material modelling


Literature

R. Greve: Kontinuumsmechanik: Ein Grundkurs für Ingenieure und Physiker

I-S. Liu: Continuum Mechanics, Springer


Module M0751: Vibration Theory

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Vibration Theory (L0701) Integrated Lecture 4 6
Module Responsible Prof. Norbert Hoffmann
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Calculus
  • Linear Algebra
  • Engineering Mechanics
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge Students are able to denote terms and concepts of Vibration Theory and develop them further.
Skills Students are able to denote methods of Vibration Theory and develop them further.
Personal Competence
Social Competence Students can reach working results also in groups.
Autonomy Students are able to approach individually research tasks in Vibration Theory.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 2 Hours
Assignment for the Following Curricula Energy Systems: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Mechatronics: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Mechatronics: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Core qualification: Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Core qualification: Compulsory
Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Course L0701: Vibration Theory
Typ Integrated Lecture
Hrs/wk 4
CP 6
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Lecturer Prof. Norbert Hoffmann
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content Linear and Nonlinear Single and Multiple Degree of Freedom Oscillations and Waves.
Literature K. Magnus, K. Popp, W. Sextro: Schwingungen. Physikalische Grundlagen und mathematische Behandlung von Schwingungen. Springer Verlag, 2013.

Module M0714: Numerical Treatment of Ordinary Differential Equations

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Numerical Treatment of Ordinary Differential Equations (L0576) Lecture 2 3
Numerical Treatment of Ordinary Differential Equations (L0582) Recitation Section (small) 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Daniel Ruprecht
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Mathematik I, II, III für Ingenieurstudierende (deutsch oder englisch) oder Analysis & Lineare Algebra I + II sowie Analysis III für Technomathematiker
  • Basic MATLAB knowledge
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students are able to

  • list numerical methods for the solution of ordinary differential equations and explain their core ideas,
  • repeat convergence statements for the treated numerical methods (including the prerequisites tied to the underlying problem),
  • explain aspects regarding the practical execution of a method.
  • select the appropriate numerical method for concrete problems, implement the numerical algorithms efficiently and interpret the numerical results
Skills

Students are able to

  • implement (MATLAB), apply and compare numerical methods for the solution of ordinary differential equations,
  • to justify the convergence behaviour of numerical methods with respect to the posed problem and selected algorithm,
  • for a given problem, develop a suitable solution approach, if necessary by the composition of several algorithms, to execute this approach and to critically evaluate the results.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to

  • work together in heterogeneously composed teams (i.e., teams from different study programs and background knowledge), explain theoretical foundations and support each other with practical aspects regarding the implementation of algorithms.
Autonomy

Students are capable

  • to assess whether the supporting theoretical and practical excercises are better solved individually or in a team,
  • to assess their individual progress and, if necessary, to ask questions and seek help.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Bioprocess Engineering: Specialisation A - General Bioprocess Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering: Specialisation Chemical Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering: Specialisation General Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Computer Science: Specialisation III. Mathematics: Elective Compulsory
Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Control and Power Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy Systems: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Interdisciplinary Mathematics: Specialisation II. Numerical - Modelling Training: Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation Intelligent Systems and Robotics: Elective Compulsory
Technomathematics: Specialisation I. Mathematics: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Process Engineering: Specialisation Chemical Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Process Engineering: Specialisation Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L0576: Numerical Treatment of Ordinary Differential Equations
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Daniel Ruprecht
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

Numerical methods for Initial Value Problems

  • single step methods
  • multistep methods
  • stiff problems
  • differential algebraic equations (DAE) of index 1

Numerical methods for Boundary Value Problems

  • multiple shooting method
  • difference methods
  • variational methods


Literature
  • E. Hairer, S. Noersett, G. Wanner: Solving Ordinary Differential Equations I: Nonstiff Problems
  • E. Hairer, G. Wanner: Solving Ordinary Differential Equations II: Stiff and Differential-Algebraic Problems
Course L0582: Numerical Treatment of Ordinary Differential Equations
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Daniel Ruprecht
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1203: Applied Dynamics: Numerical and experimental methods

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Lab Applied Dynamics (L1631) Practical Course 3 3
Applied Dynamics (L1630) Lecture 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Robert Seifried
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Mathematics I, II, III, Mechanics I, II, III, IV

Numerical Treatment of Ordinary Differential Equations
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students can represent the most important methods of dynamics after successful completion of the module Technical dynamics and have a good understanding of the main concepts in the technical dynamics.

Skills

Students are able

+ to think holistically

+ to independently, securly and critically analyze and optimize basic problems of the dynamics of rigid and flexible multibody systems

+ to describe dynamics problems mathematically

+ to investigate dynamics problems both experimentally and numerically

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to

+ solve problems in heterogeneous groups and to document the corresponding results.


Autonomy

Students are able to

+ assess their knowledge by means of exercises and experiments.

+ acquaint themselves with the necessary knowledge to solve research oriented tasks.


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes None Subject theoretical and practical work Versuche Fachlabor
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Course L1631: Lab Applied Dynamics
Typ Practical Course
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Dr. Marc-André Pick, Dr. Marc-André Pick
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

Practical exercises are performed in groups. The examples are taken from different areas of applied dynamics, such as numerical simulation, experimental validation and experimental vibration analysis.


Literature

Schiehlen, W.; Eberhard, P.: Technische Dynamik, 4. Auflage, Vieweg+Teubner: Wiesbaden, 2014.

Course L1630: Applied Dynamics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Robert Seifried
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  1. Modelling of Multibody Systems
  2. Basics from kinematics and kinetics
  3. Constraints
  4. Multibody systems in minimal coordinates
  5. State space, linearization and modal analysis
  6. Multibody systems with kinematic constraints
  7. Multibody systems as DAE
  8. Non-holonomic multibody systems
  9. Experimental Methods in Dynamics
Literature

Schiehlen, W.; Eberhard, P.: Technische Dynamik, 4. Auflage, Vieweg+Teubner: Wiesbaden, 2014.

Woernle, C.: Mehrkörpersysteme, Springer: Heidelberg, 2011.

Seifried, R.: Dynamics of Underactuated Multibody Systems, Springer, 2014.

Module M0752: Nonlinear Dynamics

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Nonlinear Dynamics (L0702) Integrated Lecture 4 6
Module Responsible Prof. Norbert Hoffmann
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Calculus
  • Linear Algebra
  • Engineering Mechanics
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge Students are able to reflect existing terms and concepts in Nonlinear Dynamics and to develop and research new terms and concepts.
Skills Students are able to apply existing methods and procesures of Nonlinear Dynamics and to develop novel methods and procedures.
Personal Competence
Social Competence Students can reach working results also in groups.
Autonomy Students are able to approach given research tasks individually and to identify and follow up novel research tasks by themselves.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 2 Hours
Assignment for the Following Curricula Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Mechatronics: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Mechatronics: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation System Design: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation Intelligent Systems and Robotics: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Course L0702: Nonlinear Dynamics
Typ Integrated Lecture
Hrs/wk 4
CP 6
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Lecturer Prof. Norbert Hoffmann
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content Fundamentals of Nonlinear Dynamics.
Literature S. Strogatz: Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos. Perseus, 2013.

Module M0838: Linear and Nonlinear System Identifikation

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Linear and Nonlinear System Identification (L0660) Lecture 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Herbert Werner
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Classical control (frequency response, root locus)
  • State space methods
  • Discrete-time systems
  • Linear algebra, singular value decomposition
  • Basic knowledge about stochastic processes
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
  • Students can explain the general framework of the prediction error method and its application to a variety of linear and nonlinear model structures
  • They can explain how multilayer perceptron networks are used to model nonlinear dynamics
  • They can explain how an approximate predictive control scheme can be based on neural network models
  • They can explain the idea of subspace identification and its relation to Kalman realisation theory
Skills
  • Students are capable of applying the predicition error method to the experimental identification of linear and nonlinear models for dynamic systems
  • They are capable of implementing a nonlinear predictive control scheme based on a neural network model
  • They are capable of applying subspace algorithms to the experimental identification of linear models for dynamic systems
  • They can do the above using standard software tools (including the Matlab System Identification Toolbox)
Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students can work in mixed groups on specific problems to arrive at joint solutions. 

Autonomy

Students are able to find required information in sources provided (lecture notes, literature, software documentation) and use it to solve given problems. 

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Credit points 3
Course achievement None
Examination Oral exam
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Control and Power Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation Intelligent Systems and Robotics: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation System Design: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Course L0660: Linear and Nonlinear System Identification
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Herbert Werner
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Prediction error method
  • Linear and nonlinear model structures
  • Nonlinear model structure based on multilayer perceptron network
  • Approximate predictive control based on multilayer perceptron network model
  • Subspace identification
Literature
  • Lennart Ljung, System Identification - Theory for the User, Prentice Hall 1999
  • M. Norgaard, O. Ravn, N.K. Poulsen and L.K. Hansen, Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Dynamic Systems, Springer Verlag, London 2003
  • T. Kailath, A.H. Sayed and B. Hassibi, Linear Estimation, Prentice Hall 2000

Module M0657: Computational Fluid Dynamics II

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Computational Fluid Dynamics II (L0237) Lecture 2 3
Computational Fluid Dynamics II (L0421) Recitation Section (large) 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Thomas Rung
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Basics of computational and general thermo/fluid dynamics
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Establish a thorough understanding of Finite-Volume approaches. Familiarise with details of the theoretical background of complex CFD algorithms.

Skills

Ability to manage of interface problems and build-up of coding skills. Ability to evaluate, assess and benchmark different solution options. 


Personal Competence
Social Competence Practice of team working during team exercises.
Autonomy Indenpendent analysis of specific solution approaches.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Oral exam
Examination duration and scale 0.5h-0.75h
Assignment for the Following Curricula Energy Systems: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Process Engineering: Specialisation Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L0237: Computational Fluid Dynamics II
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Thomas Rung
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content Computational Modelling of complex single- and multiphase flows using higher-order approximations for unstructured grids and mehsless particle-based methods.
Literature

1)
Vorlesungsmanuskript und Übungsunterlagen

2)
J.H. Ferziger, M. Peric:
Computational Methods for Fluid Dynamics,
Springer

Course L0421: Computational Fluid Dynamics II
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Thomas Rung
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0840: Optimal and Robust Control

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Optimal and Robust Control (L0658) Lecture 2 3
Optimal and Robust Control (L0659) Recitation Section (small) 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Herbert Werner
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Classical control (frequency response, root locus)
  • State space methods
  • Linear algebra, singular value decomposition
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
  • Students can explain the significance of the matrix Riccati equation for the solution of LQ problems.
  • They can explain the duality between optimal state feedback and optimal state estimation.
  • They can explain how the H2 and H-infinity norms are used to represent stability and performance constraints.
  • They can explain how an LQG design problem can be formulated as special case of an H2 design problem.
  • They  can explain how model uncertainty can be represented in a way that lends itself to robust controller design
  • They can explain how - based on the small gain theorem - a robust controller can guarantee stability and performance for an uncertain plant.
  • They understand how analysis and synthesis conditions on feedback loops can be represented as linear matrix inequalities.
Skills
  • Students are capable of designing and tuning LQG controllers for multivariable plant models.
  • They are capable of representing a H2 or H-infinity design problem in the form of a generalized plant, and of using standard software tools for solving it.
  • They are capable of translating time and frequency domain specifications for control loops into constraints on closed-loop sensitivity functions, and of carrying out a mixed-sensitivity design.
  • They are capable of constructing an LFT uncertainty model for an uncertain system, and of designing a mixed-objective robust controller.
  • They are capable of formulating analysis and synthesis conditions as linear matrix inequalities (LMI), and of using standard LMI-solvers for solving them.
  • They can carry out all of the above using standard software tools (Matlab robust control toolbox).
Personal Competence
Social Competence Students can work in small groups on specific problems to arrive at joint solutions. 
Autonomy

Students are able to find required information in sources provided (lecture notes, literature, software documentation) and use it to solve given problems. 


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Oral exam
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Control and Power Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy Systems: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation Intelligent Systems and Robotics: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation System Design: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Course L0658: Optimal and Robust Control
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Herbert Werner
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Optimal regulator problem with finite time horizon, Riccati differential equation
  • Time-varying and steady state solutions, algebraic Riccati equation, Hamiltonian system
  • Kalman’s identity, phase margin of LQR controllers, spectral factorization
  • Optimal state estimation, Kalman filter, LQG control
  • Generalized plant, review of LQG control
  • Signal and system norms, computing H2 and H∞ norms
  • Singular value plots, input and output directions
  • Mixed sensitivity design, H∞ loop shaping, choice of weighting filters
  • Case study: design example flight control
  • Linear matrix inequalities, design specifications as LMI constraints (H2, H∞ and pole region)
  • Controller synthesis by solving LMI problems, multi-objective design
  • Robust control of uncertain systems, small gain theorem, representation of parameter uncertainty
Literature
  • Werner, H., Lecture Notes: "Optimale und Robuste Regelung"
  • Boyd, S., L. El Ghaoui, E. Feron and V. Balakrishnan "Linear Matrix Inequalities in Systems and Control", SIAM, Philadelphia, PA, 1994
  • Skogestad, S. and I. Postlewhaite "Multivariable Feedback Control", John Wiley, Chichester, England, 1996
  • Strang, G. "Linear Algebra and its Applications", Harcourt Brace Jovanovic, Orlando, FA, 1988
  • Zhou, K. and J. Doyle "Essentials of Robust Control", Prentice Hall International, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 1998
Course L0659: Optimal and Robust Control
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Herbert Werner
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1339: Design optimization and probabilistic approaches in structural analysis

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Design Optimization and Probabilistic Approaches in Structural Analysis (L1873) Lecture 2 3
Design Optimization and Probabilistic Approaches in Structural Analysis (L1874) Recitation Section (large) 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Benedikt Kriegesmann
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Technical mechanics
  • Higher math
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
  • Design optimization
    • Gradient based methods
    • Genetic algorithms
    • Optimization with constraints
    • Topology optimization
  • Reliability analysis
    • Stochastic basics
    • Monte Carlo methods
    • Semi-analytic approaches
  • robust design optimization
    • Robustness measures
    • Coupling of design optimization and reliability analysis
Skills
  • Application of optimization algorithms and probabilistic methods in the design of structures
  • Programming with Matlab
  • Implementation of algorithms
  • Debugging
Personal Competence
Social Competence
  • Team work
  •  Oral explanation of the the work
Autonomy
  • Application of methods learned in the framework of a home work
  • Familiarizing with source code provided
  • Description of approaches and results
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written elaboration
Examination duration and scale 10 pages
Assignment for the Following Curricula Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Course L1873: Design Optimization and Probabilistic Approaches in Structural Analysis
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Benedikt Kriegesmann
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

In the course the theoretic basics for design optimization and reliability analysis are taught, where the focus is on the application of such methods. The lectures will consist of presentations as well as computer exercises. In the computer exercises, the methods learned will be implemented in Matlab for understanding the practical realization.

The following contents will be considered:

  • Design optimization
    • Gradient based methods
    • Genetic algorithms
    • Optimization with constraints
    • Topology optimization
  • Reliability analysis
    • Stochastic basics
    • Monte Carlo methods
    • Semi-analytic approaches
  • robust design optimization
    • Robustness measures
    • Coupling of design optimization and reliability analysis
Literature

[1] Arora, Jasbir. Introduction to Optimum Design. 3rd ed. Boston, MA: Academic Press, 2011.
[2] Haldar, A., and S. Mahadevan. Probability, Reliability, and Statistical Methods in Engineering Design. John Wiley & Sons New York/Chichester, UK, 2000.

Course L1874: Design Optimization and Probabilistic Approaches in Structural Analysis
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Benedikt Kriegesmann
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

Matlab exercises complementing the lecture

Literature siehe Vorlesung

Module M0604: High-Order FEM

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
High-Order FEM (L0280) Lecture 3 4
High-Order FEM (L0281) Recitation Section (large) 1 2
Module Responsible Prof. Alexander Düster
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Knowledge of partial differential equations is recommended.

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students are able to
+ give an overview of the different (h, p, hp) finite element procedures.
+ explain high-order finite element procedures.
+ specify problems of finite element procedures, to identify them in a given situation and to explain their mathematical and mechanical background.

Skills

Students are able to
+ apply high-order finite elements to problems of structural mechanics.
+ select for a given problem of structural mechanics a suitable finite element procedure.
+ critically judge results of high-order finite elements.
+ transfer their knowledge of high-order finite elements to new problems.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to
+ solve problems in heterogeneous groups and to document the corresponding results.

Autonomy

Students are able to
+ assess their knowledge by means of exercises and E-Learning.
+ acquaint themselves with the necessary knowledge to solve research oriented tasks.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
No 10 % Presentation Forschendes Lernen
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Energy Systems: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Materials Science: Specialisation Modeling: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Technomathematics: Specialisation III. Engineering Science: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Course L0280: High-Order FEM
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Alexander Düster
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

1. Introduction
2. Motivation
3. Hierarchic shape functions
4. Mapping functions
5. Computation of element matrices, assembly, constraint enforcement and solution
6. Convergence characteristics
7. Mechanical models and finite elements for thin-walled structures
8. Computation of thin-walled structures
9. Error estimation and hp-adaptivity
10. High-order fictitious domain methods


Literature

[1] Alexander Düster, High-Order FEM, Lecture Notes, Technische Universität Hamburg-Harburg, 164 pages, 2014
[2] Barna Szabo, Ivo Babuska, Introduction to Finite Element Analysis – Formulation, Verification and Validation, John Wiley & Sons, 2011


Course L0281: High-Order FEM
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Alexander Düster
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0711: Numerical Mathematics II

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Numerical Mathematics II (L0568) Lecture 2 3
Numerical Mathematics II (L0569) Recitation Section (small) 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Sabine Le Borne
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Numerical Mathematics I
  • Python knowledge
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students are able to

  • name advanced numerical methods for interpolation, approximation, integration, eigenvalue problems, eigenvalue problems, nonlinear root finding problems and explain their core ideas,
  • repeat convergence statements for the numerical methods, sketch convergence proofs,
  • explain practical aspects of numerical methods concerning runtime and storage needs
  • explain aspects regarding the practical implementation of numerical methods with respect to computational and storage complexity.

Skills

Students are able to

  • implement, apply and compare advanced numerical methods in Python,
  • justify the convergence behaviour of numerical methods with respect to the problem and solution algorithm and to transfer it to related problems,
  • for a given problem, develop a suitable solution approach, if necessary through composition of several algorithms, to execute this approach and to critically evaluate the results
Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to

  • work together in heterogeneously composed teams (i.e., teams from different study programs and background knowledge), explain theoretical foundations and support each other with practical aspects regarding the implementation of algorithms.
Autonomy

Students are capable

  • to assess whether the supporting theoretical and practical excercises are better solved individually or in a team,
  • to assess their individual progess and, if necessary, to ask questions and seek help.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Oral exam
Examination duration and scale 25 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Computer Science: Specialisation III. Mathematics: Elective Compulsory
Computational Science and Engineering: Specialisation III. Mathematics: Elective Compulsory
Technomathematics: Specialisation I. Mathematics: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Course L0568: Numerical Mathematics II
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Sabine Le Borne, Dr. Jens-Peter Zemke
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content
  1. Error and stability: Notions and estimates
  2. Rational interpolation and approximation
  3. Multidimensional interpolation (RBF) and approximation (neural nets)
  4. Quadrature: Gaussian quadrature, orthogonal polynomials
  5. Linear systems: Perturbation theory of decompositions, structured matrices
  6. Eigenvalue problems: LR-, QD-, QR-Algorithmus
  7. Nonlinear systems of equations: Newton and Quasi-Newton methods, line search (optional)
  8. Krylov space methods: Arnoldi-, Lanczos methods (optional)
Literature
  • Skript
  • Stoer/Bulirsch: Numerische Mathematik 1, Springer
  • Dahmen, Reusken: Numerik für Ingenieure und Naturwissenschaftler, Springer
Course L0569: Numerical Mathematics II
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Sabine Le Borne, Dr. Jens-Peter Zemke
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0727: Stochastics

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Stochastics (L0777) Lecture 2 4
Stochastics (L0778) Recitation Section (small) 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Matthias Schulte
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Calculus
  • Discrete algebraic structures (combinatorics)
  • Propositional logic
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
  • Students can name the basic concepts in Stochastics. They are able to explain them using appropriate examples.
  • Students can discuss logical connections between these concepts.  They are capable of illustrating these connections with the help of examples.
  • They know proof strategies and can reproduce them.
Skills
  • Students can model problems from stochastics with the help of the concepts studied in this course. Moreover, they are capable of solving them by applying established methods.
  • Students are able to discover and verify further logical connections between the concepts studied in the course.
  • For a given problem, the students can develop and execute a suitable approach, and are able to critically evaluate the results.
Personal Competence
Social Competence
  • Students are able to work together (e.g. on their regular home work) in heterogeneously composed teams (i.e., teams from different study programs and background knowledge)  and to present their results appropriately (e.g. during exercise class).
  • In doing so, they can communicate new concepts according to the needs of their cooperating partners. Moreover, they can design examples to check and deepen the understanding of their peers.

Autonomy
  • Students are capable of checking their understanding of complex concepts on their own. They can specify open questions precisely and know where to get help in solving them.
  • Students can put their knowledge in relation to the contents of other lectures.
  • Students have developed sufficient persistence to be able to work for longer periods in a goal-oriented manner on hard problems.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula General Engineering Science (German program, 7 semester): Specialisation Computer Science: Compulsory
Computer Science: Core qualification: Compulsory
Data Science: Core qualification: Compulsory
Computational Science and Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Logistics and Mobility: Specialisation Engineering Science: Elective Compulsory
Logistics and Mobility: Specialisation Information Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Engineering and Management - Major in Logistics and Mobility: Specialisation Information Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L0777: Stochastics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 92, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Matthias Schulte
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Definitions of probability, conditional probability
  • Random variables, dependencies, independence assumptions, 
  • Marginal and joint probabilities
  • Distributions and density functions
  • Characteristics: expected values, variance, standard deviation, moments
  • Multivariate distributions
  • Law of large numbers and central limit theorem
  • Basic notions of stochastic processes
  • Basic concepts of statistics (point estimators, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing)
Literature
  1. Methoden der statistischen Inferenz, Likelihood und Bayes, Held, L., Spektrum 2008
  2. Stochastik für Informatiker, Dümbgen, L., Springer 2003
  3. Statistik: Der Weg zur Datenanalyse, Fahrmeir, L., Künstler R., Pigeot, I, Tutz, G., Springer 2010
  4. Stochastik, Georgii, H.-O., deGruyter, 2009
  5. Probability and Random Processes, Grimmett, G., Stirzaker, D., Oxford University Press, 2001
  6. Programmieren mit R, Ligges, U., Springer 2008
Course L0778: Stochastics
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Matthias Schulte
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1181: Research Project Theoretical Mechanical Engineering

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Module Responsible Dozenten des SD M
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Finite-element-methods
  • Control systems theory and design
  • Applied dynamics
  • Numerics of ordinary differential equations
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students are able to demonstrate their detailed knowledge in the field of theoretical mechanical engineering. They can exemplify the state of technology and application and discuss critically in the context of actual problems and general conditions of science and society.

The students can develop solving strategies and approaches for fundamental and practical problems in theoretical mechanical engineering. They may apply theory based procedures and integrate safety-related, ecological, ethical, and economic view points of science and society.

Scientific work techniques that are used can be described and critically reviewed.


Skills

The students are able to independently select methods for the project work and to justify this choice. They can explain how these methods relate to the field of work and how the context of application has to be adjusted. General findings and further developments may essentially be outlined.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to condense the relevance and the structure of the project work, the work steps and the sub-problems for the presentation and discussion in front of a bigger group. They can lead the discussion and give a feedback on the project to their colleagues.

Autonomy

The students are capable of independently planning and documenting the work steps and procedures while considering the given deadlines. This includes the ability to accurately procure the newest scientific information. Furthermore, they can obtain feedback from experts with regard to the progress of the work, and to accomplish results on the state of the art in science and technology.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 360, Study Time in Lecture 0
Credit points 12
Course achievement None
Examination Study work
Examination duration and scale according to FSPO
Assignment for the Following Curricula Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory

Module M1398: Selected Topics in Multibody Dynamics and Robotics

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Formulas and Vehicles - Mathematics and Mechanics in Autonomous Driving (L1981) Project-/problem-based Learning 2 6
Module Responsible Prof. Robert Seifried
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Mechanics IV, Applied Dynamics or Robotics

Numerical Treatment of Ordinary Differential Equations

Control Systems Theory and Design

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

After successful completion of the module students demonstrate deeper knowledge and understanding in selected application areas of multibody dynamics and robotics

Skills

Students are able

+ to think holistically

+ to independently, securly and critically analyze and optimize basic problems of the dynamics of rigid and flexible multibody systems

+ to describe dynamics problems mathematically

+ to implement dynamical problems on hardware

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to

+ solve problems in heterogeneous groups and to document the corresponding results and present them

Autonomy

Students are able to

+ assess their knowledge by means of exercises and projects.

+ acquaint themselves with the necessary knowledge to solve research oriented tasks.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 152, Study Time in Lecture 28
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Presentation
Examination duration and scale TBA
Assignment for the Following Curricula Mechatronics: Specialisation Intelligent Systems and Robotics: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation System Design: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Course L1981: Formulas and Vehicles - Mathematics and Mechanics in Autonomous Driving
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 2
CP 6
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 152, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Robert Seifried, Daniel-André Dücker
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
Literature

Seifried, R.: Dynamics of underactuated multibody systems, Springer, 2014

Popp, K.; Schiehlen, W.: Ground vehicle dynamics, Springer, 2010

Specialization Bio- and Medical Technology

The specialization „biotechnology and medical technology“ consists of modules for Intelligent Systems, Robotics and Navigation in medicine, supplemented by Endoprostheses and Materials and Regenerative Medicine, and completed by the modules Imaging Systems in medicine and Industrial Image Transformations in electives. Thus, the acquisition of knowledge and skills in engineering specific aspects of biotechnology and medical technology is at the heart of this specialization. In addition, subjects in the Technical Supplement Course for TMBMS (according FSPO) are freely selectable.

Module M1173: Applied Statistics

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Applied Statistics (L1584) Lecture 2 3
Applied Statistics (L1586) Project-/problem-based Learning 2 2
Applied Statistics (L1585) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Michael Morlock
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge of statistical methods

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge Students can explain the statistical methods and the conditions of their use.
Skills Students are able to use the statistics program to solve statistics problems and to interpret and depict the results
Personal Competence
Social Competence

Team Work, joined presentation of results

Autonomy

To understand and interpret the question and solve

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes None Written elaboration
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 minutes, 28 questions
Assignment for the Following Curricula Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Management: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation System Design: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation Intelligent Systems and Robotics: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Bio- and Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L1584: Applied Statistics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Michael Morlock
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

The goal is to introduce students to the basic statistical methods and their application to simple problems. The topics include:

•          Chi square test

•          Simple regression and correlation

•          Multiple regression and correlation

•          One way analysis of variance

•          Two way analysis of variance

•          Discriminant analysis

•          Analysis of categorial data

•          Chossing the appropriate statistical method

•          Determining critical sample sizes

Literature

Applied Regression Analysis and Multivariable Methods, 3rd Edition, David G. Kleinbaum Emory University, Lawrence L. Kupper University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Keith E. Muller University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Azhar Nizam Emory University, Published by Duxbury Press, CB © 1998, ISBN/ISSN: 0-534-20910-6

Course L1586: Applied Statistics
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Michael Morlock
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

The students receive a problem task, which they have to solve in small groups (n=5). They do have to collect their own data and work with them. The results have to be presented in an executive summary at the end of the course.

Literature

Selbst zu finden


Course L1585: Applied Statistics
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Michael Morlock
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

The different statistical tests are applied for the solution of realistic problems using actual data sets and the most common used commercial statistical software package (SPSS).

Literature

Student Solutions Manual for Kleinbaum/Kupper/Muller/Nizam's Applied Regression Analysis and Multivariable Methods, 3rd Edition, David G. Kleinbaum Emory University Lawrence L. Kupper University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Keith E. Muller University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Azhar Nizam Emory University, Published by Duxbury Press, Paperbound © 1998, ISBN/ISSN: 0-534-20913-0


Module M1334: BIO II: Biomaterials

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Biomaterials (L0593) Lecture 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Michael Morlock
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge of orthopedic and surgical techniques is recommended.

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students can describe the materials of the human body and the materials being used in medical engineering, and their fields of use.

Skills

The students can explain the advantages and disadvantages of different kinds of biomaterials.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to discuss issues related to materials being present or being used for replacements with student mates and the teachers.

Autonomy

The students are able to acquire information on their own. They can also judge the information with respect to its credibility.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Credit points 3
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Process Engineering and Biotechnology: Elective Compulsory
Materials Science: Specialisation Nano and Hybrid Materials: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Bio- and Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L0593: Biomaterials
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Michael Morlock
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

Topics to be covered include:

1.    Introduction (Importance, nomenclature, relations)

2.    Biological materials

2.1  Basics (components, testing methods)

2.2  Bone (composition, development, properties, influencing factors)

2.3  Cartilage (composition, development, structure, properties, influencing factors)

2.4  Fluids (blood, synovial fluid)

3     Biological structures

3.1  Menisci of the knee joint

3.2  Intervertebral discs

3.3  Teeth

3.4  Ligaments

3.5  Tendons

3.6  Skin

3.7  Nervs

3.8  Muscles

4.    Replacement materials

4.1  Basics (history, requirements, norms)

4.2  Steel (alloys, properties, reaction of the body)

4.3  Titan (alloys, properties, reaction of the body)

4.4  Ceramics and glas (properties, reaction of the body)

4.5  Plastics (properties of PMMA, HDPE, PET, reaction of the body)

4.6  Natural replacement materials

Knowledge of composition, structure, properties, function and changes/adaptations of biological and technical materials (which are used for replacements in-vivo). Acquisition of basics for theses work in the area of biomechanics.


Literature

Hastings G and Ducheyne P.: Natural and living biomaterials. Boca Raton: CRC Press, 1984.

Williams D.: Definitions in biomaterials. Oxford: Elsevier, 1987.

Hastings G.: Mechanical properties of biomaterials: proceedings held at Keele University, September 1978. New York: Wiley, 1998.

Black J.: Orthopaedic biomaterials in research and practice. New York: Churchill Livingstone, 1988.

Park J.  Biomaterials: an introduction. New York: Plenum Press, 1980.

Wintermantel, E. und Ha, S.-W : Biokompatible Werkstoffe und Bauweisen. Berlin, Springer, 1996.


Module M0548: Bioelectromagnetics: Principles and Applications

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Bioelectromagnetics: Principles and Applications (L0371) Lecture 3 5
Bioelectromagnetics: Principles and Applications (L0373) Recitation Section (small) 2 1
Module Responsible Prof. Christian Schuster
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic principles of physics


Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students can explain the basic principles, relationships, and methods of bioelectromagnetics, i.e. the quantification and application of electromagnetic fields in biological tissue. They can define and exemplify the most important physical phenomena and order them corresponding to wavelength and frequency of the fields. They can give an overview over measurement and numerical techniques for characterization of electromagnetic fields in practical applications . They can give examples for therapeutic and diagnostic utilization of electromagnetic fields in medical technology.


Skills

Students know how to apply various methods to characterize the behavior of electromagnetic fields in biological tissue.  In order to do this they can relate to and make use of the elementary solutions of Maxwell’s Equations. They are able to assess the most important effects that these models predict for biological tissue, they can order the effects corresponding to wavelength and frequency, respectively, and they can analyze them in a quantitative way. They are able to develop validation strategies for their predictions. They are able to evaluate the effects of electromagnetic fields for therapeutic and diagnostic applications and make an appropriate choice.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to work together on subject related tasks in small groups. They are able to present their results effectively in English (e.g. during small group exercises).


Autonomy

Students are capable to gather information from subject related, professional publications and relate that information to the context of the lecture. They are able to make a connection between their knowledge obtained in this lecture with the content of other lectures (e.g. theory of electromagnetic fields, fundamentals of electrical engineering / physics). They can communicate problems and effects in the field of bioelectromagnetics in English.


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes None Presentation
Examination Oral exam
Examination duration and scale 45 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Microwave Engineering, Optics, and Electromagnetic Compatibility: Elective Compulsory
Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Electrical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Bio- and Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L0371: Bioelectromagnetics: Principles and Applications
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 5
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 108, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Christian Schuster
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

- Fundamental properties of electromagnetic fields (phenomena)

- Mathematical description of electromagnetic fields (Maxwell’s Equations)

- Electromagnetic properties of biological tissue

- Principles of energy absorption in biological tissue, dosimetry

- Numerical methods for the computation of electromagnetic fields (especially FDTD)

- Measurement techniques for characterization of electromagnetic fields

- Behavior of electromagnetic fields of low frequency in biological tissue

- Behavior of electromagnetic fields of medium frequency in biological tissue

- Behavior of electromagnetic fields of high frequency in biological tissue

- Behavior of electromagnetic fields of very high frequency in biological tissue

- Diagnostic applications of electromagnetic fields in medical technology

- Therapeutic applications of electromagnetic fields in medical technology

- The human body as a generator of electromagnetic fields


Literature

- C. Furse, D. Christensen, C. Durney, "Basic Introduction to Bioelectromagnetics", CRC (2009)

- A. Vorst, A. Rosen, Y. Kotsuka, "RF/Microwave Interaction with Biological Tissues", Wiley (2006)

- S. Grimnes, O. Martinsen, "Bioelectricity and Bioimpedance Basics", Academic Press (2008)

- F. Barnes, B. Greenebaum, "Bioengineering and Biophysical Aspects of Electromagnetic Fields", CRC (2006)


Course L0373: Bioelectromagnetics: Principles and Applications
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 2, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Christian Schuster
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0921: Electronic Circuits for Medical Applications

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Electronic Circuits for Medical Applications (L0696) Lecture 2 3
Electronic Circuits for Medical Applications (L1056) Recitation Section (small) 1 2
Electronic Circuits for Medical Applications (L1408) Practical Course 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Matthias Kuhl
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Fundamentals of electrical engineering
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
  • Students can explain the basic functionality of the information transfer by the central nervous system
  • Students are able to explain the build-up of an action potential and its propagation along an axon
  • Students can exemplify the communication between neurons and electronic devices
  • Students can describe the special features of low-noise amplifiers for medical applications
  • Students can explain the functions of prostheses, e. g. an artificial hand
  • Students are able to discuss the potential and limitations of cochlea implants and artificial eyes


Skills
  • Students can  calculate the  time dependent voltage behavior of an action potential
  • Students can give scenarios for further improvement of low-noise and low-power signal acquisition.
  • Students  can develop the block diagrams of prosthetic systems
  • Students can define the building blocks of electronic systems for an articifial eye.


Personal Competence
Social Competence
  • Students are trained to solve problems in the field of medical electronics in teams together with experts with different professional background.
  • Students are able to recognize their specific limitations, so that they can ask for assistance to the right time.
  • Students can document their work in a clear manner and communicate their results in a way that others can be involved whenever it is necessary


Autonomy
  • Students are able to realistically judge the status of their knowledge and to define actions for improvements when necessary.
  • Students can break down their work in appropriate work packages and schedule their work in a realistic way.
  • Students can handle the complex data structures of bioelectrical experiments without needing support.
  • Students are able to act in a responsible manner in all cases and situations of experimental work.


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes None Subject theoretical and practical work
No None Excercises
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Elective Compulsory
Microelectronics and Microsystems: Specialisation Microelectronics Complements: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Bio- and Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L0696: Electronic Circuits for Medical Applications
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Matthias Kuhl
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Market for medical instruments
  • Membrane potential, action potential, sodium-potassium pump
  • Information transfer by the central nervous system
  • Interface tissue - electrode
  • Amplifiers for medical applications, analog-digital converters
  • Examples for electronic implants
  • Artificial eye, cochlea implant



Literature

Kim E. Barret, Susan M. Barman, Scott Boitano and Heddwen L. Brooks

Ganong‘s Review of Medical Physiology, 24nd Edition, McGraw Hill Lange, 2010

Tier- und Humanphysiologie: Eine Einführung von Werner A. Müller (Author), Stephan Frings (Author), 657 p.,  4. editions, Springer, 2009

Robert F. Schmidt (Editor), Hans-Georg Schaible (Editor)

Neuro- und Sinnesphysiologie (Springer-Lehrbuch) (Paper back), 488 p., Springer, 2006, 5. Edition, currently online only
Russell K. Hobbie, Bradley J. Roth, Intermediate Physics for Medicine and Biology, Springer, 4th ed., 616 p., 2007

Vorlesungen der Universität Heidelberg zur Tier- und Humanphysiologie: http://www.sinnesphysiologie.de/gruvo03/gruvoin.htm

Internet: http://butler.cc.tut.fi/~malmivuo/bem/bembook/


Course L1056: Electronic Circuits for Medical Applications
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Matthias Kuhl
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L1408: Electronic Circuits for Medical Applications
Typ Practical Course
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Matthias Kuhl
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Market for medical instruments
  • Membrane potential, action potential, sodium-potassium pump
  • Information transfer by the central nervous system
  • Interface tissue - electrode
  • Amplifiers for medical applications, analog-digital converters
  • Examples for electronic implants
  • Artificial eye, cochlea implant
Literature

Kim E. Barret, Susan M. Barman, Scott Boitano and Heddwen L. Brooks

Ganong‘s Review of Medical Physiology, 24nd Edition, McGraw Hill Lange, 2010

Tier- und Humanphysiologie: Eine Einführung von Werner A. Müller (Author), Stephan Frings (Author), 657 p.,  4. editions, Springer, 2009

Robert F. Schmidt (Editor), Hans-Georg Schaible (Editor)

Neuro- und Sinnesphysiologie (Springer-Lehrbuch) (Paper back), 488 p., Springer, 2006, 5. Edition, currently online only
Russell K. Hobbie, Bradley J. Roth, Intermediate Physics for Medicine and Biology, Springer, 4th ed., 616 p., 2007

Vorlesungen der Universität Heidelberg zur Tier- und Humanphysiologie: http://www.sinnesphysiologie.de/gruvo03/gruvoin.htm

Internet: http://butler.cc.tut.fi/~malmivuo/bem/bembook/

Module M1302: Applied Humanoid Robotics

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Applied Humanoid Robotics (L1794) Project-/problem-based Learning 6 6
Module Responsible Patrick Göttsch
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Object oriented programming; algorithms and data structures
  • Introduction to control systems
  • Control systems theory and design
  • Mechanics
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
  • Students can explain humanoid robots.
  • Students can explain the basic concepts, relationships and methods of forward- and inverse kinematics
  • Students learn to apply basic control concepts for different tasks in humanoid robotics.
Skills
  • Students can implement models for humanoid robotic systems in Matlab and C++, and use these models for robot motion or other tasks.
  • They are capable of using models in Matlab for simulation and testing these models if necessary with C++ code on the real robot system.
  • They are capable of selecting methods for solving abstract problems, for which no standard methods are available, and apply it successfully.
Personal Competence
Social Competence
  • Students can develop joint solutions in mixed teams and present these.
  • They can provide appropriate feedback to others, and  constructively handle feedback on their own results
Autonomy
  • Students are able to obtain required information from provided literature sources, and to put in into the context of the lecture.
  • They can independently define tasks and apply the appropriate means to solve them.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written elaboration
Examination duration and scale 5-10 pages
Assignment for the Following Curricula Computer Science: Specialisation II: Intelligence Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Control and Power Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation Intelligent Systems and Robotics: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Bio- and Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Robotics and Computer Science: Elective Compulsory
Course L1794: Applied Humanoid Robotics
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 6
CP 6
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Lecturer Patrick Göttsch
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe/SoSe
Content
  • Fundamentals of kinematics
  • Static and dynamic stability of humanoid robotic systems
  • Combination of different software environments (Matlab, C++, etc.)
  • Introduction to the necessary  software frameworks
  • Team project
  • Presentation and Demonstration of intermediate and final results
Literature
  • B. Siciliano, O. Khatib. "Handbook of Robotics. Part A: Robotics Foundations", Springer (2008)

Module M0811: Medical Imaging Systems

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Medical Imaging Systems (L0819) Lecture 4 6
Module Responsible Dr. Michael Grass
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge none
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students can:

  • Describe the system configuration and components of the main clinical imaging systems;
  • Explain how the system components and the overall system of the imaging systems function;
  • Explain and apply the physical processes that make imaging possible and use with the fundamental physical equations; 
  • Name and describe the physical effects required to generate image contrasts; 
  • Explain how spatial and temporal resolution can be influenced and how to characterize the images generated;
  • Explain which image reconstruction methods are used to generate images;

Describe and explain the main clinical uses of the different systems.

Skills

Students are able to: 

  • Explain the physical processes of images and assign to the systems the basic mathematical or physical equations required;
    • Calculate the parameters of imaging systems using the mathematical or physical equations;
    • Determine the influence of different system components on the spatial and temporal resolution of imaging systems;
    • Explain the importance of different imaging systems for a number of clinical applications;

Select a suitable imaging system for an application.

Personal Competence
Social Competence none
Autonomy

Students can:

  • Understand which physical effects are used in medical imaging;
  • Decide independently for which clinical issue a measuring system can be used.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Bio- and Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L0819: Medical Imaging Systems
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 4
CP 6
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Lecturer Dr. Michael Grass, Dr. Tim Nielsen, Dr. Sven Prevrhal, Frank Michael Weber
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
Literature

Primary book:

1. P. Suetens, "Fundamentals of Medical Imaging", Cambridge Press

Secondary books:

- A. Webb, "Introduction to Biomedical Imaging", IEEE Press 2003.

- W.R. Hendee and E.R. Ritenour, "Medical Imaging Physics", Wiley-Liss, New York, 2002.

- H. Morneburg (Edt), "Bildgebende Systeme für die medizinische Diagnostik", Erlangen: Siemens Publicis MCD Verlag, 1995.

- O. Dössel, "Bildgebende Verfahren in der Medizin", Springer Verlag Berlin, 2000.

Module M1335: BIO II: Artificial Joint Replacement

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Artificial Joint Replacement (L1306) Lecture 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Michael Morlock
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge of orthopedic and surgical techniques is recommended.

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students can name the different kinds of artificial limbs.

Skills

The students can explain the advantages and disadvantages of different kinds of endoprotheses.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to discuss issues related to endoprothese with student mates and the teachers.

Autonomy

The students are able to acquire information on their own. They can also judge the information with respect to its credibility.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Credit points 3
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Process Engineering and Biotechnology: Elective Compulsory
Materials Science: Specialisation Nano and Hybrid Materials: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Elective Compulsory
Orientation Studies: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Bio- and Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L1306: Artificial Joint Replacement
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Michael Morlock
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

Inhalt (deutsch)

1.  EINLEITUNG (Bedeutung, Ziel, Grundlagen, allg. Geschichte des künstlichen Gelenker-satzes)

2.  FUNKTIONSANALYSE (Der menschliche Gang, die menschliche Arbeit, die sportliche Aktivität)

3.  DAS HÜFTGELENK (Anatomie, Biomechanik, Gelenkersatz Schaftseite und Pfannenseite, Evolution der Implantate)

4.  DAS KNIEGELENK (Anatomie, Biomechanik, Bandersatz, Gelenkersatz femorale, tibiale und patelläre Komponenten)

5.  DER FUß (Anatomie, Biomechanik, Gelen-kersatz, orthopädische Verfahren)

6.  DIE SCHULTER (Anatomie, Biomechanik, Gelenkersatz)

7.  DER ELLBOGEN (Anatomie, Biomechanik, Gelenkersatz)

8.  DIE HAND (Anatomie, Biomechanik, Ge-lenkersatz)

9.  TRIBOLOGIE NATÜRLICHER UND KÜNST-LICHER GELENKE (Korrosion, Reibung, Verschleiß)

Literature

Literatur:

Kapandji, I..: Funktionelle Anatomie der Gelenke (Band 1-4), Enke Verlag, Stuttgart, 1984.

Nigg, B., Herzog, W.: Biomechanics of the musculo-skeletal system, John Wiley&Sons, New York 1994

Nordin, M., Frankel, V.: Basic Biomechanics of the Musculoskeletal System, Lea&Febiger, Philadelphia, 1989.

Czichos, H.: Tribologiehandbuch, Vieweg, Wiesbaden, 2003.

Sobotta und Netter für Anatomie der Gelenke

Module M0630: Robotics and Navigation in Medicine

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Robotics and Navigation in Medicine (L0335) Lecture 2 3
Robotics and Navigation in Medicine (L0338) Project Seminar 2 2
Robotics and Navigation in Medicine (L0336) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Alexander Schlaefer
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • principles of math (algebra, analysis/calculus)
  • principles of programming, e.g., in Java or C++
  • solid R or Matlab skills
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students can explain kinematics and tracking systems in clinical contexts and illustrate systems and their components in detail. Systems can be evaluated with respect to collision detection and  safety and regulations. Students can assess typical systems regarding design and  limitations.

Skills

The students are able to design and evaluate navigation systems and robotic systems for medical applications.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students discuss the results of other groups, provide helpful feedback and can incoorporate feedback into their work.

Autonomy

The students can reflect their knowledge and document the results of their work. They can present the results in an appropriate manner.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes 10 % Written elaboration
Yes 10 % Presentation
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula Computer Science: Specialisation II: Intelligence Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Electrical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Process Engineering and Biotechnology: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation Intelligent Systems and Robotics: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Bio- and Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L0335: Robotics and Navigation in Medicine
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Alexander Schlaefer
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

- kinematics
- calibration
- tracking systems
- navigation and image guidance
- motion compensation
The seminar extends and complements the contents of the lecture with respect to recent research results.


Literature

Spong et al.: Robot Modeling and Control, 2005
Troccaz: Medical Robotics, 2012
Further literature will be given in the lecture.

Course L0338: Robotics and Navigation in Medicine
Typ Project Seminar
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Alexander Schlaefer
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L0336: Robotics and Navigation in Medicine
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Alexander Schlaefer
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1182: Technical Elective Course for TMBMS (according to Subject Specific Regulations)

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Module Responsible Prof. Robert Seifried
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge see FSPO
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge see FSPO
Skills see FSPO
Personal Competence
Social Competence see FSPO
Autonomy see FSPO
Workload in Hours Depends on choice of courses
Credit points 6
Assignment for the Following Curricula Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Aircraft Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Materials Science: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Bio- and Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Robotics and Computer Science: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Simulation Technology: Elective Compulsory

Module M1249: Medical Imaging

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Medical Imaging (L1694) Lecture 2 3
Medical Imaging (L1695) Recitation Section (small) 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Tobias Knopp
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Basic knowledge in linear algebra, numerics, and signal processing
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

After successful completion of the module, students are able to describe reconstruction methods for different tomographic imaging modalities such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. They know the necessary basics from the fields of signal processing and inverse problems and are familiar with both analytical and iterative image reconstruction methods. The students have a deepened knowledge of the imaging operators of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

Skills

The students are able to implement reconstruction methods and test them using tomographic measurement data. They can visualize the reconstructed images and evaluate the quality of their data and results. In addition, students can estimate the temporal complexity of imaging algorithms.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students can work on complex problems both independently and in teams. They can exchange ideas with each other and use their individual strengths to solve the problem.

Autonomy

Students are able to independently investigate a complex problem and assess which competencies are required to solve it. 

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Computer Science: Specialisation II: Intelligence Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Interdisciplinary Mathematics: Specialisation Computational Methods in Biomedical Imaging: Compulsory
Microelectronics and Microsystems: Specialisation Communication and Signal Processing: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Bio- and Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L1694: Medical Imaging
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Tobias Knopp
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Overview about different imaging methods
  • Signal processing
  • Inverse problems
  • Computed tomography
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Compressed Sensing
  • Magnetic particle imaging

Literature

Bildgebende Verfahren in der Medizin; O. Dössel; Springer, Berlin, 2000

Bildgebende Systeme für die medizinische Diagnostik; H. Morneburg (Hrsg.); Publicis MCD, München, 1995

Introduction to the Mathematics of Medical Imaging; C. L.Epstein; Siam, Philadelphia, 2008

Medical Image Processing, Reconstruction and Restoration; J. Jan; Taylor and Francis, Boca Raton, 2006

Principles of Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Z.-P. Liang and P. C. Lauterbur; IEEE Press, New York, 1999

Course L1695: Medical Imaging
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Tobias Knopp
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0746: Microsystem Engineering

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Microsystem Engineering (L0680) Lecture 2 4
Microsystem Engineering (L0682) Project-/problem-based Learning 2 2
Module Responsible Dr. rer. nat. Thomas Kusserow
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Basic courses in physics, mathematics and electric engineering
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students know about the most important technologies and materials of MEMS as well as their applications in sensors and actuators.

Skills

Students are able to analyze and describe the functional behaviour of MEMS components and to evaluate the potential of microsystems.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to solve specific problems alone or in a group and to present the results accordingly.

Autonomy

Students are able to acquire particular knowledge using specialized literature and to integrate and associate this knowledge with other fields.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
No 10 % Presentation
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 2h
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Electrical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Mechatronics: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Mechatronics: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation System Design: Elective Compulsory
Microelectronics and Microsystems: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Bio- and Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L0680: Microsystem Engineering
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 92, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. rer. nat. Thomas Kusserow
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

Object and goal of MEMS

Scaling Rules

Lithography

Film deposition

Structuring and etching

Energy conversion and force generation

Electromagnetic Actuators

Reluctance motors

Piezoelectric actuators, bi-metal-actuator

Transducer principles

Signal detection and signal processing

Mechanical and physical sensors

Acceleration sensor, pressure sensor

Sensor arrays

System integration

Yield, test and reliability

Literature

M. Kasper: Mikrosystementwurf, Springer (2000)

M. Madou: Fundamentals of Microfabrication, CRC Press (1997)

Course L0682: Microsystem Engineering
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. rer. nat. Thomas Kusserow
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

Examples of MEMS components

Layout consideration

Electric, thermal and mechanical behaviour

Design aspects

Literature

Wird in der Veranstaltung bekannt gegeben

Module M0623: Intelligent Systems in Medicine

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Intelligent Systems in Medicine (L0331) Lecture 2 3
Intelligent Systems in Medicine (L0334) Project Seminar 2 2
Intelligent Systems in Medicine (L0333) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Alexander Schlaefer
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • principles of math (algebra, analysis/calculus)
  • principles of stochastics
  • principles of programming, Java/C++ and R/Matlab
  • advanced programming skills
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students are able to analyze and solve clinical treatment planning and decision support problems using methods for search, optimization, and planning. They are able to explain methods for classification and their respective advantages and disadvantages in clinical contexts. The students can compare  different methods for representing medical knowledge. They can evaluate methods in the context of clinical data  and explain challenges due to the clinical nature of the data and its acquisition and due to privacy and safety requirements.

Skills

The students can give reasons for selecting and adapting methods for classification, regression, and prediction. They can assess the methods based on actual patient data and evaluate the implemented methods.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students discuss the results of other groups, provide helpful feedback and can incoorporate feedback into their work.

Autonomy

The students can reflect their knowledge and document the results of their work. They can present the results in an appropriate manner.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes 10 % Presentation
Yes 10 % Written elaboration
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula Computer Science: Specialisation II: Intelligence Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Interdisciplinary Mathematics: Specialisation Computational Methods in Biomedical Imaging: Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation Intelligent Systems and Robotics: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Bio- and Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L0331: Intelligent Systems in Medicine
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Alexander Schlaefer
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

- methods for search, optimization,  planning,  classification, regression and prediction in a clinical context
- representation of medical knowledge
- understanding challenges due to clinical and patient related data and data acquisition
The students will work in groups to apply the methods introduced during the lecture using problem based learning.


Literature

Russel & Norvig: Artificial Intelligence: a Modern Approach, 2012
Berner: Clinical Decision Support Systems: Theory and Practice, 2007
Greenes: Clinical Decision Support: The Road Ahead, 2007
Further literature will be given in the lecture


Course L0334: Intelligent Systems in Medicine
Typ Project Seminar
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Alexander Schlaefer
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L0333: Intelligent Systems in Medicine
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Alexander Schlaefer
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Specialization Energy Systems

The focus of the specialization „energy technology“ lies on the acquisition of knowledge and skills on an economically and ecologically sensible provision of electricity, heating and coooling on the basis of conventional and renewable energy systems. This is made possible by modules in the areas of fluid mechanics and ocean energy, solar energy, electric energy, heating technology, air conditioners, power plants, steam and Cogeneration and combustion technology electives. In addition, subjects in the Technical Supplement Course for TMBMS (according FSPO) are freely selectable.

Module M1235: Electrical Power Systems I: Introduction to Electrical Power Systems

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Electrical Power Systems I: Introduction to Electrical Power Systems (L1670) Lecture 3 4
Electrical Power Systems I: Introduction to Electrical Power Systems (L1671) Recitation Section (small) 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Christian Becker
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students are able to give an overview of conventional and modern electric power systems.  They can explain in detail and critically evaluate technologies of electric power generation, transmission, storage, and distribution as well as integration of equipment into electric power systems.

Skills

With completion of this module the students are able to apply the acquired skills in applications of the design, integration, development of electric power systems and to assess the results.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students can participate in specialized and interdisciplinary discussions, advance ideas and represent their own work results in front of others.

Autonomy

Students can independently tap knowledge of the emphasis of the lectures. 

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 - 150 minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula General Engineering Science (German program, 7 semester): Specialisation Electrical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
General Engineering Science (German program, 7 semester): Specialisation Green Technologies, Focus Renewable Energy: Elective Compulsory
Data Science: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Electrical Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Energy and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Energy Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy Systems: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
General Engineering Science (English program, 7 semester): Specialisation Electrical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Green Technologies: Energy, Water, Climate: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Computational Science and Engineering: Specialisation II. Mathematics & Engineering Science: Elective Compulsory
Renewable Energies: Core qualification: Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Course L1670: Electrical Power Systems I: Introduction to Electrical Power Systems
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Christian Becker
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • fundamentals and current development trends in electric power engineering 
  • tasks and history of electric power systems
  • symmetric three-phase systems
  • fundamentals and modelling of eletric power systems 
    • lines
    • transformers
    • synchronous machines
    • induction machines
    • loads and compensation
    • grid structures and substations 
  • fundamentals of energy conversion
    • electro-mechanical energy conversion
    • thermodynamics
    • power station technology
    • renewable energy conversion systems
  • steady-state network calculation
    • network modelling
    • load flow calculation
    • (n-1)-criterion
  • symmetric failure calculations, short-circuit power
  • control in networks and power stations
  • grid protection
  • grid planning
  • power economy fundamentals
Literature

K. Heuck, K.-D. Dettmann, D. Schulz: "Elektrische Energieversorgung", Vieweg + Teubner, 9. Auflage, 2013

A. J. Schwab: "Elektroenergiesysteme", Springer, 5. Auflage, 2017

R. Flosdorff: "Elektrische Energieverteilung" Vieweg + Teubner, 9. Auflage, 2008

Course L1671: Electrical Power Systems I: Introduction to Electrical Power Systems
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Christian Becker
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • fundamentals and current development trends in electric power engineering 
  • tasks and history of electric power systems
  • symmetric three-phase systems
  • fundamentals and modelling of eletric power systems 
    • lines
    • transformers
    • synchronous machines
    • induction machines
    • loads and compensation
    • grid structures and substations 
  • fundamentals of energy conversion
    • electro-mechanical energy conversion
    • thermodynamics
    • power station technology
    • renewable energy conversion systems
  • steady-state network calculation
    • network modelling
    • load flow calculation
    • (n-1)-criterion
  • symmetric failure calculations, short-circuit power
  • control in networks and power stations
  • grid protection
  • grid planning
  • power economy fundamentals
Literature

K. Heuck, K.-D. Dettmann, D. Schulz: "Elektrische Energieversorgung", Vieweg + Teubner, 9. Auflage, 2013

A. J. Schwab: "Elektroenergiesysteme", Springer, 5. Auflage, 2017

R. Flosdorff: "Elektrische Energieverteilung" Vieweg + Teubner, 9. Auflage, 2008

Module M0742: Thermal Energy Systems

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Thermal Engergy Systems (L0023) Lecture 3 5
Thermal Engergy Systems (L0024) Recitation Section (large) 1 1
Module Responsible NN
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Technical Thermodynamics I, II, Fluid Dynamics, Heat Transfer
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students know the different energy conversion stages and the difference between efficiency and annual efficiency. They have increased knowledge in heat and mass transfer, especially in regard to buildings and mobile applications. They are familiar with German energy saving code and other technical relevant rules. They know to differ different heating systems in the domestic and industrial area and how to control such heating systems. They are able to model a furnace and to calculate the transient temperatures in a furnace. They have the basic knowledge of emission formations in the flames of small burners  and how to conduct the flue gases into the atmosphere. They are able to model thermodynamic systems with object oriented languages.


Skills

Students are able to calculate the heating demand for different heating systems and to choose the suitable components. They are able to calculate a pipeline network and have the ability to perform simple planning tasks, regarding solar energy. They can write Modelica programs and can transfer research knowledge into practice. They are able to perform scientific work in the field of thermal engineering.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to discuss in small groups and develop an approach.

Autonomy

Students are able to define independently tasks, to get new knowledge from existing knowledge as well as to find ways to use the knowledge in practice.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Bioprocess Engineering: Specialisation A - General Bioprocess Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Energy Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy Systems: Specialisation Energy Systems: Compulsory
Energy Systems: Specialisation Marine Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Renewable Energies: Core qualification: Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Process Engineering: Specialisation Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L0023: Thermal Engergy Systems
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 5
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 108, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer NN
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

1. Introduction

2. Fundamentals of Thermal Engineering 2.1 Heat Conduction 2.2 Convection 2.3 Radiation 2.4 Heat transition 2.5 Combustion parameters 2.6 Electrical heating 2.7 Water vapor transport

3. Heating Systems 3.1 Warm water heating systems 3.2 Warm water supply 3.3 piping calculation 3.4 boilers, heat pumps, solar collectors 3.5 Air heating systems 3.6 radiative heating systems

4. Thermal traetment systems 4.1 Industrial furnaces 4.2 Melting furnaces 4.3 Drying plants 4.4 Emission control 4.5 Chimney calculation 4.6 Energy measuring

5. Laws and standards 5.1 Buildings 5.2 Industrial plants

Literature
  • Schmitz, G.: Klimaanlagen, Skript zur Vorlesung
  • VDI Wärmeatlas, 11. Auflage, Springer Verlag, Düsseldorf 2013
  • Herwig, H.; Moschallski, A.: Wärmeübertragung, Vieweg+Teubner Verlag, Wiesbaden 2009
  • Recknagel, H.;  Sprenger, E.; Schrammek, E.-R.: Taschenbuch für Heizung- und Klimatechnik 2013/2014, 76. Auflage, Deutscher Industrieverlag, 2013
Course L0024: Thermal Engergy Systems
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer NN
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1037: Steam Turbines in Energy, Environmental and Power Train Engineering

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Steam turbines in energy, environmental and Power Train Engineering (L1286) Lecture 3 5
Steam turbines in energy, environmental and Power Train Engineering (L1287) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Module Responsible Dr. Christian Scharfetter
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge


  • "Gas and Steam Power Plants"
  • "Technical Thermodynamics I & II"
  • "Fluid Mechanics"


Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

After successful completion of the module the students must be in a position to:

  • name and identify the various parts and constructive groups of steam turbines
  • describe and explain the key operating conditions for the application of steam turbines
  • classify different construction types and differentiate among steam turbines according to size and operating ranges
  • describe the thermodynamic processes and the constructive and operational repercussions resulting from the latter
  • calculate thermodynamically a turbine stage and a stage assembly
  • calculate or estimate and further evaluate sections of the turbine
  • outline diagrams describing the operating range and the constructive characteristics
  • investigate the constructive aspects and develop from the thermodynamic requirements the required construction characteristics
  • discuss and argue on the operation characteristics of different turbine types
  • evaluate thermodynamically the integration of different turbine designs in heat cycles.
Skills

In the module the students learn the fundamental approaches and methods for the design and operational evaluation of complex plant, and gain in particular confidence in seeking optimisations. They specifically:

  • obtain the ability to analyse the potential of various energy sources that can be utilised thermodynamically, from the energetic-economic and technical viewpoints
  • can evaluate the performance and technical limitations in using various energy sources, for supplying base load and balancing reserve power to the electricity grid
  • on the basis of the impact of power plant operation on the integrity of components, can describe the precautionary principles for damage prevention
  • can describe the key requirements for the Management and Design of Thermal Power Plants, based on the overriding demands imposed by various legislative frameworks.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

In the module the students learn:

  • to work together with others whilst seeking a solution
  • to assist each other in problem solving
  • to conduct discussions
  • to present work results
  • to work respectfully within the team.


Autonomy

In the module the students learn the independent working of a complex theme whilst considering various aspects. They also learn how to combine independent functions in a system.

The students become the ability to gain independently knowledge and transfer it also to new problem solving.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 180 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Energy and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Energy Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Course L1286: Steam turbines in energy, environmental and Power Train Engineering
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 5
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 108, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Dr. Christian Scharfetter
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Introduction
  • Construction Aspects of a Steam Turbine 
  • Energy Conversion in a Steam Turbine  
  • Construction Types of Steam Turbines 
  • Behaviour of Steam Turbines 
  • Sealing Systems for Steam Turbines 
  • Axial Thrust 
  • Regulation of Steam Turbines
  • Stiffness Calculation of the Blades
  • Blade and Rotor Oscillations 
  • Fundamentals of a Safe Steam Turbine Operation
  • Application in Conventional and Renewable Power Stations
  • Connection to thermal and electrical energy networks, interfaces
  • Conventional and regenerative power plant concepts, drive technology
  • Analysis of the global energy supply market
  • Applications in conventional and regenerative power plants
  • Different power plant concepts and their influence on the steam turbine (engine and gas turbine power plants with waste heat utilization, geothermal energy, solar thermal energy, biomass, biogas, waste incineration).
  • Classic combined heat and power generation as a combined product of the manufacturing industry
  • Impact of change in the energy market, operating profiles
  • Applications in drive technology
  • Operating and maintenance concepts

    The lecture will be deepened by means of examples, tasks and two excursions
Literature
  • Traupel, W.: Thermische Turbomaschinen. Berlin u. a., Springer (TUB HH: Signatur MSI-105) 
  • Menny, K.: Strömungsmaschinen: hydraulische und thermische Kraft- und Arbeitsmaschinen. Ausgabe: 5. Wiesbaden, Teubner, 2006 (TUB HH: Signatur MSI-121)
  • Bohl, W.: Aufbau und Wirkungsweise. Ausgabe 6. Würzburg, Vogel, 1994 (TUB HH: Signatur MSI-109)
  • Bohl, W.: Berechnung und Konstruktion. Ausgabe 6. Aufl. Würzburg, Vogel, 1999 (TUB HH: Signatur MSI-110)


Course L1287: Steam turbines in energy, environmental and Power Train Engineering
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Dr. Christian Scharfetter
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1182: Technical Elective Course for TMBMS (according to Subject Specific Regulations)

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Module Responsible Prof. Robert Seifried
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge see FSPO
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge see FSPO
Skills see FSPO
Personal Competence
Social Competence see FSPO
Autonomy see FSPO
Workload in Hours Depends on choice of courses
Credit points 6
Assignment for the Following Curricula Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Aircraft Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Materials Science: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Bio- and Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Robotics and Computer Science: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Simulation Technology: Elective Compulsory

Module M0512: Use of Solar Energy

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Energy Meteorology (L0016) Lecture 1 1
Energy Meteorology (L0017) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Collector Technology (L0018) Lecture 2 2
Solar Power Generation (L0015) Lecture 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Martin Kaltschmitt
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge none
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

With the completion of this module, students will be able to deal with technical foundations and current issues and problems in the field of solar energy and explain and evaulate these critically in consideration of the prior curriculum and current subject specific issues. In particular they can professionally describe the processes within a solar cell and explain the specific features of application of solar modules. Furthermore, they can provide an overview of the collector technology in solar thermal systems.

Skills

Students can apply the acquired theoretical foundations of exemplary energy systems using solar radiation. In this context, for example they can assess and evaluate potential and constraints of solar energy systems with respect to different geographical assumptions. They are able to dimension solar energy systems in consideration of technical aspects and given assumptions. Using module-comprehensive knowledge students can evalute the economic and ecologic conditions of these systems. They can select calculation methods within the radiation theory for these topics. 


Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to discuss issues in the thematic fields in the renewable energy sector addressed within the module.

Autonomy

Students can independently exploit sources and acquire the particular knowledge about the subject area with respect to emphasis fo the lectures. Furthermore, with the assistance of lecturers, they can discrete use calculation methods for analysing and dimensioning solar energy systems. Based on this procedure they can concrete assess their specific learning level and can consequently define the further workflow. 

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 3 hours written exam
Assignment for the Following Curricula Energy and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy Systems: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Renewable Energy: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Renewable Energies: Core qualification: Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Process Engineering: Specialisation Environmental Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L0016: Energy Meteorology
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Dr. Volker Matthias, Dr. Beate Geyer
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Introduction: radiation source Sun, Astronomical Foundations, Fundamentals of radiation
  • Structure of the atmosphere
  • Properties and laws of radiation
    • Polarization
    • Radiation quantities 
    • Planck's radiation law
    • Wien's displacement law
    • Stefan-Boltzmann law
    • Kirchhoff's law
    • Brightness temperature
    • Absorption, reflection, transmission
  • Radiation balance, global radiation, energy balance
  • Atmospheric extinction
  • Mie and Rayleigh scattering
  • Radiative transfer
  • Optical effects in the atmosphere
  • Calculation of the sun and calculate radiation on inclined surfaces
Literature
  • Helmut Kraus: Die Atmosphäre der Erde
  • Hans Häckel: Meteorologie
  • Grant W. Petty: A First Course in Atmosheric Radiation
  • Martin Kaltschmitt, Wolfgang Streicher, Andreas Wiese: Renewable Energy
  • Alexander Löw, Volker Matthias: Skript Optik Strahlung Fernerkundung


Course L0017: Energy Meteorology
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Dr. Beate Geyer
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L0018: Collector Technology
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Agis Papadopoulos
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Introduction: Energy demand and application of solar energy.
  • Heat transfer in the solar thermal energy: conduction, convection, radiation.
  • Collectors: Types, structure, efficiency, dimensioning, concentrated systems.
  • Energy storage: Requirements, types.
  • Passive solar energy: components and systems.
  • Solar thermal low temperature systems: collector variants, construction, calculation.
  • Solar thermal high temperature systems: Classification of solar power plants construction.
  • Solar air conditioning.
Literature
  • Vorlesungsskript.
  • Kaltschmitt, Streicher und Wiese (Hrsg.). Erneuerbare Energien: Systemtechnik, Wirtschaftlichkeit, Umweltaspekte, 5. Auflage, Springer, 2013.
  • Stieglitz und Heinzel .Thermische Solarenergie: Grundlagen, Technologie, Anwendungen. Springer, 2012.
  • Von Böckh und Wetzel. Wärmeübertragung: Grundlagen und Praxis, Springer, 2011.
  • Baehr und Stephan. Wärme- und Stoffübertragung. Springer, 2009.
  • de Vos. Thermodynamics of solar energy conversion. Wiley-VCH, 2008.
  • Mohr, Svoboda und Unger. Praxis solarthermischer Kraftwerke. Springer, 1999.


Course L0015: Solar Power Generation
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Martin Schlecht, Prof. Alf Mews, Roman Fritsches, Paola Pignatelli
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

Photovoltaics:

  1. Introduction
  2. Primary energies and consumption, available solar energy
  3. Physics of the ideal solar cell
  4. Light absorption, PN transition, characteristic sizes of the solar cell, efficiency
  5. Physics of the real solar cell
  6. Charge carrier recombination, characteristic curves, barrier layer recombination, equivalent circuit diagram
  7. Increasing efficiency
  8. Methods for increasing the quantum yield and reducing recombination
  9. Hetero- and tandem structures
  10. Heterojunction, Schottky, electrochemical, MIS and SIS cell, tandem cell
  11. Concentrator cells
  12. Concentrator optics and tracking systems, concentrator cells
  13. Technology and properties: solar cell types, manufacturing, monocrystalline silicon and gallium arsenide, polycrystalline silicon and silicon thin film cells, thin film cells on carriers (amorphous silicon, CIS, electrochemical cells)
  14. Modules
  15. Switches

Concentrating solar power plants:

  1. Introduction
  2. Point focused technologies
  3. Line focused technologies
  4. Design of CSP projects
Literature
  • A. Götzberger, B. Voß, J. Knobloch: Sonnenenergie: Photovoltaik, Teubner Studienskripten, Stuttgart, 1995
  • A. Götzberger: Sonnenenergie: Photovoltaik : Physik und Technologie der Solarzelle, Teubner Stuttgart, 1994
  • H.-J. Lewerenz, H. Jungblut: Photovoltaik, Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 1995
  • A. Götzberger: Photovoltaic solar energy generation, Springer, Berlin, 2005
  • C. Hu, R. M. White: Solar CelIs, Mc Graw HilI, New York, 1983
  • H.-G. Wagemann: Grundlagen der photovoltaischen Energiewandlung: Solarstrahlung, Halbleitereigenschaften und Solarzellenkonzepte, Teubner, Stuttgart, 1994
  • R. J. van Overstraeten, R.P. Mertens: Physics, technology and use of photovoltaics, Adam Hilger Ltd, Bristol and Boston, 1986
  • B. O. Seraphin: Solar energy conversion Topics of applied physics V 01 31, Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 1995
  • P. Würfel: Physics of Solar cells, Principles and new concepts, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim 2005
  • U. Rindelhardt: Photovoltaische Stromversorgung, Teubner-Reihe Umwelt, Stuttgart 2001
  • V. Quaschning: Regenerative Energiesysteme, Hanser, München, 2003
  • G. Schmitz: Regenerative Energien, Ringvorlesung TU Hamburg-Harburg 1994/95, Institut für Energietechnik

Module M0721: Air Conditioning

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Air Conditioning (L0594) Lecture 3 5
Air Conditioning (L0595) Recitation Section (large) 1 1
Module Responsible NN
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Technical Thermodynamics I, II, Fluid Dynamics, Heat Transfer
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students know the different kinds of air conditioning systems for buildings and mobile applications and how these systems are controlled. They are familiar with the change of state of humid air and are able to draw the state changes in a h1+x,x-diagram. They are able to calculate the minimum airflow needed for hygienic conditions in rooms and can choose suitable filters. They know the basic flow pattern in rooms and are able to calculate the air velocity in rooms with the help of simple methods. They know the principles  to calculate an air duct network. They know the different possibilities to produce cold and are able to draw these processes into suitable thermodynamic diagrams. They know the criteria for the assessment of refrigerants.


Skills

Students are able to configure air condition systems for buildings and mobile applications.  They are able to calculate an air duct network and have the ability to perform simple planning tasks, regarding natural heat sources and heat sinks. They can transfer research knowledge into practice. They are able to perform scientific work in the field of air conditioning.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to discuss in small groups and develop an approach.

    


Autonomy

Students are able to define independently tasks, to get new knowledge from existing knowledge as well as to find ways to use the knowledge in practice.


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Energy and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy Systems: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Energy Systems: Specialisation Marine Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Aviation Systems: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Process Engineering: Specialisation Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L0594: Air Conditioning
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 5
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 108, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer NN
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

1. Overview

1.1 Kinds of air conditioning systems

1.2 Ventilating

1.3 Function of an air condition system

2. Thermodynamic processes

2.1 Psychrometric chart

2.2 Mixer preheater, heater

2.3 Cooler

2.4 Humidifier

2.5 Air conditioning process in a Psychrometric chart

2.6 Desiccant assisted air conditioning

3. Calculation of heating and cooling loads

3.1 Heating loads

3.2 Cooling loads

3.3 Calculation of inner cooling load

3.4 Calculation of outer cooling load

4. Ventilating systems

4.1 Fresh air demand

4.2 Air flow in rooms

4.3 Calculation of duct systems

4.4 Fans

4.5 Filters

5. Refrigeration systems

5.1. compression chillers

5.2Absorption chillers

Literature
  • Schmitz, G.: Klimaanlagen, Skript zur Vorlesung
  • VDI Wärmeatlas, 11. Auflage, Springer Verlag, Düsseldorf 2013
  • Herwig, H.; Moschallski, A.: Wärmeübertragung, Vieweg+Teubner Verlag, Wiesbaden 2009
  • Recknagel, H.;  Sprenger, E.; Schrammek, E.-R.: Taschenbuch für Heizung- und Klimatechnik 2013/2014, 76. Auflage, Deutscher Industrieverlag, 2013



Course L0595: Air Conditioning
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer NN
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0906: Numerical Simulation and Lagrangian Transport

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Lagrangian transport in turbulent flows (L2301) Lecture 2 3
Computational Fluid Dynamics - Exercises in OpenFoam (L1375) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Computational Fluid Dynamics in Process Engineering (L1052) Lecture 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Michael Schlüter
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Mathematics I-IV
  • Basic knowledge in Fluid Mechanics
  • Basic knowledge in chemical thermodynamics
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

After successful completion of the module the students are able to

  • explain the the basic principles of statistical thermodynamics (ensembles, simple systems) 
  • describe the main approaches in classical Molecular Modeling (Monte Carlo, Molecular Dynamics) in various ensembles
  • discuss examples of computer programs in detail,
  • evaluate the application of numerical simulations,
  • list the possible start and boundary conditions for a numerical simulation.
Skills

The students are able to:

  • set up computer programs for solving simple problems by Monte Carlo or molecular dynamics,
  • solve problems by molecular modeling,
  • set up a numerical grid,
  • perform a simple numerical simulation with OpenFoam,
  • evaluate the result of a numerical simulation.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to

  • develop joint solutions in mixed teams and present them in front of the other students,
  • to collaborate in a team and to reflect their own contribution toward it.




Autonomy

The students are able to:

  • evaluate their learning progress and to define the following steps of learning on that basis,
  • evaluate possible consequences for their profession.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Oral exam
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Bioprocess Engineering: Specialisation A - General Bioprocess Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Bioprocess Engineering: Specialisation B - Industrial Bioprocess Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering: Specialisation Chemical Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering: Specialisation General Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Simulation Technology: Elective Compulsory
Process Engineering: Specialisation Chemical Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Process Engineering: Specialisation Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L2301: Lagrangian transport in turbulent flows
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Alexandra von Kameke
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

Contents

- Common variables and terms for characterizing turbulence (energy spectra, energy cascade, etc.)

- An overview of Lagrange analysis methods and experiments in fluid mechanics

- Critical examination of the concept of turbulence and turbulent structures.

-Calculation of the transport of ideal fluid elements and associated analysis methods (absolute and relative diffusion, Lagrangian Coherent Structures, etc.)

- Implementation of a Runge-Kutta 4th-order in Matlab

- Introduction to particle integration using ODE solver from Matlab

- Problems from turbulence research

- Application analytical methods with Matlab.


Structure:

- 14 units a 2x45 min. 

- 10 units lecture

- 4 Units Matlab Exercise- Go through the exercises Matlab, Peer2Peer? Explain solutions to your colleague


Learning goals:

Students receive very specific, in-depth knowledge from modern turbulence research and transport analysis. → Knowledge

The students learn to classify the acquired knowledge, they study approaches to further develop the knowledge themselves and to relate different data sources to each other. → Knowledge, skills

The students are trained in the personal competence to independently delve into and research a scientific topic. → Independence

Matlab exercises in small groups during the lecture and guided Peer2Peer discussion rounds train communication skills in complex situations. The mixture of precise language and intuitive understanding is learnt. → Knowledge, social competence


Required knowledge:

Fluid mechanics 1 and 2 advantageous

Programming knowledge advantageous



Literature

Bakunin, Oleg G. (2008): Turbulence and Diffusion. Scaling Versus Equations. Berlin [u. a.]: Springer Verlag.

Bourgoin, Mickaël; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Xu, Haitao; Berg, Jacob; Bodenschatz, Eberhard (2006): The role of pair dispersion in turbulent flow. In: Science (New York, N.Y.) 311 (5762), S. 835-838. DOI: 10.1126/science.1121726.

Davidson, P. A. (2015): Turbulence. An introduction for scientists and engineers. Second edition. Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press.

Graff, L. S.; Guttu, S.; LaCasce, J. H. (2015): Relative Dispersion in the Atmosphere from Reanalysis Winds. In: J. Atmos. Sci. 72 (7), S. 2769-2785. DOI: 10.1175/JAS-D-14-0225.1.

Grigoriev, Roman (2011): Transport and Mixing in Laminar Flows. Weinheim, Germany: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

Haller, George (2015): Lagrangian Coherent Structures. In: Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 47 (1), S. 137-162. DOI: 10.1146/annurev-fluid-010313-141322.

Kameke, A. von; Huhn, F.; Fernández-García, G.; Muñuzuri, A. P.; Pérez-Muñuzuri, V. (2010): Propagation of a chemical wave front in a quasi-two-dimensional superdiffusive flow. In: Physical review. E, Statistical, nonlinear, and soft matter physics 81 (6 Pt 2), S. 66211. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.81.066211.

Kameke, A. von; Huhn, F.; Fernández-García, G.; Muñuzuri, A. P.; Pérez-Muñuzuri, V. (2011): Double cascade turbulence and Richardson dispersion in a horizontal fluid flow induced by Faraday waves. In: Physical review letters 107 (7), S. 74502. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.074502.

Kameke, A.v.; Kastens, S.; Rüttinger, S.; Herres-Pawlis, S.; Schlüter, M. (2019): How coherent structures dominate the residence time in a bubble wake: An experimental example. In: Chemical Engineering Science 207, S. 317-326. DOI: 10.1016/j.ces.2019.06.033.

Klages, Rainer; Radons, Günter; Sokolov, Igor M. (2008): Anomalous Transport: Wiley.

LaCasce, J. H. (2008): Statistics from Lagrangian observations. In: Progress in Oceanography 77 (1), S. 1-29. DOI: 10.1016/j.pocean.2008.02.002.

Neufeld, Zoltán; Hernández-García, Emilio (2009): Chemical and Biological Processes in Fluid Flows: PUBLISHED BY IMPERIAL COLLEGE PRESS AND DISTRIBUTED BY WORLD SCIENTIFIC PUBLISHING CO.

Onu, K.; Huhn, F.; Haller, G. (2015): LCS Tool: A computational platform for Lagrangian coherent structures. In: Journal of Computational Science 7, S. 26-36. DOI: 10.1016/j.jocs.2014.12.002.

Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Xu, Haitao; Bourgoin, Mickaël; Bodenschatz, Eberhard (2006): An experimental study of turbulent relative dispersion models. In: New J. Phys. 8 (6), S. 109. DOI: 10.1088/1367-2630/8/6/109.

Pope, Stephen B. (2000): Turbulent Flows. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Rivera, M. K.; Ecke, R. E. (2005): Pair dispersion and doubling time statistics in two-dimensional turbulence. In: Physical review letters 95 (19), S. 194503. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.95.194503.

Vallis, Geoffrey K. (2010): Atmospheric and oceanic fluid dynamics. Fundamentals and large-scale circulation. 5. printing. Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press.

Course L1375: Computational Fluid Dynamics - Exercises in OpenFoam
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Michael Schlüter
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • generation of numerical grids with a common grid generator
  • selection of models and boundary conditions
  • basic numerical simulation with OpenFoam within the TUHH CIP-Pool


Literature OpenFoam Tutorials (StudIP)
Course L1052: Computational Fluid Dynamics in Process Engineering
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Michael Schlüter
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Introduction into partial differential equations
  • Basic equations
  • Boundary conditions and grids
  • Numerical methods
  • Finite difference method
  • Finite volume method
  • Time discretisation and stability
  • Population balance
  • Multiphase Systems
  • Modeling of Turbulent Flows
  • Exercises: Stability Analysis 
  • Exercises: Example on CFD - analytically/numerically 
Literature

Paschedag A.R.: CFD in der Verfahrenstechnik: Allgemeine Grundlagen und mehrphasige Anwendungen, Wiley-VCH, 2004 ISBN 3-527-30994-2.

Ferziger, J.H.; Peric, M.: Numerische Strömungsmechanik. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2008, ISBN: 3540675868.

Ferziger, J.H.; Peric, M.: Computational Methods for Fluid Dynamics. Springer, 2002, ISBN 3-540-42074-6


Module M0511: Electrical Energy from Solar Radiation and Wind Power

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Sustainability Management (L0007) Lecture 2 1
Hydro Power Use (L0013) Lecture 1 1
Wind Turbine Plants (L0011) Lecture 2 3
Wind Energy Use - Focus Offshore (L0012) Lecture 1 1
Module Responsible Dr. Isabel Höfer
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Module: Technical Thermodynamics I,

Module: Technical Thermodynamics II,

Module: Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

By ending this module students can explain in detail knowledge of wind turbines with a particular focus of wind energy use in offshore conditions and can critical comment these aspects in consideration of current developments. Furthermore, they are able to describe fundamentally the use of water power to generate electricity. The students reproduce and explain the basic procedure in the implementation of renewable energy projects in countries outside Europe.

Through active discussions of various topics within the seminar of the module, students improve their understanding and the application of the theoretical background and are thus able to transfer what they have learned in practice.

Skills  Students are able to apply the acquired theoretical foundations on exemplary water or wind power systems and evaluate and assess technically the resulting relationships in the context of dimensioning and operation of these energy systems. They can in compare critically the special procedure for the implementation of renewable energy projects in countries outside Europe with the in principle applied approach in Europe and can apply this procedure on exemplary theoretical projects.

Personal Competence
Social Competence  Students can discuss scientific tasks subjet-specificly and multidisciplinary within a seminar.

Autonomy

Students can independently exploit sources in the context of the emphasis of the lecture material to clear the contents of the lecture and to acquire the particular knowledge about the subject area.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 2.5 hours written exam + written elaboration (incl. presentation) in sustainability management
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Structural Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Geotechnical Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Energy Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Renewable Energy: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Renewable Energies: Core qualification: Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Process Engineering: Specialisation Environmental Process Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Environment: Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Cities: Elective Compulsory
Course L0007: Sustainability Management
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 2, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Anne Rödl
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

The lecture "Sustainability Management" gives an insight into the different aspects and dimensions of sustainability. First, essential terms and definitions, significant developments of the last years, and legal framework conditions are explained. The various aspects of sustainability are then presented and discussed in detail. The lecture mainly focuses on concepts for the implementation of the topic sustainability in companies:

  • What is "sustainability"?
  • Why is this concept an important topic for companies?
  • What opportunities and business risks are addressed or are associated with it?
  • How can the often mentioned three pillars of sustainability - economy, ecology, and social- be meaningfully integrated into corporate management despite their sometimes contradictory tendencies, and how a corresponding compromise can be found?
  • What concepts or frameworks exist for the implementation of sustainability management in companies?
  • Which sustainability labels exist for products or companies? What do they have in common, and where do they differ?

Furthermore, the lecture is intended to provide insights into the concrete implementation of sustainability aspects into business practice. External lecturers from companies will be invited to report on how sustainability is integrated into their daily processes.

In the course of an independently carried out group work, the students will analyze and discuss the implementation of sustainability aspects based on short case studies. By studying and comparing best practice examples, the students will learn about corporate decisions' effects and implications. It should become clear which risks or opportunities are associated if sustainability aspects are taken into account in management decisions.

Literature

Die folgenden Bücher bieten einen Überblick:

Engelfried, J. (2011) Nachhaltiges Umweltmanagement. München: Oldenbourg Verlag. 2. Auflage

Corsten H., Roth S. (Hrsg.) (2011) Nachhaltigkeit - Unternehmerisches Handeln in globaler Verantwortung. Wiesbaden: Gabler Verlag.


Course L0013: Hydro Power Use
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Stefan Achleitner
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Introduction, importance of water power in the national and global context
  • Physical basics: Bernoulli's equation, usable height of fall, hydrological measures, loss mechanisms, efficiencies
  • Classification of Hydropower: Flow and Storage hydropower, low and high pressure systems
  • Construction of hydroelectric power plants: description of the individual components and their technical system interaction
  • Structural engineering components; representation of dams, weirs, dams, power houses, computer systems, etc.
  • Energy Technical Components: Illustration of the different types of hydraulic machinery, generators and grid connection
  • Hydropower and the Environment
  • Examples from practice

Literature
  • Schröder, W.; Euler, G.; Schneider, K.: Grundlagen des Wasserbaus; Werner, Düsseldorf, 1999, 4. Auflage
  • Quaschning, V.: Regenerative Energiesysteme: Technologie - Berechnung - Simulation; Carl Hanser, München, 2011, 7. Auflage
  • Giesecke, J.; Heimerl, S.; Mosony, E.: Wasserkraftanlagen ‑ Planung, Bau und Betrieb; Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2009, 5. Auflage
  • von König, F.; Jehle, C.: Bau von Wasserkraftanlagen - Praxisbezogene Planungsunterlagen; C. F. Müller, Heidelberg, 2005, 4. Auflage
  • Strobl, T.; Zunic, F.: Wasserbau: Aktuelle Grundlagen - Neue Entwicklungen; Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2006


Course L0011: Wind Turbine Plants
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Rudolf Zellermann
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Historical development
  • Wind: origins, geographic and temporal distribution, locations
  • Power coefficient, rotor thrust
  • Aerodynamics of the rotor
  • Operating performance
  • Power limitation, partial load, pitch and stall control
  • Plant selection, yield prediction, economy
  • Excursion
Literature

Gasch, R., Windkraftanlagen, 4. Auflage, Teubner-Verlag, 2005


Course L0012: Wind Energy Use - Focus Offshore
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Martin Skiba
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Introduction, importance of offshore wind power generation, Specific requirements for offshore engineering
  • Physical fundamentals for utilization of wind energy
  • Design and operation of offshore wind turbines, presentation of different concepts of offshore wind turbines, representation of the individual system components and their system-technical relationships
  • Foundation engineering, offshore site investigation, presentation of different concepts of offshore foundation structures, planning and fabrication of foundation structures
  • Electrical infrastructure of an offshore wind farm, Inner Park cabling, offshore substation, grid connection
  • Installation of offshore wind farms, installation techniques and auxiliary devices, construction logistics
  • Development and planning of offshore wind farms
  • Operation and optimization of offshore wind farms
  • Day excursion
Literature
  • Gasch, R.; Twele, J.: Windkraftanlagen - Grundlagen, Entwurf, Planung und Betrieb; Vieweg + Teubner, Stuttgart, 2007, 7. Auflage
  • Molly, J. P.: Windenergie - Theorie, Anwendung, Messung; C. F. Müller, Heidel-berg, 1997, 3. Auflage
  • Hau, E.: Windkraftanalagen; Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2008, 4.Auflage
  • Heier, S.: Windkraftanlagen - Systemauslegung, Integration und Regelung; Vieweg + Teubner, Stuttgart, 2009, 5. Auflage
  • Jarass, L.; Obermair, G.M.; Voigt, W.: Windenergie: Zuverlässige Integration in die Energieversorgung; Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2009, 2. Auflage


Module M0508: Fluid Mechanics and Ocean Energy

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Energy from the Ocean (L0002) Lecture 2 2
Fluid Mechanics II (L0001) Lecture 2 4
Module Responsible Prof. Michael Schlüter
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Technische Thermodynamik I-II
Wärme- und Stoffübertragung

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students are able to describe different applications of fluid mechanics for the field of Renewable Energies. They are able to use the fundamentals of fluid mechanics for calculations of certain engineering problems in the field of ocean energy. The students are able to estimate if a problem can be solved with an analytical solution and what kind of alternative possibilities are available (e.g. self-similarity, empirical solutions, numerical methods).

Skills

Students are able to use the governing equations of Fluid Dynamics for the design of technical processes. Especially they are able to formulate momentum and mass balances to optimize the hydrodynamics of technical processes. They are able to transform a verbal formulated message into an abstract formal procedure.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to discuss a given problem in small groups and to develop an approach. They are able to solve a problem within a team, to prepare a poster with the results and to present the poster.

Autonomy

Students are able to define independently tasks for problems related to fluid mechanics. They are able to work out the knowledge that is necessary to solve the problem by themselves on the basis of the existing knowledge from the lecture.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes 10 % Group discussion
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 3h
Assignment for the Following Curricula Energy Systems: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Renewable Energy: Elective Compulsory
Renewable Energies: Core qualification: Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L0002: Energy from the Ocean
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Moustafa Abdel-Maksoud
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  1. Introduction to ocean energy conversion
  2. Wave properties
    • Linear wave theory
    • Nonlinear wave theory
    • Irregular waves
    • Wave energy
    • Refraction, reflection and diffraction of waves
  3. Wave energy converters
    • Overview of the different technologies
    • Methods for design and calculation
  4. Ocean current turbine
Literature
  • Cruz, J., Ocean wave energy, Springer Series in Green Energy and Technology, UK, 2008.
  • Brooke, J., Wave energy conversion, Elsevier, 2003.
  • McCormick, M.E., Ocean wave energy conversion, Courier Dover Publications, USA, 2013.
  • Falnes, J., Ocean waves and oscillating systems, Cambridge University Press,UK, 2002.
  • Charlier, R. H., Charles, W. F., Ocean energy. Tide and tidal Power. Berlin, Heidelberg, 2009.
  • Clauss, G. F., Lehmann, E., Östergaard, C., Offshore Structures. Volume 1, Conceptual Design. Springer-Verlag, Berlin 1992


Course L0001: Fluid Mechanics II
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 92, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Michael Schlüter
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Differential equations for momentum-, heat and mass transfer   
  • Examples for simplifications of the Navier-Stokes Equations 
  • Unsteady momentum transfer
  • Free shear layer, turbulence and free jets
  • Flow around particles - Solids Process Engineering
  • Coupling of momentum and heat transfer - Thermal Process Engineering
  • Rheology – Bioprocess Engineering
  • Coupling of momentum- and mass transfer – Reactive mixing, Chemical Process Engineering 
  • Flow threw porous structures - heterogeneous catalysis
  • Pumps and turbines - Energy- and Environmental Process Engineering 
  • Wind- and Wave-Turbines - Renewable Energy
  • Introduction into Computational Fluid Dynamics

Literature
  1. Brauer, H.: Grundlagen der Einphasen- und Mehrphasenströmungen. Verlag Sauerländer, Aarau, Frankfurt (M), 1971.
  2. Brauer, H.; Mewes, D.: Stoffaustausch einschließlich chemischer Reaktion. Frankfurt: Sauerländer 1972.
  3. Crowe, C. T.: Engineering fluid mechanics. Wiley, New York, 2009.
  4. Durst, F.: Strömungsmechanik: Einführung in die Theorie der Strömungen von Fluiden. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2006.
  5. Fox, R.W.; et al.: Introduction to Fluid Mechanics. J. Wiley & Sons, 1994.
  6. Herwig, H.: Strömungsmechanik: Eine Einführung in die Physik und die mathematische Modellierung von Strömungen. Springer Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 2006.
  7. Herwig, H.: Strömungsmechanik: Einführung in die Physik von technischen Strömungen: Vieweg+Teubner Verlag / GWV Fachverlage GmbH, Wiesbaden, 2008.
  8. Kuhlmann, H.C.:  Strömungsmechanik. München, Pearson Studium, 2007
  9. Oertl, H.: Strömungsmechanik: Grundlagen, Grundgleichungen, Lösungsmethoden, Softwarebeispiele. Vieweg+ Teubner / GWV Fachverlage GmbH, Wiesbaden, 2009.
  10. Schade, H.; Kunz, E.: Strömungslehre. Verlag de Gruyter, Berlin, New York, 2007.
  11. Truckenbrodt, E.: Fluidmechanik 1: Grundlagen und elementare Strömungsvorgänge dichtebeständiger Fluide. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2008.
  12. Schlichting, H. : Grenzschicht-Theorie. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2006.
  13. van Dyke, M.: An Album of Fluid Motion. The Parabolic Press, Stanford California, 1882.  

Module M0515: Energy Information Systems and Electromobility

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Electrical Power Systems II: Operation and Information Systems of Electrical Power Grids (L1696) Lecture 3 4
Electro mobility (L1833) Lecture 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Martin Kaltschmitt
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students are able to give an overview of the electric power engineering in the field of renewable energies. They can explain in detail  the possibilities for the integration of renewable energy systems into the existing grid, the electrical storage possibilities and the electric power transmission and distribution, and can take critically a stand on it.

Skills With completion of this module the students are able to apply the acquired skills in applications of the design, integration, development of renewable energy systems and to assess the results.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students can participate in specialized and interdisciplinary discussions, advance ideas and represent their own work results in front of others.

Autonomy

Students can independently tap knowledge of the emphasis of the lectures. 

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Oral exam
Examination duration and scale 45 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Energy and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Energy and Environmental Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Renewable Energies: Specialisation Wind Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Renewable Energies: Specialisation Solar Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Course L1696: Electrical Power Systems II: Operation and Information Systems of Electrical Power Grids
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Christian Becker
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • steaedy-state modelling of electric power systems
    • conventional components
    • Flexible AC Transmission Systems (FACTS) and HVDC
    • grid modelling
  • grid operation
    • electric power supply processes
    • grid and power system management
    • grid provision
  • grid control systems
    • information and communication systems for power system management
    • IT architectures of bay-, substation and network control level 
    • IT integration (energy market / supply shortfall management / asset management)
    • future trends of process control technology
    • smart grids
  • functions and steady-state computations for power system operation and plannung
    • load-flow calculations
    • sensitivity analysis and power flow control
    • power system optimization
    • short-circuit calculation
    • asymmetric failure calculation
      • symmetric components
      • calculation of asymmetric failures
    • state estimation
Literature

E. Handschin: Elektrische Energieübertragungssysteme, Hüthig Verlag

B. R. Oswald: Berechnung von Drehstromnetzen, Springer-Vieweg Verlag

V. Crastan: Elektrische Energieversorgung Bd. 1 & 3, Springer Verlag

E.-G. Tietze: Netzleittechnik Bd. 1 & 2, VDE-Verlag

Course L1833: Electro mobility
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Klaus Bonhoff
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Introduction and environment
  • Definition of electric vehicles
  • Excursus: Electric vehicles with fuel cell
  • Market uptake of electric cars
  • Political / Regulatory Framework
  • Historical Review
  • Electric vehicle portfolio / application examples
  • Mild hybrids with 48 volt technology
  • Lithium-ion battery incl. Costs, roadmap, production, raw materials
  • Vehicle Integration
  • Energy consumption of electric cars
  • Battery life
  • Charging Infrastructure
  • Electric road transport
  • Electric public transport
  • Battery Safety

Literature Vorlesungsunterlagen/ lecture material

Module M1149: Marine Power Engineering

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Electrical Installation on Ships (L1531) Lecture 2 2
Electrical Installation on Ships (L1532) Recitation Section (large) 1 1
Marine Engineering (L1569) Lecture 2 2
Marine Engineering (L1570) Recitation Section (large) 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Christopher Friedrich Wirz
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students are able to describe the state-of-the-art regarding the wide range of propulsion components on ships and apply their knowledge. They further know how to analyze and optimize the interaction of the components of the propulsion system and how to describe complex correlations with the specific technical terms in German and English.  The students are able to name the operating behaviour of consumers, describe special requirements on the design of supply networks and to the electrical equipment in isolated networks, as e.g. onboard ships, offshore units, factories and emergency power supply systems, explain power generation and distribution in isolated grids, wave generator systems on ships, and name requirements for network protection, selectivity and operational monitoring.


Skills

The students are skilled to employ basic and detail knowledge regarding reciprocating machinery, their selection and operation on board ships. They are further able to assess, analyse and solve technical and operational problems with propulsion and auxiliary plants and to design propulsion systems. The students have the skills to describe complex correlations and bring them into context with related disciplines. Students are able to calculate short-circuit currents, switchgear, and design electrical propulsion systems for ships.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to communicate and cooperate in a professional environment in the shipbuilding and component supply industry.

 

Autonomy

The widespread scope of gained knowledge enables the students to handle situations in their future profession independently and confidently.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 minutes plus 20 minutes oral exam
Assignment for the Following Curricula Energy Systems: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Energy Systems: Specialisation Marine Engineering: Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L1531: Electrical Installation on Ships
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Günter Ackermann
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • performance in service of electrical consumers.
  • special requirements for power supply systems and for electrical equipment in isolated systems/networks e. g. aboard ships, offshore installations, factory systems and emergency power supply systems.
  • power generation and distribution in isolated networks, shaft generators for ships
  • calculation of short circuits and behaviour of switching devices
  • protective devices, selectivity monitoring
  • electrical Propulsion plants for ships
Literature

H. Meier-Peter, F. Bernhardt u. a.: Handbuch der Schiffsbetriebstechnik, Seehafen Verlag

(engl. Version: "Compendium Marine Engineering")

Gleß, Thamm: Schiffselektrotechnik, VEB Verlag Technik Berlin

Course L1532: Electrical Installation on Ships
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Günter Ackermann
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L1569: Marine Engineering
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Christopher Friedrich Wirz
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
Literature

Wird in der Veranstaltung bekannt gegeben

Course L1570: Marine Engineering
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Christopher Friedrich Wirz
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Specialization Aircraft Systems Engineering

Central to the specialization Aircraft Systems is learning the ability to systems engineering and cross-divisional thinking and problem solving in aeronautical engineering. This is made possible by modules in the field of physics of flight, aircraft systems and cabin systems, Aircraft Design, as well as airport planning and operation in the elective area. In addition, subjects in the Technical Supplement Course for TMBMS (according FSPO) are freely selectable.

Module M0763: Aircraft Energy Systems

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Aircraft Energy Systems (L0735) Lecture 3 4
Aircraft Energy Systems (L0739) Recitation Section (large) 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Frank Thielecke
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge in:

  • Mathematics
  • Mechanics
  • Thermodynamics
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Hydraulics
  • Control Systems
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students are able to:

  • Describe essential components and design points of hydraulic, electrical and high-lift systems
  • Give an overview of the functionality of air conditioning systems
  • Explain the need for high-lift systems such as ist functionality and effects
  • Assess the challenge during the design of supply systems of an aircraft


Skills

Students are able to:

  • Design hydraulic and electric supply systems of aircrafts
  • Design high-lift systems of aircrafts
  • Analyze the thermodynamic behaviour of air conditioning systems


Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to:

  • Perform system design in groups and present and discuss results


Autonomy

Students are able to:

  • Reflect the contents of lectures autonomously
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 165 Minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula Energy Systems: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Aviation Systems: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Aircraft Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L0735: Aircraft Energy Systems
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Frank Thielecke
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Hydraulic Energy Systems (Fluids; pressure loss in valves and pipes; components of hydraulic systems like pumps, valves, etc.; pressure/flow characteristics; actuators; tanks; power and heat balances; emergency power)
  • Electric Energy Systems (Generators; constant-speed-drives; DC and AC converters; electrical power distribution; bus systems; monitoring; load analysis)
  • High Lift Systems (Principles; investigation of loads and system actuation power; principles and sizing of actuation and positioning systems; safety requirements and devices)
  • Environmental Control Systems (Thermodynamic analysis; expansion and compression cooling systems; control strategies; cabin pressure control systems)


Literature
  • Moir, Seabridge: Aircraft Systems
  • Green: Aircraft Hydraulic Systems
  • Torenbek: Synthesis of Subsonic Airplane Design
  • SAE1991: ARP; Air Conditioning Systems for Subsonic Airplanes


Course L0739: Aircraft Energy Systems
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Frank Thielecke
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0812: Aircraft Design I (Civil Aircraft Design)

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Aircraft Design I (Design of Transport Aircraft) (L0820) Lecture 3 3
Aircraft Design I (Design of Transport Aircraft) (L0834) Recitation Section (large) 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Volker Gollnick
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
  • Bachelor Mech. Eng.
  • Bachelor Traffic Systems
  • Vordiplom Mech. Eng.
  • Module Air Transport Systems
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
  1. Principle understanding of integrated and civil aircraft design 
  2. Understanding of the interactions and contributions of the various disciplines
  3. Impact of the relevant design parameter on the civil aircraft design
  4. Introduction of the principle design methods
Skills

Understanding and application of design and calculation methods

Understanding of interdisciplinary and integrative interdependencies

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Working in interdisciplinary teams

Communication

Autonomy Organization of workflows and -strategies
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
No 10 % Attestation Durchführung einer Konzeptauslegung für ein Verkehrsflugzeug
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 180 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Aviation Systems: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Aircraft Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L0820: Aircraft Design I (Design of Transport Aircraft)
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick, Jens Thöben
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

Introduction into the aircraft design process

  1. Introduction/process of aircraft design/various aircraft configurations
  2. Requirements and design objectives, main design parameter (u.a. payload-range-diagramme)
  3. Statistical methods in overall aircraft design/data base methods
  4. Cabin design (fuselage sizing, cabin interior, loading systems)
  5. Principles of aerodynamic aircraft design (polar, geometry, 2D/3D aerodynamics)
  6. Wing Design
  7. Tail wings and landing gear
  8. Principles of engine design and integration
  9. Flight performance in cruise
  10. Take off and landing field length
  11. Loads and V-n-diagramme
  12. Operating cost calculation
Literature

J. Roskam: "Airplane Design"

D.P. Raymer: "Aircraft Design - A Conceptual Approach"

J.P. Fielding: "Introduction to Aircraft Design"

Jenkinson, Simpkon, Rhods: "Civil Jet Aircraft Design"

Course L0834: Aircraft Design I (Design of Transport Aircraft)
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick, Jens Thöben
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0771: Flight Physics

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Aerodynamics and Flight Mechanics I (L0727) Lecture 3 3
Flight Mechanics II (L0730) Lecture 2 2
Flight Mechanics II (L0731) Recitation Section (large) 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Frank Thielecke
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge in:

  • Mathematics
  • Mechanics
  • Thermodynamics
  • Aviation
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
Skills
Personal Competence
Social Competence
Autonomy
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 Minutes (WS) + 90 Minutes (SS)
Assignment for the Following Curricula Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Aviation Systems: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Aircraft Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L0727: Aerodynamics and Flight Mechanics I
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Frank Thielecke, Dr. Ralf Heinrich, Mike Montel
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Aerodynamics (fundamental equations of aerodynamics; compressible and incompressible flows; airfoils and wings; viscous flows)
  • Flight Mechanics (Equations of motion; flight performance; control surfaces; derivatives; lateral stability and control; trim conditions; flight maneuvers)


Literature
  • Schlichting, H.; Truckenbrodt, E.: Aerodynamik des Flugzeuges I und II
  • Etkin, B.: Dynamics of Atmospheric Flight
  • Sachs/Hafer: Flugmechanik
  • Brockhaus: Flugregelung
  • J.D. Anderson: Introduction to flight


Course L0730: Flight Mechanics II
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Frank Thielecke
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • stationary asymmetric flight
  • dynamics of lateral movement
  • methods of flight simulation
  • eyperimental methods of flight mechanics
  • model validation using system identification
  • wind tunnel techniques

Literature
  • Schlichting, H.; Truckenbrodt, E.: Aerodynamik des Flugzeuges I und II
  • Etkin, B.: Dynamics of Atmospheric Flight
  • Sachs/Hafer: Flugmechanik
  • Brockhaus: Flugregelung
  • J.D. Anderson: Introduction to flight




Course L0731: Flight Mechanics II
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Frank Thielecke
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1182: Technical Elective Course for TMBMS (according to Subject Specific Regulations)

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Module Responsible Prof. Robert Seifried
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge see FSPO
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge see FSPO
Skills see FSPO
Personal Competence
Social Competence see FSPO
Autonomy see FSPO
Workload in Hours Depends on choice of courses
Credit points 6
Assignment for the Following Curricula Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Aircraft Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Materials Science: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Bio- and Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Robotics and Computer Science: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Simulation Technology: Elective Compulsory

Module M1156: Systems Engineering

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Systems Engineering (L1547) Lecture 3 4
Systems Engineering (L1548) Recitation Section (large) 1 2
Module Responsible Prof. Ralf God
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge in:
• Mathematics
• Mechanics
• Thermodynamics
• Electrical Engineering
• Control Systems

Previous knowledge in:
• Aircraft Cabin Systems

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students are able to:
• understand systems engineering process models, methods and tools for the development of complex Systems
• describe innovation processes and the need for technology Management
• explain the aircraft development process and the process of type certification for aircraft
• explain the system development process, including requirements for systems reliability
• identify environmental conditions and test procedures for airborne Equipment
• value the methodology of requirements-based engineering (RBE) and model-based requirements engineering (MBRE)

Skills

Students are able to:
• plan the process for the development of complex Systems
• organize the development phases and development Tasks
• assign required business activities and technical Tasks
• apply systems engineering methods and tools

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to:
• understand their responsibilities within a development team and integrate themselves with their role in the overall process

Autonomy

Students are able to:
• interact and communicate in a development team which has distributed tasks

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 Minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Aviation Systems: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation System Design: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation Intelligent Systems and Robotics: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Aircraft Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L1547: Systems Engineering
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Ralf God
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

The objective of the lecture with the corresponding exercise is to accomplish the prerequisites for the development and integration of complex systems using the example of commercial aircraft and cabin systems. Competences in the systems engineering process, tools and methods is to be achieved. Regulations, guidelines and certification issues will be known.

Key aspects of the course are processes for innovation and technology management, system design, system integration and certification as well as tools and methods for systems engineering:
• Innovation processes
• IP-protection
• Technology management
• Systems engineering
• Aircraft program
• Certification issues
• Systems development
• Safety objectives and fault tolerance
• Environmental and operating conditions
• Tools for systems engineering
• Requirements-based engineering (RBE)
• Model-based requirements engineering (MBRE)


Literature

- Skript zur Vorlesung
- diverse Normen und Richtlinien (EASA, FAA, RTCA, SAE)
- Hauschildt, J., Salomo, S.: Innovationsmanagement. Vahlen, 5. Auflage, 2010
- NASA Systems Engineering Handbook, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2007
- Hinsch, M.: Industrielles Luftfahrtmanagement: Technik und Organisation luftfahrttechnischer Betriebe. Springer, 2010
- De Florio, P.: Airworthiness: An Introduction to Aircraft Certification. Elsevier Ltd., 2010
- Pohl, K.: Requirements Engineering. Grundlagen, Prinzipien, Techniken. 2. korrigierte Auflage, dpunkt.Verlag, 2008

Course L1548: Systems Engineering
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Ralf God
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0764: Flight Control Systems

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Flight Control Systems (L0736) Lecture 3 4
Flight Control Systems (L0740) Recitation Section (large) 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Frank Thielecke
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

basic knowledge of:

  • mathematics
  • mechanics
  • thermo dynamics
  • electronics
  • fluid technology
  • control technology
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge Students are able to…
  • describe the structure of primary flight control systems as well as actuation-, avionic-, high lift systems in general along with corresponding properties and applications.
  • explain different configurations  and designs and their origins

Skills Students are able to…
  • size primary flight control actuation systems
  • perform a controller design process for the flight control actuators
  • design high-lift kinematics

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to:

  • Develop joint solutions in mixed teams
Autonomy

Students are able to:

  • derive requirements and perform appropriate yet simplified design processes for aircraft systems from complex issues and circumstances in a self-reliant manner
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 165 Minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Aviation Systems: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Aircraft Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L0736: Flight Control Systems
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Frank Thielecke
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Actuation (Principles of actuators; electro-mechanical actuators; modeling, analysis and sizing of position control systems; hydro-mechanic actuation systems)
  • Flight Control Systems (control surfaces, hinge moments; requirements of stability and controllability, actuation power; principles of reversible and irreversible flight control systems; servo actuation systems)
  • Landing Gear Systems (Configurations and geometries; analysis of landing gear systems with respect to damper dynamics, dynamics of the breaking aircraft and power consumption; design and analysis of breaking systems with respect to energy and heat; anti-skit systems)
  • Fuel Systems (Architectures; aviation fuels; system components; fueling system; tank inerting system; fuel management; trim tank)
  • De- and Anti-Ice Systems: (Atmospheric icing conditions; principles of de- and anti-ice systems)


Literature
  • Moir, Seabridge: Aircraft Systems
  • Torenbek: Synthesis of Subsonic Airplane Design
  • Curry: Aircraft Landing Gear Design: Principles and Practices


Course L0740: Flight Control Systems
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Frank Thielecke
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1690: Aircraft Design II (Special Air Vehicle Design)

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Aircraft Design II (Conceptual Design of Rotorcraft, special operations aircraft, UAV) (L0844) Lecture 3 3
Aircraft Design II (Conceptual Design of Rotorcraft, special operations aircraft, UAV) (L0847) Recitation Section (large) 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Volker Gollnick
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Aircraft Design I (Design of Transport Aircraft)

Air Transportation Systems

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Understanding of various flight systems and its special characteristics (supersonic aircraft, rotorcraft, high performance aircraft, unmanned air systems)

Understanding of pro´s and con´s and physical characteristics of different air systems

Understanding of special mission requirements and its impact on systems definition and conceptual design

Intensified knowledge of performance design on various air systems



Skills

Understanding and application of design and calculation methods

Understanding of interdisciplinary and integrative interdependencies

mission oriented technical definition of air systems

special conceptual calculation methods for special equipment characteristics

assessment of different design solutions

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Working in teams for focused solutions 

communication, assertiveness, technical persuasion

Autonomy

Organisation of worksflows and strategies for solutions

structured task analysis and definition of solutions

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 180 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Aviation Systems: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Aircraft Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L0844: Aircraft Design II (Conceptual Design of Rotorcraft, special operations aircraft, UAV)
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick, Dr. Bernd Liebhardt, Jens Thöben
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content
  1. Design of supersonic civil aircraft
  2. Principles of high performance and special operations aircraft design
  3. Principles of Rotorcraft Design
  4. Principles of Unmanned Air Systems design, air taxis, electric aircraft
Literature

Gareth Padfield: Helicopter Flight Dynamics, butterworth ltd.

Raymond Prouty: Helicopter Performance Stability and Control, Krieger Publ.

Klaus Hünecke: Das Kampfflugzeug von Heute, Motorbuch Verlag

Jay Gundelach: Designing Unmanned Aircraft Systems -  Configurative Approach, AIAA

Course L0847: Aircraft Design II (Conceptual Design of Rotorcraft, special operations aircraft, UAV)
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick, Dr. Bernd Liebhardt, Jens Thöben
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1155: Aircraft Cabin Systems

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Aircraft Cabin Systems (L1545) Lecture 3 4
Aircraft Cabin Systems (L1546) Recitation Section (large) 1 2
Module Responsible Prof. Ralf God
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge in:
• Mathematics
• Mechanics
• Thermodynamics
• Electrical Engineering
• Control Systems

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students are able to:
• describe cabin operations, equipment in the cabin and cabin Systems
• explain the functional and non-functional requirements for cabin Systems
• elucidate the necessity of cabin operating systems and emergency Systems
• assess the challenges human factors integration in a cabin environment

Skills

Students are able to:
• design a cabin layout for a given business model of an Airline
• design cabin systems for safe operations
• design emergency systems for safe man-machine interaction
• solve comfort needs and entertainment requirements in the cabin

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to:
• understand existing system solutions and discuss their ideas with experts

Autonomy

Students are able to:
• Reflect the contents of lectures and expert presentations self-dependent

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 Minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Control and Power Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Energy Systems: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Aviation Systems: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Aircraft Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L1545: Aircraft Cabin Systems
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Ralf God
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

The objective of the lecture with the corresponding exercise is the acquisition of knowledge about aircraft cabin systems and cabin operations. A basic understanding of technological and systems engineering effort to maintain an artificial but comfortable and safe travel and working environment at cruising altitude is to be achieved.

The course provides a comprehensive overview of current technology and cabin systems in modern passenger aircraft. The Fulfillment of requirements for the cabin as the central system of work are covered on the basis of the topics comfort, ergonomics, human factors, operational processes, maintenance and energy supply:
• Materials used in the cabin
• Ergonomics and human factors
• Cabin interior and non-electrical systems
• Cabin electrical systems and lights
• Cabin electronics, communication-, information- and IFE-systems
• Cabin and passenger process chains
• RFID Aircraft Parts Marking
• Energy sources and energy conversion

Literature

- Skript zur Vorlesung
- Jenkinson, L.R., Simpkin, P., Rhodes, D.: Civil Jet Aircraft Design. London: Arnold, 1999
- Rossow, C.-C., Wolf, K., Horst, P. (Hrsg.): Handbuch der Luftfahrzeugtechnik. Carl Hanser Verlag, 2014
- Moir, I., Seabridge, A.: Aircraft Systems: Mechanical, Electrical and Avionics Subsystems Integration, Wiley 2008
- Davies, M.: The standard handbook for aeronautical and astronautical engineers. McGraw-Hill, 2003
- Kompendium der Flugmedizin. Verbesserte und ergänzte Neuauflage, Nachdruck April 2006. Fürstenfeldbruck, 2006
- Campbell, F.C.: Manufacturing Technology for Aerospace Structural Materials. Elsevier Ltd., 2006

Course L1546: Aircraft Cabin Systems
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Ralf God
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1213: Avionics for safety-critical Systems

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Avionics of Safty Critical Systems (L1640) Lecture 2 3
Avionics of Safty Critical Systems (L1641) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Avionics of Safty Critical Systems (L1652) Practical Course 1 2
Module Responsible Dr. Martin Halle
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge in:

  • Mathematics
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Informatics
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students can:


  • describe the most important principles and components of safety-critical avionics
  • denote processes and standards of safety-critical software development
  • depict the principles of Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA)
  • can compare hardware and bus systems used in avionics
  • assess the difficulties of developing a safety-critical avionics system correctly


Skills Students can …
  • operate real-time hardware and simulations
  • program A653 applications
  • plan avionics architectures up to a certain extend
  • create test scripts and assess test results


Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students can:

  • jointly develop solutions in inhomogeneous teams
  • exchange information formally with other teams 
  • present development results in a convenient way


Autonomy

Students can:

  • understand the requirements for an avionics system
  • autonomously derive concepts for systems based on safety-critical avionics


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes None Subject theoretical and practical work
Examination Oral exam
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Electrical Engineering: Specialisation Control and Power Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Aircraft Systems Engineering: Specialisation Aircraft Systems: Elective Compulsory
Aircraft Systems Engineering: Specialisation Cabin Systems: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Aircraft Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L1640: Avionics of Safty Critical Systems
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Martin Halle
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

Avionics are all kinds off flight electronics. Today there is no aircraft system function without avionics, and avionics are one main source of innovation in aerospace industry. Since many system functions are highly safety critical, the development of avionics hardware and software underlies mandatory constraints, technics, and processes. It is inevitable for system developers and computer engineers in aerospace industry to understand and master these. This lecture teaches the risks and techniques of developing safety critical hardware and software; major avionics components; integration; and test with a practical orientation. A focus is on Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA). The lecture is accompanied by a mandatory and laboratory exercises.

Content:

  1. Introduction and Fundamentals
  2. History and Flight Control
  3. Concepts and Redundancy
  4. Digital Computers
  5. Interfaces and Signals
  6. Busses
  7. Networks
  8. Aircraft Cockpit
  9. Software Development
  10. Model-based Development
  11. Integrated Modular Avionics I
  12. Integrated Modular Avionics II
Literature
  • Moir, I.; Seabridge, A. & Jukes, M., Civil Avionics Systems Civil Avionics Systems, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 2013
  • Spitzer, C. R. Spitzer, Digital Avionics Handbook, CRC Press, 2007
  • FAA, Advanced Avionics Handbook U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Aviation Administration, 2009
  • Moir, I. & Seabridge, A. Aircraft Systems, Wiley, 2008, 3
Course L1641: Avionics of Safty Critical Systems
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Dr. Martin Halle
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L1652: Avionics of Safty Critical Systems
Typ Practical Course
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Dr. Martin Halle
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1193: Cabin Systems Engineering

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Computer and communication technology in cabin electronics and avionics (L1557) Lecture 2 2
Computer and communication technology in cabin electronics and avionics (L1558) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) with SysML/UML (L1551) Project-/problem-based Learning 3 3
Module Responsible Prof. Ralf God
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge in:
• Mathematics
• Mechanics
• Thermodynamics
• Electrical Engineering
• Control Systems

Previous knowledge in:
• Systems Engineering

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students are able to:
• describe the structure and operation of computer architectures
• explain the structure and operation of digital communication Networks
• explain architectures of cabin electronics, integrated modular avionics (IMA) and Aircraft Data Communication Network (ADCN)
• understand the approach of Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) in the design of hardware and software-based cabin systems

Skills

Students are able to:
• understand, operate and maintain a Minicomputer
• build up a network communication and communicate with other network participants
• connect a minicomputer with a cabin management system (A380 CIDS) and communicate over a AFDX®-Network
• model system functions by means of formal languages SysML/UML and generate software code from the models
• execute software code on a minicomputer

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to:
• elaborate partial results and merge with others to form a complete solution

Autonomy

Students are able to:
• organize and schedule their practical tasks

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula Aircraft Systems Engineering: Specialisation Aircraft Systems: Elective Compulsory
Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Aviation Systems: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Aircraft Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L1557: Computer and communication technology in cabin electronics and avionics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Ralf God
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

The objective of the lecture with the corresponding exercise is the acquisition of knowledge of computer and communication technology in electronic systems in the cabin and in aircraft. For the system engineer the strong interaction of software, mechanical and electronic system components nowadays requires a basic understanding of cabin electronics and avionics.

The course teaches the basics of design and functionality of computers and data networks. Subsequently it focuses on current principles and applications in integrated modular avionics (IMA), aircraft data communication networks (ADCN), cabin electronics and cabin networks:
• History of computer and network technology 
• Layer model in computer technology
• Computer architectures (PC, IPC, Embedded Systems)
• BIOS, UEFI and operating system (OS)
• Programming languages (machine code and high-level languages)
• Applications and Application Programming Interfaces
• External interfaces (serial, USB, Ethernet)
• Layer model in network technology
• Network topologies
• Network components
• Bus access procedures
• Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) and Aircraft Data Communication Networks (ADCN)
• Cabin electronics and cabin networks

Literature

- Skript zur Vorlesung
- Schnabel, P.: Computertechnik-Fibel: Grundlagen Computertechnik, Mikroprozessortechnik, Halbleiterspeicher, Schnittstellen und Peripherie. Books on Demand; 1. Auflage, 2003
- Schnabel, P.: Netzwerktechnik-Fibel: Grundlagen, Übertragungstechnik und Protokolle, Anwendungen und Dienste, Sicherheit. Books on Demand; 1. Auflage, 2004
- Wüst, K.: Mikroprozessortechnik: Grundlagen, Architekturen und Programmierung von Mikroprozessoren, Mikrocontrollern und Signalprozessoren. Vieweg Verlag; 2. aktualisierte und erweiterte Auflage, 2006 

Course L1558: Computer and communication technology in cabin electronics and avionics
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Ralf God
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

The objective of the lecture with the corresponding exercise is the acquisition of knowledge of computer and communication technology in electronic systems in the cabin and in aircraft. For the system engineer the strong interaction of software, mechanical and electronic system components nowadays requires a basic understanding of cabin electronics and avionics.

The course teaches the basics of design and functionality of computers and data networks. Subsequently it focuses on current principles and applications in integrated modular avionics (IMA), aircraft data communication networks (ADCN), cabin electronics and cabin networks:
• History of computer and network technology 
• Layer model in computer technology
• Computer architectures (PC, IPC, Embedded Systems)
• BIOS, UEFI and operating system (OS)
• Programming languages (machine code and high-level languages)
• Applications and Application Programming Interfaces
• External interfaces (serial, USB, Ethernet)
• Layer model in network technology
• Network topologies
• Network components
• Bus access procedures
• Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) and Aircraft Data Communication Networks (ADCN)
• Cabin electronics and cabin networks

Literature

- Skript zur Vorlesung
- Schnabel, P.: Computertechnik-Fibel: Grundlagen Computertechnik, Mikroprozessortechnik, Halbleiterspeicher, Schnittstellen und Peripherie. Books on Demand; 1. Auflage, 2003
- Schnabel, P.: Netzwerktechnik-Fibel: Grundlagen, Übertragungstechnik und Protokolle, Anwendungen und Dienste, Sicherheit. Books on Demand; 1. Auflage, 2004
- Wüst, K.: Mikroprozessortechnik: Grundlagen, Architekturen und Programmierung von Mikroprozessoren, Mikrocontrollern und Signalprozessoren. Vieweg Verlag; 2. aktualisierte und erweiterte Auflage, 2006 

Course L1551: Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) with SysML/UML
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Ralf God
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

Objectives of the problem-oriented course are the acquisition of knowledge on system design using the formal languages SysML/UML, learning about tools for modeling and finally the implementation of a project with methods and tools of Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) on a realistic hardware platform (e.g. Arduino®, Raspberry Pi®):
• What is a model? 
• What is Systems Engineering? 
• Survey of MBSE methodologies
• The modelling languages SysML /UML 
• Tools for MBSE 
• Best practices for MBSE 
• Requirements specification, functional architecture, specification of a solution
• From model to software code 
• Validation and verification: XiL methods
• Accompanying MBSE project

Literature

- Skript zur Vorlesung
- Weilkiens, T.: Systems Engineering mit SysML/UML: Modellierung, Analyse, Design. 2. Auflage, dpunkt.Verlag, 2008
- Holt, J., Perry, S.A., Brownsword, M.: Model-Based Requirements Engineering. Institution Engineering & Tech, 2011


Module M1738: Selected Topics of Aeronautical Systems Engineering (Alternative B: 12 LP)

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Advanced Training Course SE-ZERT (L2739) Project-/problem-based Learning 2 3
Airline Operations (L1310) Lecture 3 3
Fatigue & Damage Tolerance (L0310) Lecture 2 3
Flight Guidance (L0848) Lecture 2 2
Flight Guidance (L0854) Recitation Section (large) 1 1
Airport Operations (L1276) Lecture 3 3
Airport Planning (L1275) Lecture 2 2
Airport Planning (L1469) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Lightweight Design Practical Course (L1258) Project-/problem-based Learning 3 3
Aviation Security (L1549) Lecture 2 2
Aviation Security (L1550) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Aviation and Environment (L2376) Lecture 3 3
Mechanisms, Systems and Processes of Materials Testing (L0950) Lecture 2 2
Mission Management (L2374) Lecture 2 2
Mission Management (L2375) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Turbo Jet Engines (L0908) Lecture 2 3
Structural Mechanics of Fibre Reinforced Composites (L1514) Lecture 2 3
Structural Mechanics of Fibre Reinforced Composites (L1515) Recitation Section (large) 1 1
System Simulation (L1820) Lecture 2 2
System Simulation (L1821) Recitation Section (large) 1 2
Materials Testing (L0949) Lecture 2 2
Reliability in Engineering Dynamics (L0176) Lecture 2 2
Reliability in Engineering Dynamics (L1303) Recitation Section (small) 1 2
Reliability of Aircraft Systems (L0749) Lecture 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Frank Thielecke
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge in:

  • Mathematics
  • Mechanics
  • Thermodynamics
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Hydraulics
  • Control Systems
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
  • Students are able to find their way through selected special areas within systems engineering, air transportation system and material science
  • Students are able to explain basic models and procedures in selected special areas.
  • Students are able to interrelate scientific and technical knowledge.
Skills

Students are able to apply basic methods in selected areas of engineering.

Personal Competence
Social Competence
Autonomy

Students can chose independently, in which fields they want to deepen their knowledge and skills through the election of courses.

Workload in Hours Depends on choice of courses
Credit points 12
Assignment for the Following Curricula Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Aircraft Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Course L2739: Advanced Training Course SE-ZERT
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 120 min
Lecturer Prof. Ralf God
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
Literature

INCOSE Systems Engineering Handbuch - Ein Leitfaden für Systemlebenszyklus-Prozesse und -Aktivitäten, GfSE (Hrsg. der deutschen Übersetzung), ISBN 978-3-9818805-0-2.

ISO/IEC 15288 System- und Software-Engineering - System-Lebenszyklus-Prozesse (Systems and Software Engineering - System Life Cycle Processes).

Course L1310: Airline Operations
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick, Dr. Karl Echtermeyer
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  1. Introdution and overview
  2. Airline business models
  3. Interdependencies in flight planning (network management, slot management, netzwork structures, aircraft circulation)
  4. Operative flight preparation (weight & balance, payload/range, etc.)
  5. fleet policy
  6. Aircraft assessment and fleet planning
  7. Airline organisation
  8. Aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul
Literature

Volker Gollnick, Dieter Schmitt: The Air Transport System, Springer Berlin Heidelberg New York, 2014

Paul Clark: “Buying the Big Jets”, Ashgate 2008

Mike Hirst: The Air Transport System, AIAA, 2008

Course L0310: Fatigue & Damage Tolerance
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 45 min
Lecturer Dr. Martin Flamm
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content Design principles, fatigue strength, crack initiation and crack growth, damage calculation, counting methods, methods to improve fatigue strength, environmental influences
Literature Jaap Schijve, Fatigue of Structures and Materials. Kluver Academic Puplisher, Dordrecht, 2001 E. Haibach. Betriebsfestigkeit Verfahren und Daten zur Bauteilberechnung. VDI-Verlag, Düsseldorf, 1989
Course L0848: Flight Guidance
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

Introduction and motivation Flight guidance principles (airspace structures, organization of air navigation services, etc.)

Cockpit systems and Avionics (cockpit design, cockpit equipment, displays, computers and bus systems)

Principles of flight measurement techniques (Measurement of position (geometric methods, distance measurement, direction measurement) Determination of the aircraft attitude (magnetic field- and inertial sensors) Measurement of speed

Principles of Navigation

Radio navigation

Satellite navigation

Airspace surveillance (radar systems)

Commuication systems

Integrated Navigation and Guidance Systems

Literature

Rudolf Brockhaus, Robert Luckner, Wolfgang Alles: "Flugregelung", Springer Berlin Heidelberg New York, 2011

Holger Flühr: "Avionik und Flugsicherungssysteme", Springer Berlin Heidelberg New York, 2013

Volker Gollnick, Dieter Schmitt "Air Transport Systems", Springer Berlin Heidelberg New York, 2016

R.P.G. Collinson „Introduction to Avionics”, Springer Berlin Heidelberg New York 2003

Course L0854: Flight Guidance
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L1276: Airport Operations
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick, Peter Willems (geb. Bießlich)
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content FA-F Flight Operations Flight Operations - Production Infrastructures Operations Planning Master plan Airport capacity Ground handling Terminal operations
Literature Richard de Neufville, Amedeo Odoni: Airport Systems, McGraw Hill, 2003
Course L1275: Airport Planning
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick, Dr. Ulrich Häp
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  1. Introduction, definitions, overviewg
  2. Runway systems
  3. Air space strucutres around airports
  4. Airfield lightings, marking and information
  5. Airfield and terminal configuration
Literature

N. Ashford, Martin Stanton, Clifton Moore: Airport Operations, John Wiley & Sons, 1991

Richard de Neufville, Amedeo Odoni: Airport Systems, Aviation Week Books, MacGraw Hill, 2003



Course L1469: Airport Planning
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick, Dr. Ulrich Häp
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L1258: Lightweight Design Practical Course
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Lecturer Prof. Dieter Krause
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

Development of a sandwich structure made of fibre reinforced plastics

  • getting familiar with fibre reinforced plastics as well as lightweight design
  • Design of a sandwich structure made of fibre reinforced plastics using finite element analysis (FEA)
  • Determination of material properties based on sample tests
  • manufacturing of the structure in the composite lab
  • Testing of the developed structure
  • Concept presentation
  • Self-organised teamwork
Literature
  • Schürmann, H., „Konstruieren mit Faser-Kunststoff-Verbunden“, Springer, Berlin, 2005.
  • Puck, A., „Festigkeitsanalsyse von Faser-Matrix-Laminaten“, Hanser, München, Wien, 1996.
  • R&G, „Handbuch Faserverbundwerkstoffe“, Waldenbuch, 2009.
  • VDI 2014 „Entwicklung von Bauteilen aus Faser-Kunststoff-Verbund“
  • Ehrenstein, G. W., „Faserverbundkunststoffe“, Hanser, München, 2006.
  • Klein, B., „Leichtbau-Konstruktion", Vieweg & Sohn, Braunschweig, 1989.
  • Wiedemann, J., „Leichtbau Band 1: Elemente“, Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, 1986.
  • Wiedemann, J., „Leichtbau Band 2: Konstruktion“, Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, 1986.
  • Backmann, B.F., „Composite Structures, Design, Safety and Innovation”, Oxford (UK), Elsevier, 2005.
  • Krause, D., „Leichtbau”,  In: Handbuch Konstruktion, Hrsg.: Rieg, F., Steinhilper, R., München, Carl Hanser Verlag, 2012.
  • Schulte, K., Fiedler, B., „Structure and Properties of Composite Materials”, Hamburg, TUHH - TuTech Innovation GmbH, 2005.
Course L1549: Aviation Security
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 90 Minuten
Lecturer Prof. Ralf God
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

The objective of the lecture with the corresponding exercise is the acquisition of knowledge about tasks and measures for protection against attacks on the security of the commercial air transport system. Tasks and measures will be elicited in the context of the three system components man, technology and organization.

The course teaches the basics of aviation security. Aviation security is a necessary prerequisite for an economically successful air transport system. Risk management for the entire system can only be successful in an integrated approach, considering man, technology and organization:
• Historical development 
• The special role of air transport 
• Motive and attack vectors 
• The human factor 
• Threats and risk 
• Regulations and law 
• Organization and implementation of aviation security tasks 
• Passenger and baggage checks 
• Cargo screening and secure supply chain 
• Safety technologies

Literature

- Skript zur Vorlesung
- Giemulla, E.M., Rothe B.R. (Hrsg.): Handbuch Luftsicherheit. Universitätsverlag TU Berlin, 2011
- Thomas, A.R. (Ed.): Aviation Security Management. Praeger Security International, 2008

Course L1550: Aviation Security
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 90 Minuten
Lecturer Prof. Ralf God
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

The objective of the lecture with the corresponding exercise is the acquisition of knowledge about tasks and measures for protection against attacks on the security of the commercial air transport system. Tasks and measures will be elicited in the context of the three system components man, technology and organization.

The course teaches the basics of aviation security. Aviation security is a necessary prerequisite for an economically successful air transport system. Risk management for the entire system can only be successful in an integrated approach, considering man, technology and organization:
• Historical development 
• The special role of air transport 
• Motive and attack vectors 
• The human factor 
• Threats and risk 
• Regulations and law 
• Organization and implementation of aviation security tasks 
• Passenger and baggage checks 
• Cargo screening and secure supply chain 
• Safety technologies

Literature

- Skript zur Vorlesung

- Giemulla, E.M., Rothe B.R. (Hrsg.): Handbuch Luftsicherheit. Universitätsverlag TU Berlin, 2011

- Thomas, A.R. (Ed.): Aviation Security Management. Praeger Security International, 2008

Course L2376: Aviation and Environment
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

The lecture provides the necessary basics and methods for understanding the interactions between air traffic and the environment, both in terms of the effects of weather / climate on flying and with regard to the effects of air traffic on pollutant emissions, noise and climate.

The following topics are covered:

  • Atmospheric physics / chemistry
    • Structure and statics
    • Dynamics (water cycle, formation of weather events, high and low pressure areas, wind, gusts and turbulence)
    • Cloud physics (thermodynamics, contrails)
    • Radiation physics (energy balance, greenhouse effect)
    • Photochemistry (ozone chemistry)
  • Impact of weather on flying
    • Atmospheric influences on flight performance
    • Flight planning
    • Disturbances due to weather, e.g. thunderstorms, winter weather (icing), clear air turbulence, visibility
    • Effects of climate change and adaptation
  • Effects of air traffic on the environment and climate
    • Aviation pollutant emissions
    • Effect of emissions on concentrations in the atmosphere
    • Climate metrics / models and background scenarios
    • Emissions inventories
  • Mitigation measures
    • Technological measures, e.g. climate-optimized aircraft design
    • Alternative fuels
    • Operational measures, e.g. climate-optimized flight planning
    • Environmental policy measures, e.g. EU-ETS, CORSIA
    • Potentials and comparison, concept of eco-efficiency
  • Local environmental impacts
    • Local air quality (particulate matter, other emissions near the ground)
    • Noise (noise sources, noise metrics, noise impact, measurement, certification, psychoacoustics, noise mitigation)
    • Health effects
  • Aspects of sustainability
    • Other aspects, including life cycle emissions, disposal/recycling
    • Relation to global goals, e.g. United Nations goals for sustainable development, Paris climate agreement


Literature
  • Ruijgrok, G.: Elements of Aircraft Pollution, Delft University Press, 2005
  • Friedrich, R., Reis, S.: Emissions of Air Pollutants, Springer 2004
  • Janic, M.: The Sustainability of Air Transportation, Ashgate, 2007
  • Schumann, U. (ed.): Atmospheric Physics: Background - Methods - Trends, Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2012
  • Spiridonov, V., Curic, M.: Fundamentals of Meteorology, Springer, 2021
  • Kaltschmitt, M., Neuling, U.: Biokerosene - Status and Prospects, Springer, 2018
  • Roedel, W., Wagner, T.: Physik unserer Umwelt: Die Atmosphäre, Springer, 2017
  • W. Bräunling: Flugzeugtriebwerke. Springer-Verlag Berlin, Deutschland, 2009
  • G. Brüning, X. Hafer, G. Sachs: Flugleistungen, Springer, 1993
Course L0950: Mechanisms, Systems and Processes of Materials Testing
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 90 Minuten
Lecturer Dr. Jan Oke Peters
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

Application, analysis and discussion of basic and advanced testing methods to ensure correct selection of applicable testing procedure for investigation of part/materials deficiencies

  • Stress-strain relationships
  • Strain gauge application
  • Visko elastic behavior
  • Tensile test (strain hardening, necking, strain rate)
  • Compression test, bending test, torsion test
  • Crack growth upon static loading (J-Integral)                                
  • Crack growth upon cyclic loading (micro- und macro cracks)
  • Effect of notches
  • Creep testing (physical creep test, influence of stress and temperature, Larson Miller parameter)
  • Wear testing
  • Non destructive testing application for overhaul of jet engines
Literature
  • E. Macherauch: Praktikum in Werkstoffkunde, Vieweg
  • G. E. Dieter: Mechanical Metallurgy, McGraw-Hill            
  • R. Bürgel: Lehr- und Übungsbuch Festigkeitslehre, Vieweg                        
  • R. Bürgel: Werkstoffe sícher beurteilen und richtig einsetzen, Vieweg
Course L2374: Mission Management
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
Literature

Brockhaus, Alles, Luckner: Flugregelung, Springer Verlag, 2011

R.P.G Collinson: Introduction to Avionics Systems, Springer Verlag, 2011

Course L2375: Mission Management
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L0908: Turbo Jet Engines
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 45 min
Lecturer Dr. Burkhard Andrich
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Cycle of the gas turbine
  • Thermodynamics of gas turbine components
  • Wing-, grid- and stage-sizing
  • Operating characteristics of gas turbine components
  • Sizing criteria’s for jet engines
  • Development trends of gas turbines and jet engines
  • Maintenance of jet engines


Literature
  • Bräunling: Flugzeugtriebwerke
  • Engmann: Technologie des Fliegens
  • Kerrebrock: Aircraft Engines and Gas Turbines


Course L1514: Structural Mechanics of Fibre Reinforced Composites
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Lecturer Prof. Benedikt Kriegesmann
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

Classical laminate theory

Rules of mixture

Failure mechanisms and criteria of composites

Boundary value problems of isotropic and anisotropic shells

Stability of composite structures

Optimization of laminated composites

Modelling composites in FEM

Numerical multiscale analysis of textile composites   

Progressive failure analysis   

Literature
  • Schürmann, H., „Konstruieren mit Faser-Kunststoff-Verbunden“, Springer, Berlin, aktuelle Auflage.
  • Wiedemann, J., „Leichtbau Band 1: Elemente“, Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, , aktuelle Auflage.
  • Reddy, J.N., „Mechanics of Composite Laminated Plates and Shells”, CRC Publishing, Boca Raton et al., current edition.
  • Jones, R.M., „Mechanics of Composite Materials“, Scripta Book Co., Washington, current edition.
  • Timoshenko, S.P., Gere, J.M., „Theory of elastic stability“, McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., New York, current edition.
  • Turvey, G.J., Marshall, I.H., „Buckling and postbuckling of composite plates“, Chapman and Hall, London, current edition.
  • Herakovich, C.T., „Mechanics of fibrous composites“, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, current edition.
  • Mittelstedt, C., Becker, W., „Strukturmechanik ebener Laminate”, aktuelle Auflage.
Course L1515: Structural Mechanics of Fibre Reinforced Composites
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Lecturer Prof. Benedikt Kriegesmann
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L1820: System Simulation
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Lecturer Dr. Stefan Wischhusen
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

Lecture about equation-based, physical modelling using the modelling language Modelica and the free simulation tool OpenModelica.

  • Instruction and modelling of physical processes
  • Modelling and limits of model
  • Time constant, stiffness, stability, step size
  • Terms of object orientated programming
  • Differential equations of simple systems
  • Introduction into Modelica
  • Introduction into simulation tool
  • Example:Hydraulic systems and heat transfer
  • Example: System with different subsystems
Literature

[1]    Modelica Association: "Modelica Language Specification - Version 3.4", Linköping,  Sweden, 2017                                                                                                               
[2]    M. Tiller:  “Modelica by Example", http://book.xogeny.com, 2014.

[3]    M. Otter, H. Elmqvist, et al.: "Objektorientierte Modellierung Physikalischer Systeme",  at- Automatisierungstechnik (german), Teil 1 - 17, Oldenbourg Verlag, 1999 - 2000.

[4]    P. Fritzson: "Principles of Object-Oriented Modeling and Simulation with Modelica 3.3", Wiley-IEEE Press, New York, 2015.

[5]    P. Fritzson: “Introduction to Modeling and Simulation of Technical and Physical  Systems with Modelica”, Wiley, New York, 2011.

Course L1821: System Simulation
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Lecturer Dr. Stefan Wischhusen
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L0949: Materials Testing
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 90 Minuten
Lecturer Dr. Jan Oke Peters
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content


Application and analysis of basic mechanical as well as non-destructive testing of materials  

  • Determination elastic constants                                                                                                                    
  • Tensile test
  • Fatigue test (testing with constant stress, strain, or plastiv strain amplitude, low and high cycle fatigue, mean stress effect)
  • Crack growth upon static loading (stress intensity factor, fracture toughness)
  • Creep test
  • Hardness test
  • Charpy impact test
  • Non destructive testing
Literature

E. Macherauch: Praktikum in Werkstoffkunde, Vieweg
G. E. Dieter: Mechanical Metallurgy, McGraw-Hill

Course L0176: Reliability in Engineering Dynamics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 90 min.
Lecturer NN
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

Method for calculation and testing of reliability of dynamic machine systems 

  • Modeling
  • System identification
  • Simulation
  • Processing of measurement data
  • Damage accumulation
  • Test planning and execution
Literature

Bertsche, B.: Reliability in Automotive and Mechanical Engineering. Springer, 2008. ISBN: 978-3-540-33969-4

Inman, Daniel J.: Engineering Vibration. Prentice Hall, 3rd Ed., 2007. ISBN-13: 978-0132281737

Dresig, H., Holzweißig, F.: Maschinendynamik, Springer Verlag, 9. Auflage, 2009. ISBN 3540876936.

VDA (Hg.): Zuverlässigkeitssicherung bei Automobilherstellern und Lieferanten. Band 3 Teil 2, 3. überarbeitete Auflage, 2004. ISSN 0943-9412

Course L1303: Reliability in Engineering Dynamics
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Lecturer NN
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L0749: Reliability of Aircraft Systems
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 90 Minuten
Lecturer Prof. Frank Thielecke, Dr. Andreas Vahl, Dr. Uwe Wieczorek
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Functions of reliability and safety (regulations, certification requirements)
  • Basics methods of reliability analysis (FMEA, fault tree, functional hazard assessment)
  • Reliability analysis of electrical and mechanical systems


Literature
  • CS 25.1309
  • SAE ARP 4754
  • SAE ARP 4761

Module M1744: Selected Topics of Aeronautical Systems Engineering (Alternative A: 6 LP)

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Advanced Training Course SE-ZERT (L2739) Project-/problem-based Learning 2 3
Airline Operations (L1310) Lecture 3 3
Fatigue & Damage Tolerance (L0310) Lecture 2 3
Flight Guidance (L0848) Lecture 2 2
Flight Guidance (L0854) Recitation Section (large) 1 1
Airport Operations (L1276) Lecture 3 3
Airport Planning (L1275) Lecture 2 2
Airport Planning (L1469) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Lightweight Design Practical Course (L1258) Project-/problem-based Learning 3 3
Aviation Security (L1549) Lecture 2 2
Aviation Security (L1550) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Aviation and Environment (L2376) Lecture 3 3
Mechanisms, Systems and Processes of Materials Testing (L0950) Lecture 2 2
Mission Management (L2374) Lecture 2 2
Mission Management (L2375) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Turbo Jet Engines (L0908) Lecture 2 3
Structural Mechanics of Fibre Reinforced Composites (L1514) Lecture 2 3
Structural Mechanics of Fibre Reinforced Composites (L1515) Recitation Section (large) 1 1
System Simulation (L1820) Lecture 2 2
System Simulation (L1821) Recitation Section (large) 1 2
Materials Testing (L0949) Lecture 2 2
Reliability in Engineering Dynamics (L0176) Lecture 2 2
Reliability in Engineering Dynamics (L1303) Recitation Section (small) 1 2
Reliability of Aircraft Systems (L0749) Lecture 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Frank Thielecke
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge in:

  • Mathematics
  • Mechanics
  • Thermodynamics
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Hydraulics
  • Control Systems
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
  • Students are able to find their way through selected special areas within systems engineering, air transportation system and material science 
  • Students are able to explain basic models and procedures in selected special areas.
  • Students are able to interrelate scientific and technical knowledge.
Skills

Students are able to apply basic methods in selected areas of engineering.

Personal Competence
Social Competence
Autonomy

Students can chose independently, in which fields they want to deepen their knowledge and skills through the election of courses.

Workload in Hours Depends on choice of courses
Credit points 6
Assignment for the Following Curricula Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Aircraft Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L2739: Advanced Training Course SE-ZERT
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 120 min
Lecturer Prof. Ralf God
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
Literature

INCOSE Systems Engineering Handbuch - Ein Leitfaden für Systemlebenszyklus-Prozesse und -Aktivitäten, GfSE (Hrsg. der deutschen Übersetzung), ISBN 978-3-9818805-0-2.

ISO/IEC 15288 System- und Software-Engineering - System-Lebenszyklus-Prozesse (Systems and Software Engineering - System Life Cycle Processes).

Course L1310: Airline Operations
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick, Dr. Karl Echtermeyer
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  1. Introdution and overview
  2. Airline business models
  3. Interdependencies in flight planning (network management, slot management, netzwork structures, aircraft circulation)
  4. Operative flight preparation (weight & balance, payload/range, etc.)
  5. fleet policy
  6. Aircraft assessment and fleet planning
  7. Airline organisation
  8. Aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul
Literature

Volker Gollnick, Dieter Schmitt: The Air Transport System, Springer Berlin Heidelberg New York, 2014

Paul Clark: “Buying the Big Jets”, Ashgate 2008

Mike Hirst: The Air Transport System, AIAA, 2008

Course L0310: Fatigue & Damage Tolerance
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 45 min
Lecturer Dr. Martin Flamm
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content Design principles, fatigue strength, crack initiation and crack growth, damage calculation, counting methods, methods to improve fatigue strength, environmental influences
Literature Jaap Schijve, Fatigue of Structures and Materials. Kluver Academic Puplisher, Dordrecht, 2001 E. Haibach. Betriebsfestigkeit Verfahren und Daten zur Bauteilberechnung. VDI-Verlag, Düsseldorf, 1989
Course L0848: Flight Guidance
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

Introduction and motivation Flight guidance principles (airspace structures, organization of air navigation services, etc.)

Cockpit systems and Avionics (cockpit design, cockpit equipment, displays, computers and bus systems)

Principles of flight measurement techniques (Measurement of position (geometric methods, distance measurement, direction measurement) Determination of the aircraft attitude (magnetic field- and inertial sensors) Measurement of speed

Principles of Navigation

Radio navigation

Satellite navigation

Airspace surveillance (radar systems)

Commuication systems

Integrated Navigation and Guidance Systems

Literature

Rudolf Brockhaus, Robert Luckner, Wolfgang Alles: "Flugregelung", Springer Berlin Heidelberg New York, 2011

Holger Flühr: "Avionik und Flugsicherungssysteme", Springer Berlin Heidelberg New York, 2013

Volker Gollnick, Dieter Schmitt "Air Transport Systems", Springer Berlin Heidelberg New York, 2016

R.P.G. Collinson „Introduction to Avionics”, Springer Berlin Heidelberg New York 2003

Course L0854: Flight Guidance
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L1276: Airport Operations
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick, Peter Willems (geb. Bießlich)
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content FA-F Flight Operations Flight Operations - Production Infrastructures Operations Planning Master plan Airport capacity Ground handling Terminal operations
Literature Richard de Neufville, Amedeo Odoni: Airport Systems, McGraw Hill, 2003
Course L1275: Airport Planning
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick, Dr. Ulrich Häp
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  1. Introduction, definitions, overviewg
  2. Runway systems
  3. Air space strucutres around airports
  4. Airfield lightings, marking and information
  5. Airfield and terminal configuration
Literature

N. Ashford, Martin Stanton, Clifton Moore: Airport Operations, John Wiley & Sons, 1991

Richard de Neufville, Amedeo Odoni: Airport Systems, Aviation Week Books, MacGraw Hill, 2003



Course L1469: Airport Planning
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick, Dr. Ulrich Häp
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L1258: Lightweight Design Practical Course
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Lecturer Prof. Dieter Krause
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

Development of a sandwich structure made of fibre reinforced plastics

  • getting familiar with fibre reinforced plastics as well as lightweight design
  • Design of a sandwich structure made of fibre reinforced plastics using finite element analysis (FEA)
  • Determination of material properties based on sample tests
  • manufacturing of the structure in the composite lab
  • Testing of the developed structure
  • Concept presentation
  • Self-organised teamwork
Literature
  • Schürmann, H., „Konstruieren mit Faser-Kunststoff-Verbunden“, Springer, Berlin, 2005.
  • Puck, A., „Festigkeitsanalsyse von Faser-Matrix-Laminaten“, Hanser, München, Wien, 1996.
  • R&G, „Handbuch Faserverbundwerkstoffe“, Waldenbuch, 2009.
  • VDI 2014 „Entwicklung von Bauteilen aus Faser-Kunststoff-Verbund“
  • Ehrenstein, G. W., „Faserverbundkunststoffe“, Hanser, München, 2006.
  • Klein, B., „Leichtbau-Konstruktion", Vieweg & Sohn, Braunschweig, 1989.
  • Wiedemann, J., „Leichtbau Band 1: Elemente“, Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, 1986.
  • Wiedemann, J., „Leichtbau Band 2: Konstruktion“, Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, 1986.
  • Backmann, B.F., „Composite Structures, Design, Safety and Innovation”, Oxford (UK), Elsevier, 2005.
  • Krause, D., „Leichtbau”,  In: Handbuch Konstruktion, Hrsg.: Rieg, F., Steinhilper, R., München, Carl Hanser Verlag, 2012.
  • Schulte, K., Fiedler, B., „Structure and Properties of Composite Materials”, Hamburg, TUHH - TuTech Innovation GmbH, 2005.
Course L1549: Aviation Security
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 90 Minuten
Lecturer Prof. Ralf God
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

The objective of the lecture with the corresponding exercise is the acquisition of knowledge about tasks and measures for protection against attacks on the security of the commercial air transport system. Tasks and measures will be elicited in the context of the three system components man, technology and organization.

The course teaches the basics of aviation security. Aviation security is a necessary prerequisite for an economically successful air transport system. Risk management for the entire system can only be successful in an integrated approach, considering man, technology and organization:
• Historical development 
• The special role of air transport 
• Motive and attack vectors 
• The human factor 
• Threats and risk 
• Regulations and law 
• Organization and implementation of aviation security tasks 
• Passenger and baggage checks 
• Cargo screening and secure supply chain 
• Safety technologies

Literature

- Skript zur Vorlesung
- Giemulla, E.M., Rothe B.R. (Hrsg.): Handbuch Luftsicherheit. Universitätsverlag TU Berlin, 2011
- Thomas, A.R. (Ed.): Aviation Security Management. Praeger Security International, 2008

Course L1550: Aviation Security
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 90 Minuten
Lecturer Prof. Ralf God
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

The objective of the lecture with the corresponding exercise is the acquisition of knowledge about tasks and measures for protection against attacks on the security of the commercial air transport system. Tasks and measures will be elicited in the context of the three system components man, technology and organization.

The course teaches the basics of aviation security. Aviation security is a necessary prerequisite for an economically successful air transport system. Risk management for the entire system can only be successful in an integrated approach, considering man, technology and organization:
• Historical development 
• The special role of air transport 
• Motive and attack vectors 
• The human factor 
• Threats and risk 
• Regulations and law 
• Organization and implementation of aviation security tasks 
• Passenger and baggage checks 
• Cargo screening and secure supply chain 
• Safety technologies

Literature

- Skript zur Vorlesung

- Giemulla, E.M., Rothe B.R. (Hrsg.): Handbuch Luftsicherheit. Universitätsverlag TU Berlin, 2011

- Thomas, A.R. (Ed.): Aviation Security Management. Praeger Security International, 2008

Course L2376: Aviation and Environment
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

The lecture provides the necessary basics and methods for understanding the interactions between air traffic and the environment, both in terms of the effects of weather / climate on flying and with regard to the effects of air traffic on pollutant emissions, noise and climate.

The following topics are covered:

  • Atmospheric physics / chemistry
    • Structure and statics
    • Dynamics (water cycle, formation of weather events, high and low pressure areas, wind, gusts and turbulence)
    • Cloud physics (thermodynamics, contrails)
    • Radiation physics (energy balance, greenhouse effect)
    • Photochemistry (ozone chemistry)
  • Impact of weather on flying
    • Atmospheric influences on flight performance
    • Flight planning
    • Disturbances due to weather, e.g. thunderstorms, winter weather (icing), clear air turbulence, visibility
    • Effects of climate change and adaptation
  • Effects of air traffic on the environment and climate
    • Aviation pollutant emissions
    • Effect of emissions on concentrations in the atmosphere
    • Climate metrics / models and background scenarios
    • Emissions inventories
  • Mitigation measures
    • Technological measures, e.g. climate-optimized aircraft design
    • Alternative fuels
    • Operational measures, e.g. climate-optimized flight planning
    • Environmental policy measures, e.g. EU-ETS, CORSIA
    • Potentials and comparison, concept of eco-efficiency
  • Local environmental impacts
    • Local air quality (particulate matter, other emissions near the ground)
    • Noise (noise sources, noise metrics, noise impact, measurement, certification, psychoacoustics, noise mitigation)
    • Health effects
  • Aspects of sustainability
    • Other aspects, including life cycle emissions, disposal/recycling
    • Relation to global goals, e.g. United Nations goals for sustainable development, Paris climate agreement


Literature
  • Ruijgrok, G.: Elements of Aircraft Pollution, Delft University Press, 2005
  • Friedrich, R., Reis, S.: Emissions of Air Pollutants, Springer 2004
  • Janic, M.: The Sustainability of Air Transportation, Ashgate, 2007
  • Schumann, U. (ed.): Atmospheric Physics: Background - Methods - Trends, Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2012
  • Spiridonov, V., Curic, M.: Fundamentals of Meteorology, Springer, 2021
  • Kaltschmitt, M., Neuling, U.: Biokerosene - Status and Prospects, Springer, 2018
  • Roedel, W., Wagner, T.: Physik unserer Umwelt: Die Atmosphäre, Springer, 2017
  • W. Bräunling: Flugzeugtriebwerke. Springer-Verlag Berlin, Deutschland, 2009
  • G. Brüning, X. Hafer, G. Sachs: Flugleistungen, Springer, 1993
Course L0950: Mechanisms, Systems and Processes of Materials Testing
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 90 Minuten
Lecturer Dr. Jan Oke Peters
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

Application, analysis and discussion of basic and advanced testing methods to ensure correct selection of applicable testing procedure for investigation of part/materials deficiencies

  • Stress-strain relationships
  • Strain gauge application
  • Visko elastic behavior
  • Tensile test (strain hardening, necking, strain rate)
  • Compression test, bending test, torsion test
  • Crack growth upon static loading (J-Integral)                                
  • Crack growth upon cyclic loading (micro- und macro cracks)
  • Effect of notches
  • Creep testing (physical creep test, influence of stress and temperature, Larson Miller parameter)
  • Wear testing
  • Non destructive testing application for overhaul of jet engines
Literature
  • E. Macherauch: Praktikum in Werkstoffkunde, Vieweg
  • G. E. Dieter: Mechanical Metallurgy, McGraw-Hill            
  • R. Bürgel: Lehr- und Übungsbuch Festigkeitslehre, Vieweg                        
  • R. Bürgel: Werkstoffe sícher beurteilen und richtig einsetzen, Vieweg
Course L2374: Mission Management
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
Literature

Brockhaus, Alles, Luckner: Flugregelung, Springer Verlag, 2011

R.P.G Collinson: Introduction to Avionics Systems, Springer Verlag, 2011

Course L2375: Mission Management
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Lecturer Prof. Volker Gollnick
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L0908: Turbo Jet Engines
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 45 min
Lecturer Dr. Burkhard Andrich
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Cycle of the gas turbine
  • Thermodynamics of gas turbine components
  • Wing-, grid- and stage-sizing
  • Operating characteristics of gas turbine components
  • Sizing criteria’s for jet engines
  • Development trends of gas turbines and jet engines
  • Maintenance of jet engines


Literature
  • Bräunling: Flugzeugtriebwerke
  • Engmann: Technologie des Fliegens
  • Kerrebrock: Aircraft Engines and Gas Turbines


Course L1514: Structural Mechanics of Fibre Reinforced Composites
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Lecturer Prof. Benedikt Kriegesmann
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

Classical laminate theory

Rules of mixture

Failure mechanisms and criteria of composites

Boundary value problems of isotropic and anisotropic shells

Stability of composite structures

Optimization of laminated composites

Modelling composites in FEM

Numerical multiscale analysis of textile composites   

Progressive failure analysis   

Literature
  • Schürmann, H., „Konstruieren mit Faser-Kunststoff-Verbunden“, Springer, Berlin, aktuelle Auflage.
  • Wiedemann, J., „Leichtbau Band 1: Elemente“, Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, , aktuelle Auflage.
  • Reddy, J.N., „Mechanics of Composite Laminated Plates and Shells”, CRC Publishing, Boca Raton et al., current edition.
  • Jones, R.M., „Mechanics of Composite Materials“, Scripta Book Co., Washington, current edition.
  • Timoshenko, S.P., Gere, J.M., „Theory of elastic stability“, McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., New York, current edition.
  • Turvey, G.J., Marshall, I.H., „Buckling and postbuckling of composite plates“, Chapman and Hall, London, current edition.
  • Herakovich, C.T., „Mechanics of fibrous composites“, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, current edition.
  • Mittelstedt, C., Becker, W., „Strukturmechanik ebener Laminate”, aktuelle Auflage.
Course L1515: Structural Mechanics of Fibre Reinforced Composites
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Lecturer Prof. Benedikt Kriegesmann
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L1820: System Simulation
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Lecturer Dr. Stefan Wischhusen
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

Lecture about equation-based, physical modelling using the modelling language Modelica and the free simulation tool OpenModelica.

  • Instruction and modelling of physical processes
  • Modelling and limits of model
  • Time constant, stiffness, stability, step size
  • Terms of object orientated programming
  • Differential equations of simple systems
  • Introduction into Modelica
  • Introduction into simulation tool
  • Example:Hydraulic systems and heat transfer
  • Example: System with different subsystems
Literature

[1]    Modelica Association: "Modelica Language Specification - Version 3.4", Linköping,  Sweden, 2017                                                                                                               
[2]    M. Tiller:  “Modelica by Example", http://book.xogeny.com, 2014.

[3]    M. Otter, H. Elmqvist, et al.: "Objektorientierte Modellierung Physikalischer Systeme",  at- Automatisierungstechnik (german), Teil 1 - 17, Oldenbourg Verlag, 1999 - 2000.

[4]    P. Fritzson: "Principles of Object-Oriented Modeling and Simulation with Modelica 3.3", Wiley-IEEE Press, New York, 2015.

[5]    P. Fritzson: “Introduction to Modeling and Simulation of Technical and Physical  Systems with Modelica”, Wiley, New York, 2011.

Course L1821: System Simulation
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Lecturer Dr. Stefan Wischhusen
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L0949: Materials Testing
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 90 Minuten
Lecturer Dr. Jan Oke Peters
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content


Application and analysis of basic mechanical as well as non-destructive testing of materials  

  • Determination elastic constants                                                                                                                    
  • Tensile test
  • Fatigue test (testing with constant stress, strain, or plastiv strain amplitude, low and high cycle fatigue, mean stress effect)
  • Crack growth upon static loading (stress intensity factor, fracture toughness)
  • Creep test
  • Hardness test
  • Charpy impact test
  • Non destructive testing
Literature

E. Macherauch: Praktikum in Werkstoffkunde, Vieweg
G. E. Dieter: Mechanical Metallurgy, McGraw-Hill

Course L0176: Reliability in Engineering Dynamics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 90 min.
Lecturer NN
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

Method for calculation and testing of reliability of dynamic machine systems 

  • Modeling
  • System identification
  • Simulation
  • Processing of measurement data
  • Damage accumulation
  • Test planning and execution
Literature

Bertsche, B.: Reliability in Automotive and Mechanical Engineering. Springer, 2008. ISBN: 978-3-540-33969-4

Inman, Daniel J.: Engineering Vibration. Prentice Hall, 3rd Ed., 2007. ISBN-13: 978-0132281737

Dresig, H., Holzweißig, F.: Maschinendynamik, Springer Verlag, 9. Auflage, 2009. ISBN 3540876936.

VDA (Hg.): Zuverlässigkeitssicherung bei Automobilherstellern und Lieferanten. Band 3 Teil 2, 3. überarbeitete Auflage, 2004. ISSN 0943-9412

Course L1303: Reliability in Engineering Dynamics
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Lecturer NN
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L0749: Reliability of Aircraft Systems
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 90 Minuten
Lecturer Prof. Frank Thielecke, Dr. Andreas Vahl, Dr. Uwe Wieczorek
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Functions of reliability and safety (regulations, certification requirements)
  • Basics methods of reliability analysis (FMEA, fault tree, functional hazard assessment)
  • Reliability analysis of electrical and mechanical systems


Literature
  • CS 25.1309
  • SAE ARP 4754
  • SAE ARP 4761

Specialization Maritime Technology

At the center of the specialization Maritime Techniques lies the acquisition of knowledge and skills to develop, calculate and evaluate shipboard and offshore structures and their components. This is done in modules on the topics of marine engine systems, marine auxiliary systems, ship vibrations, maritime technology and maritime systems, port construction and port planning, port logistics, maritime transport and marine geotechnics and numerics in electives. In addition, subjects in the Technical Supplement Course for TMBMS (according FSPO) are freely selectable.

Module M1157: Marine Auxiliaries

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Electrical Installation on Ships (L1531) Lecture 2 2
Electrical Installation on Ships (L1532) Recitation Section (large) 1 1
Auxiliary Systems on Board of Ships (L1249) Lecture 2 2
Auxiliary Systems on Board of Ships (L1250) Recitation Section (large) 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Christopher Friedrich Wirz
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students are able to

  • name the operating behaviour of consumers,
  • describe special requirements on the design of supply networks and to the electrical equipment in isolated networks, as e.g. onboard ships, offshore units, factories and emergency power supply systems,
  • explain power generation and distribution in isolated grids, wave generator systems on ships,
  • name requirements for network protection, selectivity and operational monitoring,
  • name the requirements regarding marine equipment and apply to product development, as well as
  • describe operating procedures of equipment components of standard and specialized ships and derive requirements for product development.
Skills

Students are able to

• calculate short-circuit currents, switchgear,

• design electrical propulsion systems for ships

• design additional machinery components, as well as

• to apply basic principles of hydraulics and to develop hydraulic systems.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to communicate and cooperate in a professional environment in the shipbuilding and component supply industry.

Autonomy

The widespread scope of gained knowledge enables the students to handle situations in their future profession independently and confidently.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Oral exam
Examination duration and scale 20 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L1531: Electrical Installation on Ships
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Günter Ackermann
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • performance in service of electrical consumers.
  • special requirements for power supply systems and for electrical equipment in isolated systems/networks e. g. aboard ships, offshore installations, factory systems and emergency power supply systems.
  • power generation and distribution in isolated networks, shaft generators for ships
  • calculation of short circuits and behaviour of switching devices
  • protective devices, selectivity monitoring
  • electrical Propulsion plants for ships
Literature

H. Meier-Peter, F. Bernhardt u. a.: Handbuch der Schiffsbetriebstechnik, Seehafen Verlag

(engl. Version: "Compendium Marine Engineering")

Gleß, Thamm: Schiffselektrotechnik, VEB Verlag Technik Berlin

Course L1532: Electrical Installation on Ships
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Günter Ackermann
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L1249: Auxiliary Systems on Board of Ships
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Christopher Friedrich Wirz
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Vorschriften zur Schiffsausrüstung
  • Ausrüstungsanlagen auf Standard-Schiffen
  • Ausrüstungsanlagen auf Spezial-Schiffen
  • Grundlagen und Systemtechnik der Hydraulik
  • Auslegung und Betrieb von Ausrüstungsanlagen
Literature
  • H. Meyer-Peter, F. Bernhardt: Handbuch der Schiffsbetriebstechnik
  • H. Watter: Hydraulik und Pneumatik
Course L1250: Auxiliary Systems on Board of Ships
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Christopher Friedrich Wirz
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
Literature

Siehe korrespondierende Vorlesung 




Module M1177: Maritime Technology and Maritime Systems

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Analysis of Maritime Systems (L0068) Lecture 2 2
Analysis of Maritime Systems (L0069) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Introduction to Maritime Technology (L0070) Lecture 2 2
Introduction to Maritime Technology (L1614) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Moustafa Abdel-Maksoud
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Solid knowledge and competences in mechanics, fluid dynamics and analysis (series, periodic functions, continuity, differentiability, integration, multiple variables, ordinaray and partial differential equations, boundary value problems, initial conditions and eigenvalue problems).


Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

After successful completion of this class, students should have an overview about phenomena and methods in ocean engineering and the ability to apply and extend the methods presented.

In detail, the students should be able to

  • describe the different aspects and topics in Maritime Technology,
  • apply existing methods to problems in Maritime Technology,
  • discuss limitations in present day approaches and perspectives in the future,
  • Techniques for the analysis of offshore systems,
  • Modeling and evaluation of dynamic systems,
  • System-oriented thinking, decomposition of complex systems.
Skills The students learn the ability of apply and transfer existing methods and techniques on novel questions in maritime technologies. Furthermore, limits of the existing knowledge and future developments will be discussed.
Personal Competence
Social Competence

The processing of an exercise in a group of up to four students shall strengthen the communication and team-working skills and thus promote an important working technicque of subsequent working days. The collaboration has to be illustrated in a community presentation of the results.


Autonomy

The course contents are absorbed in an exercise work in a group and individually checked in a final exam in which a self-reflection of the learned is expected without tools.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 180 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L0068: Analysis of Maritime Systems
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Moustafa Abdel-Maksoud, Dr. Alexander Mitzlaff
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  1. Hydrostatic analysis
    • Buoyancy,
    • Stability,
  2. Hydrodynamic analysis
    • Froude-Krylov force
    • Morison's equation,
    • Radiation and diffraction
    • transparent/compact structures
  3. Evaluation of offshore structures: Reliability techniques (security, reliability, disposability)
    • Short-term statistics
    • Long-term statistics and extreme events
Literature
  • G. Clauss, E. Lehmann, C. Östergaard. Offshore Structures Volume I: Conceptual Design and Hydrodynamics. Springer Verlag Berlin, 1992
  • E. V. Lewis (Editor), Principles of Naval Architecture ,SNAME, 1988
  • Journal of Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering
  • Proceedings of International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering
  • S. Chakrabarti (Ed.), Handbook of Offshore Engineering, Volumes 1-2, Elsevier, 2005
  • S. K. Chakrabarti, Hydrodynamics of Offshore Structures , WIT Press, 2001


Course L0069: Analysis of Maritime Systems
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Moustafa Abdel-Maksoud, Dr. Alexander Mitzlaff
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L0070: Introduction to Maritime Technology
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Walter Kuehnlein, Dr. Sven Hoog
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

1. Introduction

  • Ocean Engineering and Marine Research
  • The potentials of the seas
  • Industries and occupational structures

2. Coastal and offshore Environmental Conditions

  • Physical and chemical properties of sea water and sea ice
  • Flows, waves, wind, ice
  • Biosphere

3. Response behavior of Technical Structures

4. Maritime Systems and Technologies

  • General Design and Installation of Offshore-Structures
  • Geophysical and Geotechnical Aspects
  • Fixed and Floating Platforms
  • Mooring Systems, Risers, Pipelines
  • Energy conversion: Wind, Waves, Tides
Literature
  • Chakrabarti, S., Handbook of Offshore Engineering, vol. I/II, Elsevier 2005.
  • Gerwick, B.C., Construction of Marine and Offshore Structures, CRC-Press 1999.
  • Wagner, P., Meerestechnik, Ernst&Sohn 1990.
  • Clauss, G., Meerestechnische Konstruktionen, Springer 1988.
  • Knauss, J.A., Introduction to Physical Oceanography, Waveland 2005.
  • Wright, J. et al., Waves, Tides and Shallow-Water Processes, Butterworth 2006.
  • Faltinsen, O.M., Sea Loads on Ships and Offshore Structures, Cambridge 1999.
Course L1614: Introduction to Maritime Technology
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Dr. Sven Hoog
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1240: Fatigue Strength of Ships and Offshore Structures

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Fatigue Strength of Ships and Offshore Structures (L1521) Lecture 2 3
Fatigue Strength of Ships and Offshore Structures (L1522) Recitation Section (small) 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Sören Ehlers
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Structural analysis of ships and/or offshore structures and fundamental knowledge in mechanics and mechanics of materials 

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students are able to

  • describe fatigue loads and stresses, as well as
  • describe structural behaviour under cyclic loads. 
Skills

Students are able to calculate life prediction based on the S-N approach as well as life prediction based on the crack propagation.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to communicate and cooperate in a professional environment in the shipbuilding and component supply industry. 

Autonomy

The widespread scope of gained knowledge enables the students to handle situations in their future profession independently and confidently.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Oral exam
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Ship and Offshore Technology: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L1521: Fatigue Strength of Ships and Offshore Structures
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Wolfgang Fricke
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

1.) Introduction
2.) Fatigue loads and stresses
3.) Structural behaviour under cyclic loads
- Structural behaviour under constant amplitude loading
- Influence factors on fatigue strength
- Material behaviour under contant amplitude loading
- Special aspects of welded joints
- Structural behaviour under variable amplitude loading
4.) Life prediction based on the S-N approach
- Damage accumulation hypotheses
- nominal stress approach
- structural stress approach
- notch stress approach
- notch strain approach
- numerical analyses
5.) Life prediction based on the crack propagation
- basic relationships in fracture mechanics
- description of crack propagation
- numerical analysis
- safety against unstable fracture

Literature Siehe Vorlesungsskript
Course L1522: Fatigue Strength of Ships and Offshore Structures
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Wolfgang Fricke
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M0663: Marine Geotechnics

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Marine Geotechnics (L0548) Lecture 1 2
Marine Geotechnics (L0549) Recitation Section (large) 2 2
Steel Structures in Foundation and Hydraulic Engineering (L1146) Lecture 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Jürgen Grabe
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

complete modules: Geotechnics I-III, Mathematics I-III

courses: Soil laboratory course

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
Skills
Personal Competence
Social Competence
Autonomy
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Geotechnical Engineering: Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Structural Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Cities: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Environment: Elective Compulsory
Water and Environmental Engineering: Specialisation Water: Elective Compulsory
Course L0548: Marine Geotechnics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Jürgen Grabe
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Geotechnical investigation an description of the seabed
  • Foundations of Offshore-Constructions
  • cCliff erosion
  • Sea dikes
  • Port structures
  • Flood protection structures
Literature
  • EAK (2002): Empfehlungen für Küstenschutzbauwerke
  • EAU (2004): Empfehlungen des Arbeitsausschusses Uferbauwerke
  • Poulos H.G. (1988): Marine Geotechnics. Unwin Hyman, London
  • Wagner P. (1990): Meerestechnik: Eine Einführung für Bauingenieure. Ernst & Sohn, Berlin
Course L0549: Marine Geotechnics
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Jürgen Grabe
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L1146: Steel Structures in Foundation and Hydraulic Engineering
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Frank Feindt
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content Design of a sheet pile wall, design of a combined sheet pile wall, piles, walings, connections, fatigue
Literature EAU 2012, EA-Pfähle, EAB

Module M1132: Maritime Transport

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Maritime Transport (L0063) Lecture 2 3
Maritime Transport (L0064) Recitation Section (small) 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Carlos Jahn
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students are able to…

  • present the actors involved in the maritime transport chain with regard to their typical tasks;
  • name common cargo types in shipping and classify cargo to the corresponding categories;
  • explain operating forms in maritime shipping, transport options and management in transport networks;
  • weigh the advantages and disadvantages of the various modes of hinterland transport and apply them in practice;
  • present relevant factors for the location planning of ports and seaport terminals and discuss them in a problem-oriented way;
  • estimate the potential of digitisation in maritime shipping.


Skills

The students are able to...

  • determine the mode of transport, actors and functions of the actors in the maritime supply chain;
  • identify possible cost drivers in a transport chain and recommend appropriate proposals for cost reduction;
  • record, map and systematically analyse material and information flows of a maritime logistics chain, identify possible problems and recommend solutions;
  • perform risk assessments of human disruptions to the supply chain;
  • analyse accidents in the field of maritime logistics and evaluating their relevance in everyday life;
  • deal with current research topics in the field of maritime logistics in a differentiated way; 
  • apply different process modelling methods in a hitherto unknown field of activity and to work out the respective advantages.
Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to...

  • discuss and organise extensive work packages in groups;
  • document and present the elaborated results.
Autonomy

The students are capable to...

  • research and select technical literature, including standards and guidelines;
  • submit own shares in an extensive written elaboration in small groups in due time.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
No 15 % Subject theoretical and practical work Teilnahme an einem Planspiel und anschließende schriftliche Ausarbeitung
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Production and Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Infrastructure and Mobility: Elective Compulsory
Renewable Energies: Specialisation Wind Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L0063: Maritime Transport
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Carlos Jahn
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

The general tasks of maritime logistics include the planning, design, implementation and control of material and information flows in the logistics chain ship - port - hinterland. This includes technology assessment, selection, dimensioning and implementation as well as the operation of technologies.

The aim of the course is to provide students with knowledge of maritime transport and the actors involved in the maritime transport chain. Typical problem areas and tasks will be dealt with, taking into account the economic development. Thus, classical problems as well as current developments and trends in the field of maritime logistics are considered.

In the lecture, the components of the maritime logistics chain and the actors involved will be examined and risk assessments of human disturbances on the supply chain will be developed. In addition, students learn to estimate the potential of digitisation in maritime shipping, especially with regard to the monitoring of ships. Further content of the lecture is the different modes of transport in the hinterland, which students can evaluate after completion of the course regarding their advantages and disadvantages.

Literature
  • Brinkmann, Birgitt. Seehäfen: Planung und Entwurf. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag, 2005.
  • Schönknecht, Axel. Maritime Containerlogistik: Leistungsvergleich von Containerschiffen in intermodalen Transportketten. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag, 2009.
  • Stopford, Martin. Maritime Economics Routledge, 2009
Course L0064: Maritime Transport
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Carlos Jahn
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

The exercise lesson bases on the haptic management game MARITIME. MARITIME focuses on providing knowledge about structures and processes in a maritime transport network. Furthermore, the management game systematically provides process management methodology and also promotes personal skills of the participants.


Literature
  • Stopford, Martin. Maritime Economics Routledge, 2009
  • Brinkmann, Birgitt. Seehäfen: Planung und Entwurf. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag, 2005.
  • Schönknecht, Axel. Maritime Containerlogistik: Leistungsvergleich von Containerschiffen in intermodalen Transportketten. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag, 2009.


Module M1133: Port Logistics

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Port Logistics (L0686) Lecture 2 3
Port Logistics (L1473) Recitation Section (small) 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Carlos Jahn
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge none
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Th

After completing the module, students can...

  • reflect on the development of seaports (in terms of the functions of the ports and the corresponding terminals, as well as the relevant operator models) and place them in their historical context;
  • explain and evaluate different types of seaport terminals and their specific characteristics (cargo, transhipment technologies, logistic functional areas);
  • analyze common planning tasks (e.g. berth planning, stowage planning, yard planning) at seaport terminals and develop suitable approaches (in terms of methods and tools) to solve these planning tasks;
  • identify future developments and trends regarding the planning and control of innovative seaport terminals and discuss them in a problem-oriented manner.


Skills

After completing the module, students will be able to...

  • recognize functional areas in ports and seaport terminals;
  • define and evaluate suitable operating systems for container terminals;
  • perform static calculations with regard to given boundary conditions, e.g. required capacity (parking spaces, equipment requirements, quay wall length, port access) on selected terminal types;
  • reliably estimate which boundary conditions influence common logistics indicators in the static planning of selected terminal types and to what extent.



Personal Competence
Social Competence

After completing the module, students can...

  • transfer the acquired knowledge to further questions of port logistics;
  • discuss and successfully organize extensive task packages in small groups;
  • in small groups, document work results in writing in an understandable form and present them to an appropriate extent.


Autonomy

After completing the module, the students are able to...

  • research and select specialist literature, including standards, guidelines and journal papers, and to develop the contents independently;
  • submit own parts in an extensive written elaboration in small groups in due time and to present them jointly within a fixed time frame.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
No 15 % Written elaboration
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 120 minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula Civil Engineering: Specialisation Coastal Engineering: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Production and Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Infrastructure and Mobility: Elective Compulsory
Renewable Energies: Specialisation Wind Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L0686: Port Logistics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Carlos Jahn
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

Port Logistics deals with the planning, control, execution and monitoring of material flows and the associated information flows in the port system and its interfaces to numerous actors inside and outside the port area.

The extraordinary role of maritime transport in international trade requires very efficient ports. These must meet numerous requirements in terms of economy, speed, safety and the environment. Against this background, the lecture Port Logistics deals with the planning, control, execution and monitoring of material flows and the associated information flows in the port system and its interfaces to numerous actors inside and outside the port area. The aim of the lecture Port Logistics is to convey an understanding of structures and processes in ports. The focus will be on different types of terminals, their characteristical layouts and the technical equipment used as well as the ongoing digitization and interaction of the players involved.

In addition, renowned guest speakers from science and practice will be regularly invited to discuss some lecture-relevant topics from alternative perspectives.

The following contents will be conveyed in the lectures:

  • Instruction of structures and processes in the port
  • Planning, control, implementation and monitoring of material and information flows in the port
  • Fundamentals of different terminals, characteristical layouts and the technical equipment used
  • Handling of current issues in port logistics
Literature
  • Alderton, Patrick (2013). Port Management and Operations.
  • Biebig, Peter and Althof, Wolfgang and Wagener, Norbert (2017). Seeverkehrswirtschaft: Kompendium.
  • Brinkmann, Birgitt. Seehäfen: Planung und Entwurf. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag, 2005.
  • Büter, Clemens (2013). Außenhandel: Grundlagen internationaler Handelsbeziehungen.
  • Gleissner, Harald and Femerling, J. Christian (2012). Logistik: Grundlagen, Übungen, Fallbeispiele.
  • Jahn, Carlos; Saxe, Sebastian (Hg.). Digitalization of Seaports - Visions of the Future,  Stuttgart: Fraunhofer Verlag, 2017.
  • Kummer, Sebastian (2019). Einführung in die Verkehrswirtschaft
  • Lun, Y.H.V. and Lai, K.-H. and Cheng, T.C.E. (2010). Shipping and Logistics Management.
  • Woitschützke, Claus-Peter (2013). Verkehrsgeografie.
Course L1473: Port Logistics
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Carlos Jahn
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

The content of the exercise is the independent preparation of a scientific paper plus an accompanying presentation on a current topic of port logistics. The paper deals with current topics of port logistics. For example, the future challenges in sustainability and productivity of ports, the digital transformation of terminals and ports or the introduction of new regulations by the International Maritime Organization regarding the verified gross weight of containers. Due to the international orientation of the event, the paper is to be prepared in English.


Literature
  • Alderton, Patrick (2013). Port Management and Operations.
  • Biebig, Peter and Althof, Wolfgang and Wagener, Norbert (2017). Seeverkehrswirtschaft: Kompendium.
  • Brinkmann, Birgitt. Seehäfen: Planung und Entwurf. (2005) Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag.
  • Büter, Clemens (2013). Außenhandel: Grundlagen internationaler Handelsbeziehungen.
  • Gleissner, Harald and Femerling, J. Christian (2012). Logistik: Grundlagen, Übungen, Fallbeispiele.
  • Jahn, Carlos; Saxe, Sebastian (Hg.) (2017) Digitalization of Seaports - Visions of the Future,  Stuttgart: Fraunhofer Verlag.
  • Kummer, Sebastian (2019). Einführung in die Verkehrswirtschaft
  • Lun, Y.H.V. and Lai, K.-H. and Cheng, T.C.E. (2010). Shipping and Logistics Management.
  • Woitschützke, Claus-Peter (2013). Verkehrsgeografie.

Module M1021: Marine Diesel Engine Plants

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Marine Diesel Engine Plants (L0637) Lecture 3 4
Marine Diesel Engine Plants (L0638) Recitation Section (large) 1 2
Module Responsible Prof. Christopher Friedrich Wirz
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students can

• explain different types four / two-stroke engines and assign types to given engines,

• name definitions and characteristics, as well as

• elaborate on special features of the heavy oil operation, lubrication and cooling.

Skills

Students can

• evaluate the interaction of ship, engine and propeller,

• use relationships between gas exchange, flushing, air demand, charge injection and combustion for the design of systems,

• design waste heat recovery, starting systems, controls, automation, foundation and design machinery spaces , and

• apply evaluation methods for excited motor noise and vibration.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to communicate and cooperate in a professional environment in the shipbuilding and component supply industry. 

Autonomy

The widespread scope of gained knowledge enables the students to handle situations in their future profession independently and confidently.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Oral exam
Examination duration and scale 20 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Energy Systems: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Energy Systems: Specialisation Marine Engineering: Compulsory
Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L0637: Marine Diesel Engine Plants
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Christopher Friedrich Wirz
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Historischer Überblick
  • Bauarten von Vier- und Zweitaktmotoren als Schiffsmotoren
  • Vergleichsprozesse, Definitionen, Kenndaten
  • Zusammenwirken von Schiff, Motor und Propeller
  • Ausgeführte Schiffsdieselmotoren
  • Gaswechsel, Spülverfahren, Luftbedarf
  • Aufladung von Schiffsdieselmotoren
  • Einspritzung und Verbrennung
  • Schwerölbetrieb
  • Schmierung
  • Kühlung
  • Wärmebilanz
  • Abwärmenutzung
  • Anlassen und Umsteuern
  • Regelung, Automatisierung, Überwachung
  • Motorerregte Geräusche und Schwingungen
  • Fundamentierung
  • Gestaltung von Maschinenräumen
Literature
  • D. Woodyard: Pounder’s Marine Diesel Engines
  • H. Meyer-Peter, F. Bernhardt: Handbuch der Schiffsbetriebstechnik
  • K. Kuiken: Diesel Engines
  • Mollenhauer, Tschöke: Handbuch Dieselmotoren
  • Projektierungsunterlagen der Motorenhersteller
Course L0638: Marine Diesel Engine Plants
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Christopher Friedrich Wirz
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1175: Special Topics of Ship Propulsionand Hydrodynamics of High Speed Water Vehicles

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Hydrodynamics of High Speed Water Vehicles (L1593) Lecture 3 3
Special Topics of Ship Propulsion (L1589) Lecture 3 3
Module Responsible Prof. Moustafa Abdel-Maksoud
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge on ship resistance, ship propulsion and propeller theory 

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
  • Understand present research questions in the field of ship propulsion
  • Explain the present state of the art for the topics considered
  • Apply given methodology to approach given problems
  • Evaluate the limits of the present ship propulsion systems
  • Identify possibilities to extend present methods and technologies
  • Evaluate the feasibility of further developments
Skills

Students are able to
• select and apply suitable computing and simulation methods to determine the hydrodynamic characteristics of ship propulsion systems
• model the behavior of ship propulsion systems under different operation conditions by using simplified methods
• evaluate critically the investigation results of experimental or numerical investigations

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are able to

  • solve problems in heterogeneous groups and to document the corresponding results
  • share new knowledge with group members
Autonomy

Students are able to assess their knowledge by means of exercises and case studies

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 180 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L1593: Hydrodynamics of High Speed Water Vehicles
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Moustafa Abdel-Maksoud
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content
  1. Resistance components of different high speed water vehicles
  2. Propulsion units of high speed vehicles
  3. Waves resistance in shallow and deep water
  4. Surface effect ships (SES)
  5. Hydrofoil supported vehicles
  6. Semi-displacement vehicles
  7. Planning vehicles
  8. Slamming
  9. Manoeuvrability
Literature

Faltinsen,O. M., Hydrodynamics of High-Speed Marine Vehicles, Cambridge University Press, UK, 2006

Course L1589: Special Topics of Ship Propulsion
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Moustafa Abdel-Maksoud
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content
  1. Propeller Geometry 
  2. Cavitation 
  3. Model Tests, Propeller-Hull Interaction
  4. Pressure Fluctuation / Vibration
  5. Potential Theory 
  6. Propeller Design 
  7. Controllable Pitch Propellers 
  8. Ducted Propellers 
  9. Podded Drives
  10. Water Jet Propulsion
  11. Voith-Schneider-Propulsors
Literature
  • Breslin, J., P., Andersen, P., Hydrodynamics of Ship Propellers, Cambridge Ocean Technology, Series 3,
        Cambridge University Press, 1996.
  • Lewis, V. E., ed., Principles of Naval Architecture, Volume II Resistance, Propulsion and Vibration,
        SNAME,  1988.
  • N. N., International Confrrence Waterjet 4, RINA London, 2004
  • N. N., 1st International Conference on Technological Advances in Podded Propulsion, Newcastle, 2004 

Module M1182: Technical Elective Course for TMBMS (according to Subject Specific Regulations)

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Module Responsible Prof. Robert Seifried
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge see FSPO
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge see FSPO
Skills see FSPO
Personal Competence
Social Competence see FSPO
Autonomy see FSPO
Workload in Hours Depends on choice of courses
Credit points 6
Assignment for the Following Curricula Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Aircraft Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Materials Science: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Bio- and Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Robotics and Computer Science: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Simulation Technology: Elective Compulsory

Module M1233: Numerical Methods in Ship Design

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Numerical Methods in Ship Design (L1271) Lecture 2 4
Numerical Methods in Ship Design (L1709) Project-/problem-based Learning 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Stefan Krüger
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
Skills
Personal Competence
Social Competence
Autonomy
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Oral exam
Examination duration and scale 45 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L1271: Numerical Methods in Ship Design
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 92, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Stefan Krüger
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

The lecture starts with the definition of the early design phase and the importance of first principle approaches. The
reasons for process reengineering when such kinds of methods are introduced is demonstrated. Several numerical
modelling techniques are introduced and discussed for the following design relevant topics:
- Hullform representation, fairing and interpolation
- Hullform design by modifying parent hulls
- Modelling of subdivison
- Volumetric and stability calculations
- Mass distributions and longitudinal strength
- Hullform Design by CFD- techniques
- Propulsor and Rudder Design by CFD Techniques

Literature Skript zur Vorlesung.
Course L1709: Numerical Methods in Ship Design
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Stefan Krüger
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1146: Ship Vibration

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Ship Vibration (L1528) Lecture 2 3
Ship Vibration (L1529) Recitation Section (small) 2 3
Module Responsible Dr. Rüdiger Ulrich Franz von Bock und Polach
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Mechanis I - III
Structural Analysis of Ships I
Fundamentals of Ship Structural Design

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students can reproduce the acceptance criteria for vibrations on ships; they can explain the methods for the calculation of natural frequencies and forced vibrations of sructural components and the entire hull girder; they understand the effect of exciting forces of the propeller and main engine and methods for their determination

Skills

Students are capable to apply methods for the calculation of natural frequencies and exciting forces and resulting vibrations of ship structures including their assessment; they can model structures for the vibration analysis

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to communicate and cooperate in a professional environment in the shipbuilding and component supply industry. 

Autonomy

Students are able to detect vibration-prone components on ships, to model the structure, to select suitable calculation methods and to assess the results

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 3 hours
Assignment for the Following Curricula Energy Systems: Specialisation Marine Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Ship and Offshore Technology: Core qualification: Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L1528: Ship Vibration
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Rüdiger Ulrich Franz von Bock und Polach
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

1. Introduction; assessment of vibrations
2. Basic equations
3. Beams with discrete / distributed masses
4. Complex beam systems
5. Vibration of plates and Grillages
6. Deformation method / practical hints / measurements
7. Hydrodynamic masses
8. Spectral method
9. Hydrodynamic masses acc. to Lewis
10. Damping
11. Shaft systems
12. Propeller excitation
13. Engines

Literature Siehe Vorlesungsskript
Course L1529: Ship Vibration
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Rüdiger Ulrich Franz von Bock und Polach
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

1. Introduction; assessment of vibrations
2. Basic equations
3. Beams with discrete / distributed masses
4. Complex beam systems
5. Vibration of plates and Grillages
6. Deformation method / practical hints / measurements
7. Hydrodynamic masses
8. Spectral method
9. Hydrodynamic masses acc. to Lewis
10. Damping
11. Shaft systems
12. Propeller excitation
13. Engines

Literature Siehe Vorlesungsskript

Module M1268: Linear and Nonlinear Waves

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Linear and Nonlinear Waves (L1737) Project-/problem-based Learning 4 6
Module Responsible Prof. Norbert Hoffmann
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Good Knowledge in Mathematics, Mechanics and Dynamics.
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge Students are able to reflect existing terms and concepts in Wave Mechanics and to develop and research new terms and concepts.
Skills Students are able to apply existing methods and procesures of Wave Mechanics and to develop novel methods and procedures.
Personal Competence
Social Competence Students can reach working results also in groups.
Autonomy Students are able to approach given research tasks individually and to identify and follow up novel research tasks by themselves.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 2 Hours
Assignment for the Following Curricula Mechatronics: Specialisation System Design: Elective Compulsory
Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L1737: Linear and Nonlinear Waves
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 4
CP 6
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Lecturer Prof. Norbert Hoffmann, Dr. Antonio Papangelo
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content Introduction into the Dynamics of Linear and Nonlinear Waves.
Literature

G.B. Witham, Linear and Nonlinear Waves. Wiley 1999.

C.C. Mei, Theory and Applications of Ocean Surface Waves. World Scientific 2004.

Module M1148: Selected topics in Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Outfitting and Operation of Special Purpose Offshore Ships (L1896) Lecture 2 3
Design of Underwater Vessels (L0670) Lecture 2 3
Lattice-Boltzmann methods for the simulation of free surface flows (L2066) Lecture 2 3
Modeling and Simulation of Maritime Systems (L2013) Project-/problem-based Learning 2 3
Offshore Wind Parks (L0072) Lecture 2 3
Ship Acoustics (L1605) Lecture 2 3
Ship Dynamics (L0352) Lecture 2 3
Selected Topics of Experimental and Theoretical Fluiddynamics (L0240) Lecture 2 3
Technical Elements and Fluid Mechanics of Sailing Ships (L0873) Lecture 2 3
Technology of Naval Surface Vessels (L0765) Lecture 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Sören Ehlers
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge none
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge
  • Students are able to find their way through selected special areas within naval architecture and ocean engineering
  • Students are able to explain basic models and procedures in selected special areas.
  • Students are able to interrelate scientific and technical knowledge.
Skills

Students are able to apply basic methods in selected areas of ship and ocean engineering.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to communicate and cooperate in a professional environment in the shipbuilding and component supply industry. 

Autonomy

Students can chose independently, in which fields they want to deepen their knowledge and skills through the election of courses.

Workload in Hours Depends on choice of courses
Credit points 6
Assignment for the Following Curricula Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L1896: Outfitting and Operation of Special Purpose Offshore Ships
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Lecturer Dr. Hendrik Vorhölter
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

The lecture is separated into two parts. In the first part some basic skills necessary for the design of offshore vessels and their equipment will be repeated and where necessary deepened. In particular, the specialties which are common for the ma-jority of offshore vessels will be addressed: rules and regulations, determination of operational limits as well as mooring and dynamic positioning.

In the second part of the lecture single types of special offshore vessels and their equipment and outfitting will be addressed. For each type the specific requirements on design and operation will be discussed. Furthermore, the students shall be en-gaged with the preparation of short presentation about the specific ship types as incentive for the respective unit. In particular, it is planned to discuss the following ship types in the lecture:
- Anchor handling and plattform supply vessels
- Cable -and pile lay vessels
- Jack-up vessels
- Heavy lift and offshore construction vessels
- Dredgers and rock dumping vessels
- Diving support vessels

Literature

Chakrabarti, S. (2005): Handbook of Offshore Engineering. Elsevier. Amsterdam, London

Volker Patzold (2008): Der Nassabbau. Springer. Berlin

Milwee, W. (1996): Modern Marine Salvage. Md Cornell Maritime Press. Centreville.

DNVGL-ST-N001 „Marine Operations and Marin Warranty“

IMCA M 103 “The Design and Operation of Dynamically Positioned Vessels” 2007-12

IMCA M 182 “The Safe Operation of Dynamically Positioned Offshore Supply Vessels” 2006-03

IMCA M 187 “Lifting Operations” 2007-10

IMCA SEL 185 “Transfer of Personnel to and from Offshore Vessels” 2010-03

Course L0670: Design of Underwater Vessels
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Lecturer Peter Hauschildt
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

The  lectures will give an overview about the design of underwater vessels. The Topics are:

1.) Special requirements on the design of modern, konventional submarines

2.) Design history

3.) Generals description of submarines

4.) Civil submersibles

5.) Diving, trim, stability

6.) Rudders and Propulsion systems

7.) Air Independent propulsion

8.) Signatures

9.) Hydrodynamics and CFD

10.) Weapon- and combatmangementsystems

11.) Safety and rescue

12.) Fatigue and shock

13.) Ships technical systems

14.) Electricals Systems and automation

15.) Logisics

16.) Accomodation

Some of the lectures will be Hheld in form of a excursion to ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems in Kiel

Literature Gabler, Ubootsbau
Course L2066: Lattice-Boltzmann methods for the simulation of free surface flows
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Lecturer Dr. Christian F. Janßen
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

This lecture addresses Lattice Boltzmann Methods for the simulation of free surface flows. After an introduction to the basic concepts of kinetic methods (LGCAs, LBM, ….), recent LBM extensions for the simulation of free-surface flows are discussed. Parallel to the lecture, selected maritime free-surface flow problems are to be solved numerically.

Literature

Krüger et al., “The Lattice Boltzmann Method - Principles and Practice”, Springer

Zhou, “Lattice Boltzmann Methods for Shallow Water Flows”, Springer

Janßen, “Kinetic approaches for the simulation of non-linear free surface flow problems in civil and environmental engineering”, PhD thesis, TU Braunschweig, 2010.

Course L2013: Modeling and Simulation of Maritime Systems
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Lecturer Dr. Christian F. Janßen
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

In the scope of this lecture, students learn to model and solve selected maritime problems with the help of numerical programs and scripts.

First, basic concepts of computational modeling are explained, from the physical modeling and discretization to the implementation and actual numerical solution of the problem. Then, available tools for the implementation and solution process are discussed, including high-level compiled and interpreted programming languages and computer algebra systems (e.g., Python; Matlab, Maple). In the second half of the class, selected maritime problems will be discussed and subsequently solved numerically by the students.

Literature

“Introduction to Computational Modeling Using C and Open-Source Tools” (J.M. Garrido, Chapman and Hall); “Introduction to Computational Models with Python” (J.M. Garrido, Chapman and Hall); “Programming Fundamentals” (MATLAB Handbook, MathWorks); 

Course L0072: Offshore Wind Parks
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 45 min
Lecturer Dr. Alexander Mitzlaff
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Nonlinear Waves: Stability, pattern formation, solitary states 
  • Bottom Boundary layers: wave boundary layers, scour, stability of marine slopes
  • Ice-structure interaction
  • Wave and tidal current energy conversion


Literature
  • Chakrabarti, S., Handbook of Offshore Engineering, vol. I&II, Elsevier 2005.
  • Mc Cormick, M.E., Ocean Wave Energy Conversion, Dover 2007.
  • Infeld, E., Rowlands, G., Nonlinear Waves, Solitons and Chaos, Cambridge 2000.
  • Johnson, R.S., A Modern Introduction to the Mathematical Theory of Water Waves, Cambridge 1997.
  • Lykousis, V. et al., Submarine Mass Movements and Their Consequences, Springer 2007.
  • Nielsen, P., Coastal Bottom Boundary Layers and Sediment Transport, World Scientific 2005.
  • Research Articles.


Course L1605: Ship Acoustics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Lecturer Dr. Dietrich Wittekind
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content
Literature
Course L0352: Ship Dynamics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Klausur
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Lecturer Prof. Moustafa Abdel-Maksoud
Language DE
Cycle SoSe
Content

Maneuverability of ships

  • Equations of motion
  • Hydrodynamic forces and moments
  • Linear equations and their solutions
  • Full-scale trials for evaluating the maneuvering performance
  • Regulations for maneuverability
  • Rudder


Seakeeping

  • Representation of harmonic processes
  • Motions of a rigid ship in regular waves
  • Flow forces on ship cross sections
  • Strip method
  • Consequences induced by ship motion in regular waves
  • Behavior of ships in a stationary sea state
  • Long-term distribution of seaway influences


Literature
  • Abdel-Maksoud, M., Schiffsdynamik, Vorlesungsskript, Institut für Fluiddynamik und Schiffstheorie,  Technische Universität Hamburg-Harburg, 2014
  • Abdel-Maksoud, M., Ship Dynamics, Lecture notes, Institute for Fluid Dynamic and Ship Theory, Hamburg University of  Technology, 2014
  • Bertram, V., Practical Ship Design Hydrodynamics, Butterworth-Heinemann, Linacre House - Jordan Hill, Oxford, United Kingdom, 2000
  • Bhattacharyya, R., Dynamics of Marine Vehicles, John Wiley & Sons, Canada,1978
  • Brix, J. (ed.), Manoeuvring Technical Manual, Seehafen-Verlag, Hamburg, 1993
  • Claus, G., Lehmann, E., Östergaard, C). Offshore Structures, I+II, Springer-Verlag. Berlin Heidelberg, Deutschland, 1992
  • Faltinsen, O. M., Sea Loads on Ships and Offshore Structures, Cambridge University Press, United Kingdom, 1990
  • Handbuch der Werften, Deutschland, 1986
  • Jensen, J. J., Load and Global Response of Ships, Elsevier Science, Oxford, United Kingdom, 2001
  • Lewis, Edward V. (ed.), Principles of Naval Architecture - Motion in Waves and Controllability, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Jersey City, NJ, 1989
  • Lewandowski, E. M., The Dynamics of Marine Craft: Maneuvering and Seakeeping, World Scientific, USA, 2004
  • Lloyd, A., Ship Behaviour in Rough Weather, Gosport, Chichester, Sussex, United Kingdom, 1998


Course L0240: Selected Topics of Experimental and Theoretical Fluiddynamics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Lecturer Prof. Thomas Rung
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content Will be announced at the beginning of the lecture. Exemplary topics are 
  1. methods and procedures from experimental fluid mechanics
  2. rational Approaches towards flow physics modelling 
  3. selected topics of theoretical computation fluid dynamics
  4. turbulent flows 
Literature

Wird in der Veranstaltung bekannt gegeben. To be announced during the lecture.

Course L0873: Technical Elements and Fluid Mechanics of Sailing Ships
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Lecturer Prof. Thomas Rung, Peter Schenzle
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

Principles of Sailing Mechanics:

- Sailing: Propulsion from relative motion

- Lifting foils: Sails, wings, rudders, fins, keels

- Wind climate: global, seasonal, meteorological, local

- Aerodynamics of sails and sailing rigs

- Hydrodynamics of Hulls and fins

Technical Elements of Sailing:

- Traditional and modern sail types

- Modern and unconventional wind propulsors

- Hull forms and keel-rudder-configurations

- Sailing performance Prediction (VPP)

- Auxiliary wind propulsion (motor-sailing)

Configuration of Sailing Ships:

- Balancing hull and sailing rig

- Sailing-boats and -yachts

- Traditional Tall Sailing Ships

- Modern Wind-Ships

Literature

- Vorlesungs-Manuskript mit Literatur-Liste: Verteilt zur Vorlesung
- B. Wagner: Fahrtgeschwindigkeitsberechnung für Segelschiffe, IfS-Rep. 132, 1967
- B. Wagner: Sailing Ship Research at the Hamburg University, IfS-Script 2249, 1976
- A.R. Claughton et al.: Sailing Yacht Design 1&2, University of Southampton, 1998
- L. Larsson, R.E. Eliasson: Principles of Yacht Design, Adlard Coles Nautical, London, 2000
- K. Hochkirch: Entwicklung einer Messyacht, Diss. TU Berlin, 2000

Course L0765: Technology of Naval Surface Vessels
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Examination Form Mündliche Prüfung
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Lecturer Dr. Martin Schöttelndreyer
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Operational scenarios, tasks, capabilities, requirements
  • Product and process models, rules and regulations
  • Survivability: threats, signatures, counter measures
  • Design characteristics
  • Energy and propulsion systems
  • Command and combat systems
  • Vulnerability: residual strength, residual functionality
Literature

Th. Christensen, H.-D. Ehrenberg, H. Götte, J. Wessel: Entwurf von Fregatten und Korvetten, in: H. Keil (Hrsg.), Handbuch der Werften, Bd. XXV, Schiffahrts-Verlag "Hansa" C. Schroedter & Co., Hamburg (2000)

16th International Ship and Offshore Structures Congress: Committee V.5 - Naval Ship Design (2006)

P. G. Gates: Surface Warships - An Introduction to Design Principles, Brassey’s Defence Publishers, London (1987)

Module M1232: Arctic Technology

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Ice Engineering (L1607) Lecture 2 2
Ice Engineering (L1615) Recitation Section (small) 1 2
Ship structural design for arctic conditions (L1575) Project-/problem-based Learning 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Sören Ehlers
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge none
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The challenges and requirements due to ice can be explained. Ice loads can be explained and ice strengthening can be understood.

Skills

The challenges and requirements due to ice can be assessed and the accuracy of these assessment can be evaluated. Calculation models to assess ice loads can be used and a structure can be designed accordingly.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students are capable to present their structural design and discuss their decisions constructively in a group. 

Autonomy

Independent and individual assignment tasks can be carried out and presented whereby the capabilities to both, present and defend, the skills and findings will be achieved.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Oral exam
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Ship and Offshore Technology: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L1607: Ice Engineering
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Walter Kuehnlein
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
  1. Ice, Ice Properties, Ice Failure Modes and Challenges and Requirements due to Ice
    • Introduction, what is/means ice engineering
    • Description of different kinds of ice, main ice properties and different ice failure modes
    • Why is ice so different compared to open water
    • Presentation of design challenges and requirements for structures and systems in ice covered waters
  2. Ice Load Determination and Ice Model Testing
    • Overview of different empirical equations for simple determination of ice loads
    • Discussion and interpretation of the different equations and results
    • Introduction to ice model tests
    • What are the requirements for ice model tests, what parameters have to be scaled
    • What can be simulated and how to use the results of such ice model tests
  3. Computational Modelling of Ice-Structure Interaction Processes
    • Dynamic fracture and continuum mechanics for modelling ice-structure interaction processes
    • Alternative numerical crack propagation modelling methods. Examples of cohesive element models for real life structures.
    • Discussion of contribution of ice properties, hydrodynamics and rubble.
  4. Ice Design Philosophies and Perspectives
    • What has to be considered when designing structures or systems for ice covered waters
    • What are the main differences compared to open water design
    • Ice Management
    • What are the main ice design philosophies and why is an integrated concept so important for ice

Learning Objectives

The course will provide an introduction into ice engineering. Different kinds of ice and their different failure modes including numerical methods for ice load simulations are presented. Main design issues including design philosophies for structures and systems for ice covered waters are introduced. The course shall enable the attendees to understand the fundamental challenges due to ice covered waters and help them to understand ice engineering reports and presentations.

Literature
  • Proceedings OMAE
  • Proceedings POAC
  • Proceedings ATC
Course L1615: Ice Engineering
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Dr. Walter Kuehnlein
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L1575: Ship structural design for arctic conditions
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Sören Ehlers, Dr. Rüdiger Ulrich Franz von Bock und Polach
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content The structural design under ice loads will be carried out for an individual case
Literature FSICR, IACS PC and assorted publications

Module M1165: Ship Safety

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Ship Safety (L1267) Lecture 2 4
Ship Safety (L1268) Recitation Section (large) 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Stefan Krüger
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Ship Design, Hydrostatics, Statistical Processes
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The student shall lean to integrate safety aspects into the ship design process. This includes the undertsnding and
application of existing rules as well as the understanding of the sfatey concept and level which is targeted by a rule.
Further, methods of demonstrating equivalent safety levels are introduced.

Skills

he lectures starts with an overview about general safety concepts for technical systems. The maritime safety
organizations are introduced, their responses and duties. Then, the gerenal difference between prescriptive and
performance based rules is tackled. Foer different examples in ship design, the influence of the rules on the deign is
illustrated . Further, limitations of saftey rules with respect to the physical background are shown. Concepts of
demonstrating equivalent levels of safety by direct calculations are discussed. The following fields will be treated.

- Freeboard, water- and weathertight subdivisions, openings

- all aspects of intact stability, including special problems such as grain code

- damage stability for passenger vessels including Stockholm agreement

- damage stbility fopr cargo vessels

- on board stability, inclining experiment and stability booklet

- Relevant manoevering information

Personal Competence
Social Competence The student learns to take responsibilty for the safety of his designn.
Autonomy Responsible certification of technical designs.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 180 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering: Core qualification: Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L1267: Ship Safety
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 92, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Stefan Krüger
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

The lectures starts with an overview about general safety concepts for technical systems. The maritime safety
organizations are introduced, their responses and duties. Then, the gerenal difference between prescriptive and
performance based rules is tackled. Foer different examples in ship design, the influence of the rules on the deign is
illustrated . Further, limitations of saftey rules with respect to the physical background are shown. Concepts of
demonstrating equivalent levels of safety by direct calculations are discussed. The following fields will be treated.

- Freeboard, water- and weathertight subdivisions, openings

- all aspects of intact stability, including special problems such as grain code

- damage stability for passenger vessels including Stockholm agreement

- damage stbility fopr cargo vessels

- on board stability, inclining experiment and stability booklet

- Relevant manoevering information

Literature SOLAS, LOAD LINES, CODE ON INTACT STABILITY. Alle IMO, London.
Course L1268: Ship Safety
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Stefan Krüger
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1178: Manoeuvrability and Shallow Water Ship Hydrodynamics

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Manoeuvrability of Ships (L1597) Lecture 2 3
Shallow Water Ship Hydrodynamics (L1598) Lecture 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Moustafa Abdel-Maksoud
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

B.Sc. Schiffbau

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students lern the motion equation and how to describe hydrodynamic forces. They'll will be able to develop methods for analysis of manoeuvring behaviour of ships and explaining the Nomoto equation. The students will know the common model tests as well as their assets and drawbacks.

Furthermore, the students lern the basics of assessment and prognosis of ship manoeuvrabilit. Basics of characteristics of flows around ships in shallow water regarding ship propulsion and manoeuvrability will be aquired.



Skills
Personal Competence
Social Competence
Autonomy
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 180 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Ship and Offshore Technology: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L1597: Manoeuvrability of Ships
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Moustafa Abdel-Maksoud
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • coordinates & degrees of freedom
  • governing equations of motion
  • hydrodynamic forces & moments
  • ruder forces
  • navigation based on linearised eq.of motion(exemplary solutions, yaw stability)
  • manoeuvering test (constraint & unconstraint motion)
  • slender body approximation

Learning Outcomes

Introduction into basic concepts for the assessment and prognosis ship manoeuvrabilit.

Ability to develop methods for analysis of manoeuvring behaviour of ships.

Literature
  • Crane, C. L. H., Eda, A. L., Principles of Naval Architecture, Chapter 9, Controllability, SNAME, New York, 1989
  • Brix, J., Manoeuvring Technical Manual, Seehafen Verlag GmbH, Hamburg 1993 
  • Söding, H., Manövrieren , Vorlesungsmanuskript, Institut für Fluiddynamik und Schiffstheorie, TUHH, Hamburg, 1995
Course L1598: Shallow Water Ship Hydrodynamics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Moustafa Abdel-Maksoud, Dr. Norbert Stuntz
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Special Aspects of Shallow Water Hydrodynamics, Vertical and Horizontal Constraints, Irregularities in Channel Bed
  • Fundamental Equations of Shallow Water Hydrodynamics
  • Approximation of Shallow Water Waves, Boussinesq’s Approximation
  • Ship Waves in Deep Water and under critical, non-critical and supercritical Velocities
  • Solitary Wves, Critical Speed Range, Extinction of Waves
  • Aspects of Ship motions in Canals with limited water depth
Literature
  • PNA (1988): Principle of Naval Architecture, Vol. II, ISBN 0-939773-01-5
  • Schneekluth (1988): Hydromechanik zum Schiffsentwurf
  • Jiang, T. (2001): Ship Waves in Shallow Water, Fortschritt-Berichte VDI, Series 12, No 466, ISBN 3-18-346612-0

Specialization Materials Science

The focus of the specialization „materials technology“ is the acquisition of in-depth knowledge and skills in materials technology. One main focus is on the creation of modern material models. Modules in the electives are the material modeling and Multi-scale modeling phenomena and methods in materials science, polymer processing, as well as plastics and composites. In addition, subjects in the Technical Supplement Course for TMBMS (according FSPO) are freely selectable.

Module M1342: Polymers

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Structure and Properties of Polymers (L0389) Lecture 2 3
Processing and design with polymers (L1892) Lecture 2 3
Module Responsible Dr. Hans Wittich
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Basics: chemistry / physics / material science
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students can use the knowledge of plastics and define the necessary testing and analysis.

They can explain the complex relationships structure-property relationship and

the interactions of chemical structure of the polymers, including to explain neighboring contexts (e.g. sustainability, environmental protection).

Skills

Students are capable of

- using standardized calculation methods in a given context to mechanical properties (modulus, strength) to calculate and evaluate the different materials.

-  selecting appropriate solutions for mechanical recycling problems and sizing example stiffness, corrosion resistance.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students can

- arrive at funded work results in heterogenius groups and document them.

- provide appropriate feedback and handle feedback on their own performance constructively.


Autonomy

Students are able to

- assess their own strengths and weaknesses.

- assess their own state of learning in specific terms and to define further work steps on this basis.

- assess possible consequences of their professional activity.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 180 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Materials Science: Specialisation Engineering Materials: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Materials Science: Elective Compulsory
Course L0389: Structure and Properties of Polymers
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Hans Wittich
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

- Structure and properties of polymers

- Structure of macromolecules

  Constitution, Configuration, Conformation, Bonds, Synthesis, Molecular weihght distribution

- Morphology

  amorph, crystalline, blends

- Properties

  Elasticity, plasticity, viscoelacity

- Thermal properties

- Electrical properties

- Theoretical modelling

- Applications

Literature Ehrenstein: Polymer-Werkstoffe, Carl Hanser Verlag
Course L1892: Processing and design with polymers
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Bodo Fiedler, Dr. Hans Wittich
Language DE/EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

Manufacturing of Polymers: General Properties; Calendering; Extrusion; Injection Moulding; Thermoforming, Foaming; Joining

Designing with Polymers: Materials Selection; Structural Design; Dimensioning

Literature

Osswald, Menges: Materials Science of Polymers for Engineers, Hanser Verlag
Crawford: Plastics engineering, Pergamon Press
Michaeli: Einführung in die Kunststoffverarbeitung, Hanser Verlag

Konstruieren mit Kunststoffen, Gunter Erhard , Hanser Verlag

Module M1182: Technical Elective Course for TMBMS (according to Subject Specific Regulations)

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Module Responsible Prof. Robert Seifried
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge see FSPO
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge see FSPO
Skills see FSPO
Personal Competence
Social Competence see FSPO
Autonomy see FSPO
Workload in Hours Depends on choice of courses
Credit points 6
Assignment for the Following Curricula Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Aircraft Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Materials Science: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Bio- and Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Robotics and Computer Science: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Simulation Technology: Elective Compulsory

Module M1343: Structure and properties of fibre-polymer-composites

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Structure and properties of fibre-polymer-composites (L1894) Lecture 2 3
Structure and properties of fibre-polymer-composites (L2614) Project-/problem-based Learning 2 2
Structure and properties of fibre-polymer-composites (L2613) Recitation Section (large) 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Bodo Fiedler
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Basics: chemistry / physics / materials science
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students can use the knowledge of  fiber-reinforced composites (FRP) and its constituents to play (fiber / matrix) and define the necessary testing and analysis.

They can explain the complex relationships structure-property relationship and

the interactions of chemical structure of the polymers, their processing with the different fiber types, including to explain neighboring contexts (e.g. sustainability, environmental protection).

Skills

Students are capable of

  • using standardized calculation methods in a given context to mechanical properties (modulus, strength) to calculate and evaluate the different materials.
  • approximate sizing using the network theory of the structural elements implement and evaluate.
  • selecting appropriate solutions for mechanical recycling problems and sizing example stiffness, corrosion resistance.
Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students can

  • arrive at funded work results in heterogenius groups and document them.
  • provide appropriate feedback and handle feedback on their own performance constructively.


Autonomy

Students are able to

- assess their own strengths and weaknesses.

- assess their own state of learning in specific terms and to define further work steps on this basis.

- assess possible consequences of their professional activity.


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Energy Systems: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Materials Science: Specialisation Engineering Materials: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Core qualification: Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Materials: Compulsory
Renewable Energies: Specialisation Bioenergy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Renewable Energies: Specialisation Wind Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Renewable Energies: Specialisation Solar Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Materials Science: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L1894: Structure and properties of fibre-polymer-composites
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Bodo Fiedler
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

- Microstructure and properties of the matrix and reinforcing materials and their interaction
- Development of composite materials
- Mechanical and physical properties
- Mechanics of Composite Materials
- Laminate theory
- Test methods
- Non destructive testing
- Failure mechanisms
- Theoretical models for the prediction of properties
- Application

Literature Hall, Clyne: Introduction to Composite materials, Cambridge University Press
Daniel, Ishai: Engineering Mechanics of Composites Materials, Oxford University Press
Mallick: Fibre-Reinforced Composites, Marcel Deckker, New York
Course L2614: Structure and properties of fibre-polymer-composites
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Bodo Fiedler
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content
Literature
Course L2613: Structure and properties of fibre-polymer-composites
Typ Recitation Section (large)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Bodo Fiedler
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content
Literature

Module M1226: Mechanical Properties

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Mechanical Behaviour of Brittle Materials (L1661) Lecture 2 3
Dislocation Theory of Plasticity (L1662) Lecture 2 3
Module Responsible Dr. Erica Lilleodden
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basics in Materials Science I/II

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students can explain basic principles of crystallography, statics (free body diagrams, tractions) and thermodynamics (energy minimization, energy barriers, entropy)

Skills

Students are capable of using standardized calculation methods: tensor calculations, derivatives, integrals, tensor transformations

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students can provide appropriate feedback and handle feedback on their own performance constructively.

Autonomy

Students are able to

- assess their own strengths and weaknesses

- assess their own state of learning in specific terms and to define further work steps on this basis guided by teachers.

- work independently based on lectures and notes to solve problems, and to ask for help or clarifications when needed

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Materials Science: Core qualification: Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Materials: Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Materials Science: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L1661: Mechanical Behaviour of Brittle Materials
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Gerold Schneider
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

Theoretical Strength
Of a perfect crystalline material, theoretical critical shear stress

Real strength of brittle materials
Energy release reate, stress intensity factor, fracture criterion

Scattering of strength of brittle materials
Defect distribution, strength distribution, Weibull distribution

Heterogeneous materials I
Internal stresses, micro cracks, weight function,

Heterogeneous materials II
Toughening mechanisms: crack bridging, fibres

Heterogeneous materials III
Toughening mechanisms. Process zone

Testing methods to determine the fracture toughness of brittle materials

R-curve, stable/unstable crack growth, fractography

Thermal shock

Subcritical crack growth)
v-K-curve, life time prediction

Kriechen

Mechanical properties of biological materials

Examples of use for a mechanically reliable design of ceramic components

Literature

D R H Jones, Michael F. Ashby, Engineering Materials 1, An Introduction to Properties, Applications and Design, Elesevier

D.J. Green, An introduction to the mechanical properties of ceramics”, Cambridge University Press, 1998

B.R. Lawn, Fracture of Brittle Solids“, Cambridge University Press, 1993

D. Munz, T. Fett, Ceramics, Springer, 2001

D.W. Richerson, Modern Ceramic Engineering, Marcel Decker, New York, 1992

Course L1662: Dislocation Theory of Plasticity
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Erica Lilleodden
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

This class will cover the principles of dislocation theory from a physical metallurgy perspective, providing a fundamental understanding of the relations between the strength and of crystalline solids and distributions of defects.

We will review the concept of dislocations, defining terminology used, and providing an overview of important concepts (e.g. linear elasticity, stress-strain relations, and stress transformations) for theory development. We will develop the theory of dislocation plasticity through derived stress-strain fields, associated self-energies, and the induced forces on dislocations due to internal and externally applied stresses. Dislocation structure will be discussed, including core models, stacking faults, and dislocation arrays (including grain boundary descriptions). Mechanisms of dislocation multiplication and strengthening will be covered along with general principles of creep and strain rate sensitivity. Final topics will include non-FCC dislocations, emphasizing the differences in structure and corresponding implications on dislocation mobility and macroscopic mechanical behavior; and dislocations in finite volumes.

Literature

Vorlesungsskript

Aktuelle Publikationen

Bücher:

Introduction to Dislocations, by D. Hull and D.J. Bacon

Theory of Dislocations, by J.P.  Hirth and J. Lothe

Physical Metallurgy, by Peter Hassen

Module M1239: Experimental Micro- and Nanomechanics

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Experimental Micro- and Nanomechanics (L1673) Lecture 2 4
Experimental Micro- and Nanomechanics (L1674) Recitation Section (small) 1 2
Module Responsible Dr. Erica Lilleodden
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basics in Materials Science I/II, Mechanical Properties, Phenomena and Methods in Materials Science 

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students are able to describe the principles of mechanical behavior (e.g., stress, strain, modulus, strength, hardening, failure, fracture).

Students can explain the principles of characterization methods used for investigating microstructure (e.g., scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction)

They can describe the fundamental relations between microstructure and mechanical properties.

Skills

Students are capable of using standardized calculation methods to calculate and evaluate mechanical properties (modulus, strength) of different materials under varying loading states (e.g., uniaxial stress or plane strain).

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students can provide appropriate feedback and handle feedback on their own performance constructively.

Autonomy

Students are able to

- assess their own strengths and weaknesses

- assess their own state of learning in specific terms and to define further work steps on this basis guided by teachers.

-  to be able to work independently based on lectures and notes to solve problems, and to ask for help or clarifications when needed

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 138, Study Time in Lecture 42
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Materials Science: Specialisation Nano and Hybrid Materials: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Materials Science: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L1673: Experimental Micro- and Nanomechanics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 92, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Erica Lilleodden
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

This class will cover the principles of mechanical testing at the micron and nanometer scales. A focus will be made on metallic materials, though issues related to ceramics and polymeric materials will also be discussed. Modern methods will be explored, along with the scientific questions investigated by such methods.

  • Principles of micromechanics
    • Motivations for small-scale testing
    • Sample preparation methods for small-scale testing
    • General experimental artifacts and quantification of measurement resolution
  • Complementary structural analysis methods
    • Electron back scattered diffraction
    • Transmission electron microscopy
    • Micro-Laue diffraction
  • Nanoindentation-based testing
    • Principles of contact mechanics
    • Berkovich indentation
      • Loading geometry
      • Governing equations for analysis of stress & strain
      • Case study:
        • Indentation size effects
    • Microcompression
      • Loading geometry
      • Governing equations for analysis of stress & strain
      • Case study:
        • Size effects in yield strength and hardening
    • Microbeam-bending
      • Loading geometry
      • Governing equations for analysis of stress & strain                    
      • Case study:
        • Fracture strength & toughness

Literature

Vorlesungsskript

Aktuelle Publikationen

Course L1674: Experimental Micro- and Nanomechanics
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Dr. Erica Lilleodden
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1237: Methods in Theoretical Materials Science

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Methods in Theoretical Materials Science (L1677) Lecture 2 4
Methods in Theoretical Materials Science (L1678) Recitation Section (small) 1 2
Module Responsible Prof. Stefan Müller
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Knowledge of advanced mathematics like analysis, linear algebra, differential equations and complex functions, e.g., Mathematics I-IV
Knowledge of physics, particularly solid state physics, e.g., Materials Physics


Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The master students will be able to…

…explain how different modeling methods work.

…assess the field of application of individual methodological approaches.

…evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different methods.

The students are thereby able to assess which method is best suited to solve a scientific problem and what accuracy can be expected from the simulation results.

Skills

After completing the module, the students are able to…

…select the most suitable modeling method as a function of various parameters such as length scale, time scale, temperature, material type, etc..

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to discuss competently and adapted to the target group with experts from various fields including physics and materials science, for example at conferences or exhibitions. Further, this promotes their abilities to work in interdisciplinary groups.


Autonomy

The students are able to ...

…assess their own strengths and weaknesses.

…acquire the knowledge they need on their own.


Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 138, Study Time in Lecture 42
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Oral exam
Examination duration and scale
Assignment for the Following Curricula Materials Science: Specialisation Modeling: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Materials Science: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L1677: Methods in Theoretical Materials Science
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 92, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Stefan Müller
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

1. Introduction
1.1 Classification of Modelling Approaches and the Solid State

2. Quantum Mechanical Approaches
2.1 Electronic states : Atoms, Molecules, Solids
2.2 Density Functional Theory
2.3 Spin-Dynamics

3. Thermodynamic Approaches
3.1 Thermodynamic Potentials
3.2 Alloys
3.3 Cluster Expansion
3.4 Monte-Carlo-Methods

Literature

Solid State Physics, Ashcroft/Mermin, Saunders College

Computational Physics, Thijsen, Cambridge

Computational Materials Science, Ohno et al.. Springer

Materials Science and Engineering: An Introduction, Callister/Rethwisch, Edition 9, Wiley

Course L1678: Methods in Theoretical Materials Science
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Stefan Müller
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1238: Quantum Mechanics of Solids

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Quantum Mechanics of Solids (L1675) Lecture 2 4
Quantum Mechanics of Solids (L1676) Recitation Section (small) 1 2
Module Responsible Prof. Stefan Müller
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Knowledge of advanced mathematics like analysis, linear algebra, differential equations and complex functions, e.g., Mathematics I-IV
Knowledge of mechanics and physics, particularly solid state physics, e.g., Materials Physics


Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The master students will be able to explain…

…the basics of quantum mechanics.

… the importance of quantum physics for the description of materials properties.

… correlations between on quantum mechanics based phenomena between individual atoms and macroscopic properties of materials.

The master students will then be able to connect essential materials properties in engineering with materials properties on the atomistic scale in order to understand these connections.

Skills

After attending this lecture the students can …

…perform materials design on a quantum mechanical basis.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to discuss competently quantum-mechanics-based subjects with experts from fields such as physics and materials science.


Autonomy

The students are able to independently develop solutions to quantum mechanical problems. They can also acquire the knowledge they need to deal with more complex questions with a quantum mechanical background from the literature.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 138, Study Time in Lecture 42
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Oral exam
Examination duration and scale
Assignment for the Following Curricula Materials Science: Specialisation Nano and Hybrid Materials: Elective Compulsory
Materials Science: Specialisation Modeling: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Materials Science: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L1675: Quantum Mechanics of Solids
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 92, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Stefan Müller
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content

1. Introduction
1.1 Relevance of Quantum Mechanics
1.2 Classification of Solids

2. Foundations of Quantum Mechanics
2.1 Reminder : Elements of Classical Mechanics
2.2 Motivation for Quantum Mechanics
2.3 Particle-Wave Duality
2.4 Formalism

3. Elementary QM Problems
3.1 Onedimensional Problems of a Particle in a Potential
3.2 Two-Level System
3.3 Harmonic Oscillator
3.4 Electrons in a Magnetic Field
3.5 Hydrogen Atom

4. Quantum Effects in Condensed Matter
4.1 Preliminary
4.2 Electronic Levels
4.3 Magnetism
4.4 Superconductivity
4.5 Quantum Hall Effect

Literature

Physik für Ingenieure, Hering/Martin/Stohrer, Springer

Atom- und Quantenphysik, Haken/Wolf, Springer

Grundkurs Theoretische Physik 5|1, Nolting, Springer

Electronic Structure of Materials, Sutton, Oxford

Materials Science and Engineering: An Introduction, Callister/Rethwisch, Edition 9, Wiley

Course L1676: Quantum Mechanics of Solids
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 46, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Stefan Müller
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1199: Advanced Functional Materials

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Advanced Functional Materials (L1625) Seminar 2 6
Module Responsible Prof. Patrick Huber
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge in Materials Science, e.g. Materials Science I/II


Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students will be able to explain the properties of advanced materials along with their applications in technology, in particular metallic, ceramic, polymeric, semiconductor, modern composite materials (biomaterials) and nanomaterials.

Skills

The students will be able to select material configurations according to the technical needs and, if necessary, to design new materials considering architectural principles from the micro- to the macroscale. The students will also gain an overview on modern materials science, which enables them to select optimum materials combinations depending on the technical applications.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to present solutions to specialists and to develop ideas further.

Autonomy

The students are able to ...

  • assess their own strengths and weaknesses.
  • gather new necessary expertise by their own.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 152, Study Time in Lecture 28
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Presentation
Examination duration and scale 30 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Materials Science: Core qualification: Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Materials Science: Elective Compulsory
Course L1625: Advanced Functional Materials
Typ Seminar
Hrs/wk 2
CP 6
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 152, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Patrick Huber, Prof. Stefan Müller, Prof. Bodo Fiedler, Prof. Gerold Schneider, Prof. Jörg Weißmüller, Prof. Christian Cyron
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

1. Porous Solids - Preparation, Characterization and Functionalities
2. Fluidics with nanoporous membranes
3. Thermoplastic elastomers
4. Optimization of polymer properties by nanoparticles
5. Fiber composites in automotive
6. Modeling of materials based on quantum mechanics
7. Biomaterials

Literature

Aktuelle Publikationen aus der Fachliteratur werden während der Veranstaltung bekanntgegeben.

Module M1198: Materials Physics and Atomistic Materials Modeling

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Materials Physics (L1624) Lecture 2 2
Quantum Mechanics and Atomistic Materials Modeling (L1672) Lecture 2 2
Exercises in Materials Physics and Modeling (L2002) Recitation Section (small) 2 2
Module Responsible Prof. Patrick Huber
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Advanced mathematics, physics and chemistry for students in engineering or natural sciences
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students are able to 

- explain the fundamentals of condensed matter physics

- describe the fundamentals of the microscopic structure and mechanics, thermodynamics and optics of materials systems.

- to understand concept and realization of advanced methods in atomistic modeling as well as to estimate their potential and limitations.



Skills

After attending this lecture the students

  • can perform calculations regarding the thermodynamics, mechanics, electrical and optical properties of condensed matter systems
  • are able to transfer their knowledge to related technological and scientific fields, e.g. materials design problems.
  • can select appropriate model descriptions for specific materials science problems and are able to further develop simple models.


Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to present solutions to specialists and to develop ideas further.

Autonomy

Students are able to assess their knowldege continuously on their own by exemplified practice.

The students are able to assess their own strengths and weaknesses and define tasks independently.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Materials Science: Core qualification: Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Materials Science: Elective Compulsory
Course L1624: Materials Physics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Patrick Huber
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
Literature

Für den Elektromagnetismus:

  • Bergmann-Schäfer: „Lehrbuch der Experimentalphysik“, Band 2: „Elektromagnetismus“, de Gruyter

Für die Atomphysik:

  • Haken, Wolf: „Atom- und Quantenphysik“, Springer

Für die Materialphysik und Elastizität:

  • Hornbogen, Warlimont: „Metallkunde“, Springer


Course L1672: Quantum Mechanics and Atomistic Materials Modeling
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Robert Meißner
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

- Why atomistic materials modeling
- Newton's equations of motion and numerical approaches
- Ergodicity
- Atomic models
- Basics of quantum mechanics
- Atomic & molecular many-electron systems
- Hartree-Fock and Density-Functional Theory
- Monte-Carlo Methods
- Molecular Dynamics Simulations
- Phase Field Simulations

Literature

Begleitliteratur zur Vorlesung (sortiert nach Relevanz):

  1. Daan Frenkel & Berend Smit „Understanding Molecular Simulations“
  2. Mark E. Tuckerman „Statistical Mechanics: Theory and Molecular Simulations“
  3. Andrew R. Leach „Molecular Modelling: Principles and Applications“

Zur Vorbereitung auf den quantenmechanischen Teil der Klausur empfiehlt sich folgende Literatur

  1. Regine Freudenstein & Wilhelm Kulisch "Wiley Schnellkurs Quantenmechanik"


Course L2002: Exercises in Materials Physics and Modeling
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Robert Meißner, Prof. Patrick Huber
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
Literature

- Daan Frenkel & Berend Smit: Understanding Molecular Simulation from Algorithms to Applications

- Rudolf Gross und Achim Marx: Festkörperphysik

- Neil Ashcroft and David Mermin: Solid State Physics

Module M1151: Materials Modeling

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Material Modeling (L1535) Lecture 2 3
Material Modeling (L1536) Recitation Section (small) 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Christian Cyron
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basics of linear and nonlinear continuum mechanics as taught, e.g., in the modules Mechanics II and Continuum Mechanics (forces and moments, stress, linear and nonlinear strain, free-body principle, linear and nonlinear constitutive laws, strain energy)

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge The students can explain the fundamentals of multidimensional consitutive material laws
Skills The students can implement their own material laws in finite element codes. In particular, the students can apply their knowledge to various problems of material science and evaluate the corresponding material models.
Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to develop solutions, to present them to specialists and to develop ideas further.


Autonomy

The students are able to assess their own strengths and weaknesses. They can independently and on their own identify and solve problems in the area of materials modeling and acquire the knowledge required to this end.



Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 60 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Materials Science: Specialisation Modeling: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Materials Science: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Simulation Technology: Elective Compulsory
Course L1535: Material Modeling
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Christian Cyron
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

One of the most important questions when modeling mechanical systems in practice is how to model the behavior of the materials of their different components. In addition to simple isotropic elasticity in particular the following phenomena play key roles

- anisotropy (material behavior depending on direction, e.g., in fiber-reinforced materials)
- plasticity (permanent deformation due to one-time overload, e.g., in metal forming)
- viscoelasticity (absorption of energy, e.g., in dampers)
- creep (slow deformation under permanent load, e.g., in pipes)

This lecture briefly introduces the theoretical foundations and mathematical modeling of the above phenomena. It is complemented by exercises where simple examples problems are solved by calculations and where the implementation of the content of the lecture in computer simulations is explained. It will also briefly discussed how important material parameters can be determined from experimental data.

Literature
Course L1536: Material Modeling
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Christian Cyron
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1170: Phenomena and Methods in Materials Science

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Experimental Methods for the Characterization of Materials (L1580) Lecture 2 3
Phase equilibria and transformations (L1579) Lecture 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Jörg Weißmüller
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge in Materials Science, e.g. Werkstoffwissenschaft I/II


Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students will be able to explain the properties of advanced materials along with their applications in technology, in particular metallic, ceramic, polymeric, semiconductor, modern composite materials (biomaterials) and nanomaterials.

Skills

The students will be able to select material configurations according to the technical needs and, if necessary, to design new materials considering architectural principles from the micro- to the macroscale. The students will also gain an overview on modern materials science, which enables them to select optimum materials combinations depending on the technical applications.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

The students are able to present solutions to specialists and to develop ideas further.


Autonomy

The students are able to ...

  • assess their own strengths and weaknesses.
  • gather new necessary expertise by their own.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Materials Science: Core qualification: Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Materials: Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Materials Science: Elective Compulsory
Course L1580: Experimental Methods for the Characterization of Materials
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Jürgen Markmann, Prof. Patrick Huber
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Structural characterization by photons, neutrons and electrons (in particular X-ray and neutron scattering, electron microscopy, tomography)
  • Mechanical and thermodynamical characterization methods (indenter measurements, mechanical compression and tension tests, specific heat measurements)
  • Characterization of optical, electrical and magnetic properties (spectroscopy, electrical conductivity and magnetometry)


Literature

William D. Callister und David G. Rethwisch, Materialwissenschaften und Werkstofftechnik, Wiley&Sons, Asia (2011).

William D. Callister, Materials Science and Technology, Wiley& Sons, Inc. (2007).

Course L1579: Phase equilibria and transformations
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Jörg Weißmüller
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

Fundamentals of statistical physics, formal structure of phenomenological thermodynamics, simple atomistic models and free-energy functions of solid solutions and compounds. Corrections due to nonlocal interaction (elasticity, gradient terms). Phase equilibria and alloy phase diagrams as consequence thereof. Simple atomistic considerations for interaction energies in metallic solid solutions. Diffusion in real systems. Kinetics of phase transformations for real-life boundary conditions. Partitioning, stability and morphology at solidification fronts. Order of phase transformations; glass transition. Phase transitions in nano- and microscale systems.

Literature

D.A. Porter, K.E. Easterling, “Phase transformations in metals and alloys”, New York, CRC Press, Taylor & Francis, 2009, 3. Auflage

Peter Haasen, „Physikalische Metallkunde“ , Springer 1994

Herbert B. Callen, “Thermodynamics and an introduction to thermostatistics”, New York, NY: Wiley, 1985, 2. Auflage.

Robert W. Cahn und Peter Haasen, "Physical Metallurgy", Elsevier 1996

H. Ibach, “Physics of Surfaces and Interfaces” 2006, Berlin: Springer.

Specialization Product Development and Production

At the center of the specialization „product development and production“ is the acquisition of knowledge and skills for developing, designing and manufacturing of mechanical engineering products. This includes product planning, systematic and methodical development of solution concepts, the design and construction of products with special emphasis on component stress and cost considerations, to the derivation and creation of manufacturing documentation and the implementation in production.

Module M0815: Product Planning

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Product Planning (L0851) Lecture 3 3
Product Planning Seminar (L0853) Project-/problem-based Learning 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Cornelius Herstatt
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Good basic-knowledge of Business Administration

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Students will gain  insights into:

  • Product Planning
    • Process
    • Methods
  • Design thinking
    • Process
    • Methods
    • User integration
Skills

Students will gain deep insights into:

  • Product Planning
    • Process-related aspects
    • Organisational-related aspects
    • Human-Ressource related aspects
    • Working-tools, methods and instruments

Personal Competence
Social Competence
  • Interact within a team
  • Raise awareness for globabl issues
Autonomy
  • Gain access to knowledge sources
  • Interpret complex cases
  • Develop presentation skills
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement
Compulsory Bonus Form Description
Yes 20 % Subject theoretical and practical work
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 minutes
Assignment for the Following Curricula Global Innovation Management: Core qualification: Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation I. Electives Management: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Management: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L0851: Product Planning
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Cornelius Herstatt
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content

Product Planning Process

This integrated lecture is designed to understand major issues, activities and tools in the context of systematic product planning, a key activity for managing the front-end of innovation, i.e.:
•    Systematic scanning of markets for innovation opportunities
•    Understanding strengths/weakness and specific core competences of a firm as platforms for innovation
•    Exploring relevant sources for innovation (customers, suppliers, Lead Users, etc.)
•    Developing ideas for radical innovation, relying on the creativeness of employees, using techniques to stimulate creativity and creating a stimulating environment
•    Transferring ideas for innovation into feasible concepts which have a high market attractively

Voluntary presentations in the third hour (articles / case studies)

- Guest lectures by researchers 

- Lecture on Sustainability with frequent reference to current research

- Permanent reference to current research

Examination:

In addition to the written exam at the end of the module, students have to attend the PBL-exercises and prepare presentations in groups in order to pass the module. Additionally, students have the opportunity to present research papers on a voluntary base.  With these presentations it is possible to gain a bonus of max. 20% for the exam. However, the bonus is only valid if the exam is passed without the bonus.

Literature Ulrich, K./Eppinger, S.: Product Design and Development, 2nd. Edition, McGraw-Hill 2010
Course L0853: Product Planning Seminar
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Cornelius Herstatt
Language EN
Cycle WiSe
Content Seminar is integrative part of the Module Product Planning (for content see lecture) and can not be choosen independantly.
Literature See lecture information "Product Planning".

Module M0867: Production Planning & Control and Digital Enterprise

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
The Digital Enterprise (L0932) Lecture 2 2
Production Planning and Control (L0929) Lecture 2 2
Production Planning and Control (L0930) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Exercise: The Digital Enterprise (L0933) Recitation Section (small) 1 1
Module Responsible Prof. Hermann Lödding
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Fundamentals of Production and Quality Management
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge Students can explain the contents of the module in detail and take a critical position to them.
Skills Students are capable of choosing and applying models and methods from the module to industrial problems.
Personal Competence
Social Competence Students can develop joint solutions in mixed teams and present them to others.
Autonomy -
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 96, Study Time in Lecture 84
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 180 Minuten
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Logistics, Infrastructure and Mobility: Specialisation Production and Logistics: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L0932: The Digital Enterprise
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Dr. Axel Friedewald
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

Due to the developments of Industry 4.0, digitalization and interconnectivity become a strategic advantage for companies in the international competition. This lecture focuses on the relevant modules and enables the participants to evaluate current developments in this context. In particular, knowledge management, simulation, process modelling and virtual technologies are covered.

Content:

  • Business Process Management and Data Modelling, Simulation
  • Knowledge and Competence Management
  • Process Management (PPC, Workflow Management)
  • Computer Aided Planning (CAP) and NC-Programming
  • Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR)
  • Computer Aided Quality Management (CAQ) 
  • Industry 4.0
Literature

Scheer, A.-W.: ARIS - vom Geschäftsprozeß zum Anwendungssystem. Springer-Verlag, Berlin 4. Aufl. 2002

Schuh, G. et. al.: Produktionsplanung und -steuerung, Springer-Verlag. Berlin 3. Auflage 2006

Becker, J.; Luczak, H.: Workflowmanagement in der Produktionsplanung und -steuerung. Springer-Verlag, Berlin 2004

Pfeifer, T; Schmitt, R.: Masing Handbuch Qualitätsmanagement. Hanser-Verlag, München 5. Aufl. 2007 

Kühn, W.: Digitale Fabrik. Hanser-Verlag, München 2006

Course L0929: Production Planning and Control
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Hermann Lödding
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content
  • Models of Production and Inventory Management
  • Production Programme Planning and Lot Sizing
  • Order and Capacity Scheduling
  • Selected Strategies of PPC
  • Manufacturing Control
  • Production Controlling
  • Supply Chain Management
Literature
  • Vorlesungsskript
  • Lödding, H: Verfahren der Fertigungssteuerung, Springer 2008
  • Nyhuis, P.; Wiendahl, H.-P.: Logistische Kennlinien, Springer 2002
Course L0930: Production Planning and Control
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Prof. Hermann Lödding
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course
Course L0933: Exercise: The Digital Enterprise
Typ Recitation Section (small)
Hrs/wk 1
CP 1
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 16, Study Time in Lecture 14
Lecturer Dr. Axel Friedewald
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

See interlocking course

Literature

Siehe korrespondierende Vorlesung

See interlocking course

Module M1182: Technical Elective Course for TMBMS (according to Subject Specific Regulations)

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Module Responsible Prof. Robert Seifried
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge see FSPO
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge see FSPO
Skills see FSPO
Personal Competence
Social Competence see FSPO
Autonomy see FSPO
Workload in Hours Depends on choice of courses
Credit points 6
Assignment for the Following Curricula Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Aircraft Systems Engineering: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Materials Science: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Maritime Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Energy Systems: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Bio- and Medical Technology: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Robotics and Computer Science: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Simulation Technology: Elective Compulsory

Module M1024: Methods of Integrated Product Development

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Integrated Product Development II (L1254) Lecture 3 3
Integrated Product Development II (L1255) Project-/problem-based Learning 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Dieter Krause
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Basic knowledge of Integrated product development and applying CAE systems

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

After passing the module students are able to:

  • explain technical terms of design methodology,
  • describe essential elements of construction management,
  • describe current problems and the current state of research of integrated product development.
Skills

After passing the module students are able to:

  • select and apply proper construction methods for non-standardized solutions of problems as well as adapt new boundary conditions,
  • solve product development problems with the assistance of a workshop based approach,
  • choose and execute appropriate moderation techniques. 
Personal Competence
Social Competence

After passing the module students are able to:

  • prepare and lead team meetings and moderation processes,
  • work in teams on complex tasks,
  • represent problems and solutions and advance ideas.
Autonomy

After passing the module students are able to:

  • give a structured feedback and accept a critical feedback,
  • implement the accepted feedback autonomous.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Oral exam
Examination duration and scale 30 Minuten
Assignment for the Following Curricula Aircraft Systems Engineering: Specialisation Cabin Systems: Elective Compulsory
Aircraft Systems Engineering: Specialisation Air Transportation Systems: Elective Compulsory
Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation System Design: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Product Development: Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Production: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Specialisation Materials: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Course L1254: Integrated Product Development II
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 3
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 48, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Dieter Krause
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content

Lecture

The lecture extends and enhances the learned content of the module “Integrated Product Development and lightweight design” and is based on the knowledge and skills acquired there.

Topics of the course include in particular:

  • Methods of product development,
  • Presentation techniques,
  • Industrial Design,
  • Design for variety
  • Modularization methods,
  • Design catalogs,
  • Adapted QFD matrix,
  • Systematic material selection,
  • Assembly oriented design,

Construction management

  • CE mark, declaration of conformity including risk assessment,
  • Patents, patent rights, patent monitoring
  • Project management (cost, time, quality) and escalation principles,
  • Development management for mechatronics,
  • Technical Supply Chain Management.

Exercise (PBL)

In the exercise the content presented in the lecture “Integrated Product Development II” and methods of product development and design management will be enhanced.

Students learn an independently moderated and workshop based approach through industry related practice examples to solve complex and currently existing issues in product development. They will learn the ability to apply important methods of product development and design management autonomous and acquire further expertise in the field of integrated product development. Besides personal skills, such as teamwork, guiding discussions and representing work results will be acquired through the workshop based structure of the event under its own planning and management.


Literature
  • Andreasen, M.M., Design for Assembly, Berlin, Springer 1985.
  • Ashby, M. F.: Materials Selection in Mechanical Design, München, Spektrum 2007.
  • Beckmann, H.: Supply Chain Management, Berlin, Springer 2004.
  • Hartmann, M., Rieger, M., Funk, R., Rath, U.: Zielgerichtet moderieren. Ein Handbuch für Führungskräfte, Berater und Trainer, Weinheim, Beltz 2007.
  • Pahl, G., Beitz, W.: Konstruktionslehre, Berlin, Springer 2006.
  • Roth, K.H.: Konstruieren mit Konstruktionskatalogen, Band 1-3, Berlin, Springer 2000.
  • Simpson, T.W., Siddique, Z., Jiao, R.J.: Product Platform and Product Family Design. Methods and Applications, New York, Springer 2013.
Course L1255: Integrated Product Development II
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Dieter Krause
Language DE
Cycle WiSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1143: Applied Design Methodology in Mechatronics

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Applied Design Methodology in Mechatronics (L1523) Lecture 2 2
Applied Design Methodology in Mechatronics (L1524) Project-/problem-based Learning 3 4
Module Responsible Prof. Thorsten Kern
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Basics of mechanical design, electrical design or computer-sciences
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

Science-based working on interdisciplinary product design considering targeted application of specific product design techniques

Skills

Creative handling of processes used for scientific preparation and formulation of complex product design problems / Application of various product design techniques following theoretical aspects.

Personal Competence
Social Competence Students will solve and execute technical-scientific tasks from an industrial context in small design-teams with application of common, creative methodologies.
Autonomy Students are enabled to optimize the design and development process according to the target and topic of the design
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 110, Study Time in Lecture 70
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Subject theoretical and practical work
Examination duration and scale 30 min Presentation for a group design-work
Assignment for the Following Curricula International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Mechatronics: Elective Compulsory
Mechanical Engineering and Management: Specialisation Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation System Design: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Artificial Organs and Regenerative Medicine: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Implants and Endoprostheses: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Medical Technology and Control Theory: Elective Compulsory
Biomedical Engineering: Specialisation Management and Business Administration: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Course L1523: Applied Design Methodology in Mechatronics
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 2
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 32, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Thorsten Kern
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content
  • Systematic analysis and planning of the design process for products combining a multitude of disciplines
  • Structure of the engineering process with focus on engineering steps (task-definition, functional decomposition, physical principles, elements for solution, combination to systems and products, execution of design, component-tests, system-tests, product-testing and qualification/validation)
  • Creative methods (Basics, methods like lead-user-method, 6-3-5, BrainStorming, Intergalactic Thinking, … - Applications in examples all around mechatronics topics)
  • Several design-supporting methods and tools (functional strcutures, GALFMOS, AEIOU-method, GAMPFT, simulation and its application, TRIZ, design for SixSigma, continous integration and testing, …)
  • Evaluation and final selection of solution (technical and business-considerations, preference-matrix, pair-comparision), dealing with uncertainties, decision-making
  • Value-analysis
  • Derivation of architectures and architectural management
  • Project-tracking and -guidance (project-lead, guiding of employees, organization of multidisciplinary R&D departments, idea-identification, responsibilities and communication)
  • Project-execution methods (Scrum, Kanbaan, …)
  • Presentation-skills
  • Questions of aesthetic product design and design for subjective requirements (industrial design, color, haptic/optic/acoustic interfaces)
  • Evaluation of selected methods at practical examples in small teams
Literature
  • Definition folgt...
  • Pahl, G.; Beitz, W.; Feldhusen, J.; Grote, K.-H.: Konstruktionslehre: Grundlage erfolgreicher Produktentwicklung, Methoden und Anwendung, 7. Auflage, Springer Verlag, Berlin 2007
  • VDI-Richtlinien: 2206; 2221ff
Course L1524: Applied Design Methodology in Mechatronics
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 3
CP 4
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 78, Study Time in Lecture 42
Lecturer Prof. Thorsten Kern
Language EN
Cycle SoSe
Content See interlocking course
Literature See interlocking course

Module M1281: Advanced Topics in Vibration

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Advanced Topics in Vibration (L1743) Project-/problem-based Learning 4 6
Module Responsible Prof. Norbert Hoffmann
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge Vibration Theory
Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge Students are able to reflect existing terms and concepts of Advanced Vibrations and to develop and research new terms and concepts.
Skills Students are able to apply existing methods and procesures of Advanced Vibrations and to develop novel methods and procedures.
Personal Competence
Social Competence Students can reach working results also in groups.
Autonomy Students are able to approach given research tasks individually and to identify and follow up novel research tasks by themselves.
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 2 Hours
Assignment for the Following Curricula Mechatronics: Specialisation System Design: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation Intelligent Systems and Robotics: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Course L1743: Advanced Topics in Vibration
Typ Project-/problem-based Learning
Hrs/wk 4
CP 6
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Lecturer Prof. Norbert Hoffmann, Merten Tiedemann, Sebastian Kruse
Language DE/EN
Cycle SoSe
Content Research Topics in Vibrations.
Literature Aktuelle Veröffentlichungen

Module M0805: Technical Acoustics I (Acoustic Waves, Noise Protection, Psycho Acoustics )

Courses
Title Typ Hrs/wk CP
Technical Acoustics I (Acoustic Waves, Noise Protection, Psycho Acoustics ) (L0516) Lecture 2 3
Technical Acoustics I (Acoustic Waves, Noise Protection, Psycho Acoustics ) (L0518) Recitation Section (large) 2 3
Module Responsible Prof. Otto von Estorff
Admission Requirements None
Recommended Previous Knowledge

Mechanics I (Statics, Mechanics of Materials) and Mechanics II (Hydrostatics, Kinematics, Dynamics)

Mathematics I, II, III (in particular differential equations)

Educational Objectives After taking part successfully, students have reached the following learning results
Professional Competence
Knowledge

The students possess an in-depth knowledge in acoustics regarding acoustic waves, noise protection, and psycho acoustics and are able to give an overview of the corresponding theoretical and methodical basis.

Skills

The students are capable to handle engineering problems in acoustics by theory-based application of the demanding methodologies and measurement procedures treated within the module.

Personal Competence
Social Competence

Students can work in small groups on specific problems to arrive at joint solutions.

Autonomy

The students are able to independently solve challenging acoustical problems in the areas treated within the module. Possible conflicting issues and limitations can be identified and the results are critically scrutinized.

Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 124, Study Time in Lecture 56
Credit points 6
Course achievement None
Examination Written exam
Examination duration and scale 90 min
Assignment for the Following Curricula Energy Systems: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Aircraft Systems Engineering: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
International Management and Engineering: Specialisation II. Aviation Systems: Elective Compulsory
Mechatronics: Specialisation System Design: Elective Compulsory
Product Development, Materials and Production: Core qualification: Elective Compulsory
Technomathematics: Specialisation III. Engineering Science: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Technical Complementary Course: Elective Compulsory
Theoretical Mechanical Engineering: Specialisation Product Development and Production: Elective Compulsory
Course L0516: Technical Acoustics I (Acoustic Waves, Noise Protection, Psycho Acoustics )
Typ Lecture
Hrs/wk 2
CP 3
Workload in Hours Independent Study Time 62, Study Time in Lecture 28
Lecturer Prof. Otto von Estorff
Language EN
Cycle SoSe